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Current Student at Scottish Medical School Fed Up of Woke

Hi I'm not looking for a political discussion here so anybody who is inclined to do so, find another thread.

I'm a conservative medical student and I have had it up to my eyeballs with aggressive leftism, wokery, BLM, anti-English fervour etc on campus here. I need to get out of Scotland. I don't think the rest of the UK or even the USA would be much better so I'm looking to go elsewhere.

I don't have endless supplies of cash so I am looking for somewhere abroad to transfer where they teach in English. I'm looking at Eastern and Southern Europe, maybe Russia too. I'm open to Asia as well but doubt I'll find anywhere that will take me.

Does anyone know of any places in the world that will accept a transfer student, teach in English and might be more traditional? Does anyone know of anyone who has transferred.

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I have a brother who lives in Scotland with his family, and he's been telling me that the anti-English sentiment is getting quite bad. I think most universities will have plenty of "woke" students, although there are also plenty of (albeit quieter) conservatives at my uni too. I think you'd find most English universities would serve you ok.
This isn't something you can escape from easily.

The medical and scientific world is filled with woke nonsense. I do not believe that this is a Scotland-specific problem.

I have no useful advice to give, sadly. I'm a registrar in the UK, and I'm conservative too. I just have to grit my teeth and stay silent, as I wouldn't want to jeopardise my career.
Original post by samesamesame
Hi I'm not looking for a political discussion here so anybody who is inclined to do so, find another thread.

I'm a conservative medical student and I have had it up to my eyeballs with aggressive leftism, wokery, BLM, anti-English fervour etc on campus here. I need to get out of Scotland. I don't think the rest of the UK or even the USA would be much better so I'm looking to go elsewhere.

I don't have endless supplies of cash so I am looking for somewhere abroad to transfer where they teach in English. I'm looking at Eastern and Southern Europe, maybe Russia too. I'm open to Asia as well but doubt I'll find anywhere that will take me.

Does anyone know of any places in the world that will accept a transfer student, teach in English and might be more traditional? Does anyone know of anyone who has transferred.

Charles University in Prague teaches in English. Also plenty of universities in Romania, Bulgaria and Lithuania that teach in English and may accept transfers. Search “Study Medicine in Europe”.
Original post by Anonymous
This isn't something you can escape from easily.

The medical and scientific world is filled with woke nonsense. I do not believe that this is a Scotland-specific problem.

I have no useful advice to give, sadly. I'm a registrar in the UK, and I'm conservative too. I just have to grit my teeth and stay silent, as I wouldn't want to jeopardise my career.

Problem is buddy, you're going to make yourself sick that way. Any system that silences you and forces you to keep things locked in internally, is going to make you ill. Your health has to come first.

I'm not even sure I want to practice at this rate, just finish what I blooming started. Maybe best for us to go and make big dollar. Only money protects you from the constant threat of cancellation.

In any case I'm sorry it's like that for you.

Anyway I think there'll be more freedom in hyper-conservative Hungary or Poland or Italy. The medicine will be the same, but the context will be better.
Original post by Anonymous
Charles University in Prague teaches in English. Also plenty of universities in Romania, Bulgaria and Lithuania that teach in English and may accept transfers. Search “Study Medicine in Europe”.

Thank you - Charles et al are quite expensive i.e. same price as the UK but no tuition fee loans or any support. I think the Ukraine is much cheaper. I'll have a look at that and the ones you mentioned thank you!
Original post by -Imperator-
I have a brother who lives in Scotland with his family, and he's been telling me that the anti-English sentiment is getting quite bad. I think most universities will have plenty of "woke" students, although there are also plenty of (albeit quieter) conservatives at my uni too. I think you'd find most English universities would serve you ok.

I have friends in London who tell me that the anti-white racism (mostly from white staff) and wokery is unbelievable. Where are you at university?
You can transfer to Eastern Europe. I don't recommend reaching out to the agencies, you should go directly to the Dean's office. In my experience the agencies are pretty rubbish and they charge.

Having been educated in Eastern Europe myself there are few things to bear in mind;

1. It's very difficult or impossible to get a loan for living or fees. Living expenses are much less than here though and fees range from around 7-12k/year. Often paid in Euros or the local currency and at the moment FX markets seem very reactive, meaning you cannot guarantee your fees for the next X number of years.

2. Depending on what year you are in to whether this is relevant; the UKMLA will be rolled out soon, so if you want to come back that could be difficult as I am assuming it will be based on the UK curriculum and well supported for learning here. Also, with Brexit, RN a new step has already been introduced for IMGs. They must have their diplomas verified by an outside company in order to gain a license. In Eastern Europe students graduate later and this extra step might render them ineligible if they cannot do this process before August. There is also no guarantee that this won't change again and they might introduce another hoop to jump through.

3. If you don't want to come back to the UK/US then you will have to learn the language of the country. I'm pretty sure you won't want to work in Eastern Europe, for example in Poland, "staż" the FY1 equivalent pays around 600 £ a month, it's barely enough to survive.

4. In Eastern Europe the opposite movement to the UK is happening, recently they just introduced a blanket ban on abortion. There is also an "anti-immigration sentiment". i'm also fairly conservative, but when they started closing shops (even supermarkets) on Sunday because it was in keeping with Catholic values ..... I wondered how much more I could take!

5. In terms of teaching, you get bad and good. I'm sure it's just like anywhere else. But if you perceive something as unfair nobody will listen to your voice. I didn't know one single student with reasonable adjustments in my school, it was just something they hadn't heard of. So my dyslexic friend just muddled through.

6. Due to point 1, there are very few Brits. Mostly there are Irish, Scandinavians and those from further afield. These groups are clicky and if you want to study in a group they will want to conduct it in their own language and most of the social events were geared towards Scandinavians. Personally, that meant I forged few friendships and it was quite a lonely time, although the ones I forged were of good quality and i maintain to this day !

7. At my school, exam schedules were made by students, this was carnage. Being an overseas student means there are 2 groups of students .... those desperate to get home and those who have a GF/BF at uni and don't want to go home because they live far apart from their partners.
Original post by Anonymous
This isn't something you can escape from easily.

The medical and scientific world is filled with woke nonsense. I do not believe that this is a Scotland-specific problem.

I have no useful advice to give, sadly. I'm a registrar in the UK, and I'm conservative too. I just have to grit my teeth and stay silent, as I wouldn't want to jeopardise my career.

christ
Original post by samesamesame
Hi I'm not looking for a political discussion here so anybody who is inclined to do so, find another thread.

I'm a conservative medical student and I have had it up to my eyeballs with aggressive leftism, wokery, BLM, anti-English fervour etc on campus here. I need to get out of Scotland. I don't think the rest of the UK or even the USA would be much better so I'm looking to go elsewhere.

I don't have endless supplies of cash so I am looking for somewhere abroad to transfer where they teach in English. I'm looking at Eastern and Southern Europe, maybe Russia too. I'm open to Asia as well but doubt I'll find anywhere that will take me.

Does anyone know of any places in the world that will accept a transfer student, teach in English and might be more traditional? Does anyone know of anyone who has transferred.

jesus wtf
Original post by Anonymous
christ

What?
Reply 11
Original post by samesamesame
I have friends in London who tell me that the anti-white racism (mostly from white staff) and wokery is unbelievable. Where are you at university?

"anti-white racisim" looooool are you ok?
get off the internet for a while, and just shut off from it all and finish your studies.

Serriously, If your feeling this way I guarantee that your consuming a lot of media online thats hyping up the way you feel and making everything that's happening in person seem worse than it is.

Best thing you can do is to finish your studies as you are though, and then look at your options. Its fine to want to re-locate to a different culture that you think will better suit you. There are plenty out there, and I must admit that living in an un-woke culture is really really lovely at times. But at other times its awful and you'll miss a lot of the progressive things that came along with the stuff that pissed you off before.

If I were you, cut yourself off from social media, youtube and the like, bunker down and focus on your studies, and then after you graduate look at trying to live abroad and see how you get on.
You could try Republic of Ireland, nothing to lose by contacting Admissions at their med schools and asking.

I guess you will want to avoid BSMS with their ridiculous re-branding of breastmilk as chest milk! I can't help thinking that their approach will increase resentment against trans people. Live and let live is more widely acceptable as a principle.
Original post by Anonymous
You could try Republic of Ireland, nothing to lose by contacting Admissions at their med schools and asking.

I guess you will want to avoid BSMS with their ridiculous re-branding of breastmilk as chest milk! I can't help thinking that their approach will increase resentment against trans people. Live and let live is more widely acceptable as a principle.

What is BSMS?
Original post by Anonymous
I guess you will want to avoid BSMS with their ridiculous re-branding of breastmilk as chest milk! I can't help thinking that their approach will increase resentment against trans people. Live and let live is more widely acceptable as a principle.

From what I can tell, what has happened in Brighton and Sussex is that the maternity services (or, perinatal services, as it is now known) have realised that their care has been targeted towards cis women only and so they have taken a step towards improving the way they deliver care for trans men and non-binary people. (And, yes, by the way, trans men and AFAB non-binary people can get pregnant just like cis women and so also attend these services.) What this means is that if a patient who accesses the service is trans or non-binary, then the staff members looking after them will ensure they use words that will not evoke dysphoria eg 'birthing parent' instead of 'woman', as the person giving birth in this case does not identify as a woman. Any cis woman who accesses the service will STILL be referred to as a woman and as a mother etc. No one is forcing any different terminology on anyone who doesn't want it. It is simply ensuring that the correct language is used for the people that do. How is this anything but a good thing? And how on earth would this increase resentment against trans people? I don't see how this would make other patients resentful of trans people as only trans and non-binary people would even hear this vocabulary used anyway.

Edited just to add: chest milk would be used when speaking to a trans or non-binary person about feeding their newborn. The reason this term is a better term to use is because the use of the word 'breast' may cause dysphoria in these patients. I.e. 'chestfeeding' is just an alternative option that can be used for these patients. Once again, what is wrong with that? Cis women can still call it breastfeeding if they want, there's no issue there.
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by nocheloche
From what I can tell, what has happened in Brighton and Sussex is that the maternity services (or, perinatal services, as it is now known) have realised that their care has been targeted towards cis women only and so they have taken a step towards improving the way they deliver care for trans men and non-binary people. (And, yes, by the way, trans men and AFAB non-binary people can get pregnant just like cis women and so also attend these services.) What this means is that if a patient who accesses the service is trans or non-binary, then the staff members looking after them will ensure they use words that will not evoke dysphoria eg 'birthing parent' instead of 'woman', as the person giving birth in this case does not identify as a woman. Any cis woman who accesses the service will STILL be referred to as a woman and as a mother etc. No one is forcing any different terminology on anyone who doesn't want it. It is simply ensuring that the correct language is used for the people that do. How is this anything but a good thing? And how on earth would this increase resentment against trans people? I don't see how this would make other patients resentful of trans people as only trans and non-binary people would even hear this vocabulary used anyway.

Edited just to add: chest milk would be used when speaking to a trans or non-binary person about feeding their newborn. The reason this term is a better term to use is because the use of the word 'breast' may cause dysphoria in these patients. I.e. 'chestfeeding' is just an alternative option that can be used for these patients. Once again, what is wrong with that? Cis women can still call it breastfeeding if they want, there's no issue there.

Actually the article says they are changing all their literature to refer to chest feeding. Breast does not actually mean just female chest, it is a non-gender word - men have "clasped people to their breast" and worn double breasted suits for more than 100 years. The Robin red breast is male or female, all chickens have breast meat. This is wokery and just creates more difference.
Man I’m so glad I found this thread 🤣🤣
The tears, frustration, hysteria from the conservatives and the explanations from the left (especially “chest feeding” 💀💀💀) is hilarious!!
Thanks for the laugh guys
Y’all will be fine.
Original post by Anonymous
Actually the article says they are changing all their literature to refer to chest feeding. Breast does not actually mean just female chest, it is a non-gender word - men have "clasped people to their breast" and worn double breasted suits for more than 100 years. The Robin red breast is male or female, all chickens have breast meat. This is wokery and just creates more difference.

You’re right, the article does say they will include ‘chest or breast feeding’ in their leaflets etc that are seen by the patients using their service. This is to allow for people who experience dysphoria at the mention of their breasts to feel more comfortable. Why is this an issue?

In terms of the uses of the word breast you’ve mentioned– I don’t think I’ve ever heard in day-to-day conversation any man refer to his breast. They would always use the term chest. It sounds like a phrase that was written in books published a long time ago. I don’t really see how red breasted robins or chicken breast is relevant in this discussion about dysphoria in humans. For double breasted suits, I see more of where you’re coming from– but most people who aren’t tailors would simply call it a suit, because that is what it is known more commonly as. The word ‘breast’ is definitely more strongly associated with women than men, which is why it’s use can cause dysphoria and so has led to this alternative term. Again, why is this an issue? People can still refer to their breasts as breasts if they want to.

Why are you so concerned about this creating more difference? The article even states itself that this change has been implemented by trans and non-binary people who have collated feedback from other trans and non-binary people who have accessed the services before (“The work is for us and by us, developed from grassroots research and lived experiences in the trans and non-binary community.”). They wouldn’t implement it if it wasn’t going to be helpful for trans and non-binary people accessing the services.

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