AchyutChaudhary
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
Hi all,

In your opinion, how hard do you find A-Level Geography?
Is it easier/ harder than people tell you what it will be like?
Is the jump from GCSE to A-Level quite high and very big, especially after the reforms from 2015 including no AS level exams and 9-1 GCSE?
Are the exams much more challenging than GCSE’s?
How useful are textbooks and revision guides/ workbooks?
Is the A-Level interesting?

There’s no right or wrong answer, it is all about your personal opinions, looking forward to hear from you!
Thanks
0
reply
pkatesuppiah
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 months ago
#2
(Original post by AchyutChaudhary)
Hi all,

In your opinion, how hard do you find A-Level Geography?
Is it easier/ harder than people tell you what it will be like?
Is the jump from GCSE to A-Level quite high and very big, especially after the reforms from 2015 including no AS level exams and 9-1 GCSE?
Are the exams much more challenging than GCSE’s?
How useful are textbooks and revision guides/ workbooks?
Is the A-Level interesting?

There’s no right or wrong answer, it is all about your personal opinions, looking forward to hear from you!
Thanks
Hi, so I take Alevel Geography with CAIE and I really love it. It is hard however, I find a lot of the content is continuation of IGCSE (I'm not sure for AQA Geo) and if you like the subject I feel it is enjoyable to take. When it comes to it though you'll just have to be practicing a lot of exam questions as I find the specificity of answers is what catches me up. And as always learn ur case studies because without them you're stuck.
Hope this helps
0
reply
deltagolf
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 months ago
#3
Hi, I'm a Year 13 Geography student and I study the AQA course. Personally, I don't find A-level Geography hard. The content of the course is not actually too hard, a lot of what is taught expands upon knowledge from GCSE and goes in a bit more depth. The new topics you will learn are also not too hard, I don't think there is an overwhelming amount of content either. So I would not say that the jump is anything high or such, when you start learning at first you may struggle slightly or get a bit confused but that really goes away over time as you develop your ability to think geographically and answer A-level Geography questions. Here is where I would say it becomes different from GCSE, the way in which we go about answering exam questions. You will definitely utilise your GCSE Geography skills in answering questions, like developing points and using evidence, but I feel that at A-level it changes a bit. When answering questions at A-level it is sort of like you are answering in a very geographical sense, you are always considering what is the geography behind the issue you are dealing with and have to always use geography to explain your answers. I would say that at A-level you are taught proper geography and you may realise that the study of geography is all about the processes and systems of the natural world and its human interactions, once you realise this the exams become easier because you must explain your points using geographical theory, knowledge and processes. Exam questions at A-level are much more evaluative than at GCSE and as the other answer said there is an extent of specificity required, for example if the question is about how deindustrialisation causes social segregation in cities then you must talk about deindustrialisation and its impact on cities. That is not to say that A-level Geography exams are like Maths and Physics exams where there are definitive answers, when given a question in Geography there are so many different routes you can take to answering it and I guess it is also sort of like answering the whole as to 'why' the situation the question poses is so. I think it is quite good in this sense because it really develops your analytical, evaluative and critical thinking skills. When I started my A-levels, I asked all my teachers if revision guides are useful at A-level. They can be helpful and in Geography I would say they are most helpful for learning on the different processes in different topics of geography like erosion, suburbanisation or CCS. However, textbooks aren't a must because they aren't as useful as they were during GCSE. All my teachers had told me that my notes will be one of the best revision resources and I would definitely agree there, your notes are essentially like a textbook. Different colleges teach in different ways so when you start A-levels I'd say to ensure that you make good quality notes. Revision is definitely very important at A-level so maybe a workbook might be better than a textbook because I'd say while it is important to go over knowledge, practice becomes very important at A-level. You need to be able to apply your geographical knowledge to answering questions so exam practice and practicing answering exam type questions is a really good way for A-level revision and also becoming familiar with how the marking works. As I said before, there are several ways in which you can approach a question in A-level Geography so exam practice does help to build up your thoughts regarding certain topics and store it in your memory. Like the other answer said, knowing case studies is also quite good for maximising marks and writing detailed answers. This is another reason why textbooks may not be most useful because they may use different case studies. I actually don't have a text book and I don't know anyone who does.
Now, I have always been quite a keen geography student and it's always been my favourite subject so I do definitely find the A-level interesting. Being a geography minded person, I have found the A-level has given words to many observations I have had of the world. I'd say changing places is one of the most interesting subjects because it is very different to anything you will have studied at GCSE, making you question at first that this is related to geography, but it is one of the key topics in the study of geography.

Another thing with the A-level is that you do an NEA which is a full geographical investigation of your choice where you have to utilise a wide range of skills and use several geographical theories. You have to make hypotheses and stuff so it's quite good for developing research skills. I actually have not done one yet but with the pandemic I am not sure if I will. I won't be able to give too much information on that but you can look at example NEAs online to get an idea of what it is like, all the exam boards publish an example NEA. It would be quite an interesting part of the course.
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (33)
29.73%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (10)
9.01%
No I am happy with my choice (61)
54.95%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (7)
6.31%

Watched Threads

View All