AchyutChaudhary
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Hi all,

In your opinion, how hard do you find A-Level history?
Is it easier/ harder than people tell you what it will be like?
Is the jump from GCSE to A-Level quite high and very big, especially after the reforms from 2015 including no AS level exams and 9-1 GCSE?
Are the exams much more challenging than GCSE’s?
How useful are textbooks and revision guides/ workbooks?
Is the A-Level interesting?

There’s no right or wrong answer, it is all about your personal opinions, looking forward to hear from you!
Thanks
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Lakhmehr Singh
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(Original post by AchyutChaudhary)
Hi all,

In your opinion, how hard do you find A-Level history?
Is it easier/ harder than people tell you what it will be like?
Is the jump from GCSE to A-Level quite high and very big, especially after the reforms from 2015 including no AS level exams and 9-1 GCSE?
Are the exams much more challenging than GCSE’s?
How useful are textbooks and revision guides/ workbooks?
Is the A-Level interesting?

There’s no right or wrong answer, it is all about your personal opinions, looking forward to hear from you!
Thanks
For any A level, you need to be on the ball from the get go. Revise, revise, revise. Specifically for A level history, there is some much more content to learn about. If you revise and everything from the beginning, then you can really hone in on your exam practice. The exams are much more challenging and strenuous but if you're willing to put in the work, then you'll do well. The textbooks are useful content wise and history is interesting. So revise everyday, practice your exam approach and you'll get that A*.
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Sinnoh
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I did OCR A-level history, with Civil Rights in the USA as for the thematic study, Tudors 1547-1603 for one depth study, and Russia 1894-1941 for the other depth study.

How hard did I find it?
I found the thematic study to be a lot easier to get high marks in than the other two topics. I think this is because I worked out quite early on a good formula for writing essays, and the topic was easily the most interesting, whereas with the Tudor topics it was harder to keep myself interested and the depth studies required more, well, depth. So there was a lot of very specific info that I had to learn. Coursework would have been a lot easier had I managed my time better and not left it so late, but I still got a good mark in that. I also couldn't really get the highest marks for the Tudor and Russia topics. Thing is with A-level history, you could memorise every word in the textbook cover-to-cover and still do badly, because the exams aren't just a test of knowledge anymore.
I don't remember what people told me it would be like, if they ever told me that. Nobody in my family took A-level history and I didn't really know anyone in the year above.

Jump in difficulty from GCSE to A-level?
I was among the last cohort doing the old-spec GCSEs. That said, I didn't really notice much of a jump in difficulty at the start, changes in workload are really dependent on your school and even your teacher within the school. It also just feels like a very different subject so it's hard to compare. Undoubtedly, the questions are much longer than in GCSE, the answers you have to give more nuanced, and the detail which you have to know is much greater.

Are the exams harder?
Well, they're longer (on average) and there's more to write. The time pressure can be pretty significant so you have to figure out your arguments very quickly.

How useful are the textbooks and revision guides?
My teachers provided us with their own revision notes, and they were excellent. They had everything I could possibly need to know and more. The official textbook for civil rights in the USA was quite meagre given how much there is to say about it, but the textbooks for Tudors and Russia were more suitable.

Is it interesting?
That really depends on what topics you study for it.
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