i think i learnt my lesson but I haven't

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Study6076
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Long story short didnt revise for mocks due to procrastination...failed them...I am in Year 12 doing AS.

When i was super panicky in my exams bcs I didnt know what to write I was like I defo learnt my lesson to not procrastinate and revise next time or when i got my results and I flopped.

I have parents evening next week and I am scared for MY LIFE AND WHEN WE GET OUR REPORTS WITH OUR MOCK GRADES (b4 PARENT'S EVENING)

but like now when I am not stressed and calm cus I dont have exams I procrastinate even tho I know everything I described above help
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Study6076)
Long story short didnt revise for mocks due to procrastination...failed them...I am in Year 12 doing AS.

When i was super panicky in my exams bcs I didnt know what to write I was like I defo learnt my lesson to not procrastinate and revise next time or when i got my results and I flopped.

I have parents evening next week and I am scared for MY LIFE AND WHEN WE GET OUR REPORTS WITH OUR MOCK GRADES (b4 PARENT'S EVENING)

but like now when I am not stressed and calm cus I dont have exams I procrastinate even tho I know everything I described above help
My experience with procrastination is not necessarily the deadline or the importance of the task that is holding you back. There is usually something more admist that is stopping you from proceeding. It's food for thought, and you would probably want to spend some time doing a lot of self reflection. Otherwise, you could be self sabotaging for no reason.

The things that really helped me get through periods of intense procrastination are:
  • Schedules - timetable everything, and make sure you work on a 40 hour week basis (I go for 60 hours, but that's me)
  • Have exam past papers and work on them regularly - try to do them under timed conditions where possible, then mark them and see where your weaknesses are. Work on those weaknesses and aim to score higher after every iteration.
  • Spent at least 5 minutes starting a task and trying to build on momentum
  • If you can't do anything for 5 minutes, do something productive that keeps your braining running or warmed up
  • Schedule in regular breaks - pomodoro technique suggest every half an hour, but I'm more intense so I go for every 2 hours or until I have reached a decent milestone
  • Journal your progress, and check what you need to do
  • Ask your teachers for regular feedback and act on them
  • Use all the resources your teachers give you on the day they are provided to you
  • Structure your life around your specific goals, and don't let that structure collapse. Anything that doesn't really support that structure is either a one off thing/something you do once in a while, or it's not necessary
  • Have reminders or timetables stuck where it's visible in your workspace. You can set reminders in your calendar app on your phone.
  • Seek mentorship or some sort of coach who would keep tabs on your and get him/her to remind you why you asked for their help. Ideally this person has top grades
  • Have a study group where you have other people hold you accountable and study together. (The idea is if you see other people working alongside with you, you feel the task is less daunting - use your cognitive biases to your advantage.)
  • Experiment until you find something that truely works for you - as we're all individuals and blanket advice doesn't always work
  • Schedule in revision time throughout the year and not just weeks before the exams.

There are plenty of YouTube videos by people who have earned top grades in their A Levels, especially if they managed to get into top universities. I consider them my first sources to check to see whether what I am doing is keeping me on track. If you want recommendations, let me know.

As important as it is to do the right thing and using the right strategies (because it makes life a lot easier, and you don't have to work as hard to achieve higher targets), I think your case is just getting started more than anything (doing anything at this moment in time is better than doing nothing).
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Study6076
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
My experience with procrastination is not necessarily the deadline or the importance of the task that is holding you back. There is usually something more admist that is stopping you from proceeding. It's food for thought, and you would probably want to spend some time doing a lot of self reflection. Otherwise, you could be self sabotaging for no reason.

The things that really helped me get through periods of intense procrastination are:
  • Schedules - timetable everything, and make sure you work on a 40 hour week basis (I go for 60 hours, but that's me)
  • Have exam past papers and work on them regularly - try to do them under timed conditions where possible, then mark them and see where your weaknesses are. Work on those weaknesses and aim to score higher after every iteration.
  • Spent at least 5 minutes starting a task and trying to build on momentum
  • If you can't do anything for 5 minutes, do something productive that keeps your braining running or warmed up
  • Schedule in regular breaks - pomodoro technique suggest every half an hour, but I'm more intense so I go for every 2 hours or until I have reached a decent milestone
  • Journal your progress, and check what you need to do
  • Ask your teachers for regular feedback and act on them
  • Use all the resources your teachers give you on the day they are provided to you
  • Structure your life around your specific goals, and don't let that structure collapse. Anything that doesn't really support that structure is either a one off thing/something you do once in a while, or it's not necessary
  • Have reminders or timetables stuck where it's visible in your workspace. You can set reminders in your calendar app on your phone.
  • Seek mentorship or some sort of coach who would keep tabs on your and get him/her to remind you why you asked for their help. Ideally this person has top grades
  • Have a study group where you have other people hold you accountable and study together. (The idea is if you see other people working alongside with you, you feel the task is less daunting - use your cognitive biases to your advantage.)
  • Experiment until you find something that truely works for you - as we're all individuals and blanket advice doesn't always work
  • Schedule in revision time throughout the year and not just weeks before the exams.

There are plenty of YouTube videos by people who have earned top grades in their A Levels, especially if they managed to get into top universities. I consider them my first sources to check to see whether what I am doing is keeping me on track. If you want recommendations, let me know.

As important as it is to do the right thing and using the right strategies (because it makes life a lot easier, and you don't have to work as hard to achieve higher targets), I think your case is just getting started more than anything (doing anything at this moment in time is better than doing nothing).
Thank you so much for replying and in so much detail. I aprreciate it.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Study6076)
Thank you so much for replying and in so much detail. I aprreciate it.
Forgot to also mention the following:

  • Keep your workspace/desk moderately tidy - a messy desk can demotivate anyone, but an absolutely clean desk does very little. If you have a stack of things in your to do pile, keep something like 80% of it on the floor by the table, and work on the 20% on the table. I tend to find this helpful as it keeps you focus whilst mentally keep things manageable. (It doesn't need to be 80:20, just enough to hold with one hand sort of thing)
  • Steven Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Successful People mentions the important vs urgent grid (it's worth reading the whole book for this one section alone). Highly successful people spend most of their time doing stuff that is important, but not urgent. They will attend to things that are important and urgent first though. If you are spending most of your time working on things that are neither important nor urgent, you need to reprioritise. If you are working on things that are urgent but not important, you might need to think about rescheduling and question whether you need to deal with the thing you're working on.
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