What sectors do you think will boom after Covid?

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ASavageMonster
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Anything for graduates?
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DiddyDec
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Healthcare will boom, it already is in some respects.

Serviced offices possibly since traditional offices will likely struggle with the rise of home/remote working.

Telecoms will likely benefit from increased home working due to the need for better connectivity.
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Chronoscope
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Possibly clothes/the clothing sector.
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imlikeahermit
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Escorting.

Admins, please let this stay.
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MatureStudent37
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I suspect most security will boom.

Even before Covid we were seeing some very positive signs in economic performance. Obviously very difficult to see unless you started going to trade specific journals, economic reports etc etc as the most of the media was trying to link ore brexit negotiations to any doom and gloom. Read a newspaper and his have thought we were in a 1930s type depression.

Now the uncertainty of brexit is over. (Business’s don’t like uncertainty. They’ll still
Operate but they like to know things like what is happening in the future before investing)

So we’ll have a post brexit bounce which we’re seeing with businesses investing (there’s normally a lag though - you’ve invested in a new factory but that won’t be built and operational for a year or two) plus I suspect we’ll see a post Covid bounce. It’s sad that some people have lost their jobs and are financially struggling, but the other people (the majority) have been sat at home banking cash. My bank account has never looked better even against the attempts of my wife to single handedly boost on line sales by herself.

We’ll have. Quick transition though. Some
Companies will go busy as furlough is lifted, others will however thrive by taking on these new customers.

The only sector that worries me is aerospace. Military aerospace has continued and even expanded during the lockdown. Civil aerospace has struggled. It’s going to take some time for planes to be transporting people on holiday and then require spare parts for servicing. There’s a lot of pre finished spares in the system already.

One thing this lockdown and the EUs recent hissy fit has shown us is a strategic need for some Manufacturing to be bought back home. We’ve seen China hoard PPE. Germany hoard ventilators and the EU threaten our pharmaceutical sector. All at the behest of protecting their own national interests.

I doubt that lesson will be forgotten too soon.
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JOSH4598
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Serviced offices possibly since traditional offices will likely struggle with the rise of home/remote working.
This. If anyone is looking at starting a business, any form of hot-desking where firms rent x number of spaces per hour will almost certinaly boom. Most big firms are not renewing leases and are telling their employees to work from home permanently. There will be a huge rise in demand for meeting rooms and office space which is rented out for short periods when employees need to see each other in person for a weekly meeting etc.

Of course the start-up cost is not cheap though, especially if you have to buy the building to start with!
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
This. If anyone is looking at starting a business, any form of hot-desking where firms rent x number of spaces per hour will almost certinaly boom. Most big firms are not renewing leases and are telling their employees to work from home permanently. There will be a huge rise in demand for meeting rooms and office space which is rented out for short periods when employees need to see each other in person for a weekly meeting etc.

Of course the start-up cost is not cheap though, especially if you have to buy the building to start with!
Rent on normal offices should be fairly cheap now which means you can rent instead of buying the building and still make your money back with even better margins.
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JOSH4598
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Rent on normal offices should be fairly cheap now which means you can rent instead of buying the building and still make your money back with even better margins.
True, although it depends on the contract for leasing a building and whether the landlord permits that kind of thing.

I think it would be most profitable for investors in the smaller cities outside of London (or anywhere in the UK) where commercial properties are fairly inexpensive to purchase. To buy a small office block with good transport links to the rest of the region would attract a lot of interest rather than traditional city-centre office blocks.
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MatureStudent37
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
This. If anyone is looking at starting a business, any form of hot-desking where firms rent x number of spaces per hour will almost certinaly boom. Most big firms are not renewing leases and are telling their employees to work from home permanently. There will be a huge rise in demand for meeting rooms and office space which is rented out for short periods when employees need to see each other in person for a weekly meeting etc.

Of course the start-up cost is not cheap though, especially if you have to buy the building to start with!
Very good point. My wife’s organisation has very large offices. Everybody has transitioned to working from home. They’ve down sizing and carrying in as they are and only having a small footprint in order to get people in for a few days for meetings etc.

I think we may see office rental space hit and possibly retail outlets.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
True, although it depends on the contract for leasing a building and whether the landlord permits that kind of thing.

I think it would be most profitable for investors in the smaller cities outside of London (or anywhere in the UK) where commercial properties are fairly inexpensive to purchase. To buy a small office block with good transport links to the rest of the region would attract a lot of interest rather than traditional city-centre office blocks.
A landlord would be foolish not to take a willing tenant in this market. Better to have a tenant than an empty office that they will likely have to pay rates mitigation scheme for.

London offices are never worth the money, Birmingham and Manchester are better options although I would avoid out of town offices unless they have the required amenities such as cafes and small supermarkets to make them vaguely desirable. While parking is generally better transport links can be somewhat tenuous if you are relying on public transport.
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Napp
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Well it really depends what the grad has the degree in..
anything online, digital, creatives etc. should be fine as theyre only artificially suppressed anyway. That being said, there is going to be a glut of people with actual experience needing jobs, having been sacked, who should take precedence over a grad.
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