Fahim4
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Geography geology or economics for A levels

Hey really don’t know what to choose for my 3rd subject for a levels. For the course I want to do for uni I need maths and physics a levels so the 3rd option doesn’t really matter but I want to know your options on those 3 subjects. I did a GCSE in geography but I rather learn more about the physical side of it (geology) but is that harder?? I’ve never been taught economics but it sounds like something that could be useful but I don’t know how hard it is.
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econ.person
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Economics at A level isn’t hard if you’re a logical thinker. Some people say it’s like business studies but a bit harder but I disagree.

I done 5 a levels including economics maths and physics. Economics was definitely the easiest, with many of my “less smart” friends getting As (at a state school even).

It really opens doors for you too if you decide that you want to study something else at university!

But given you need maths and physics for your chosen path, you should consider further maths or maybe chemistry.

Having studied at Cambridge and LSE, I can tell you very few people ever studied geology at a level as it’s not well respected. The only students who studied geography were geography students themselves as again it’s not very well respected!
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Fahim4
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(Original post by econ.person)
Economics at A level isn’t hard if you’re a logical thinker. Some people say it’s like business studies but a bit harder but I disagree.

I done 5 a levels including economics maths and physics. Economics was definitely the easiest, with many of my “less smart” friends getting As (at a state school even).

It really opens doors for you too if you decide that you want to study something else at university!

But given you need maths and physics for your chosen path, you should consider further maths or maybe chemistry.

Having studied at Cambridge and LSE, I can tell you very few people ever studied geology at a level as it’s not well respected. The only students who studied geography were geography students themselves as again it’s not very well respected!
Would it be wise to do A level economics if I haven’t done at GCSE. If I do go to uni I would probably do a degree in aerospace engineering
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econ.person
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(Original post by Fahim4)
Would it be wise to do A level economics if I haven’t done at GCSE. If I do go to uni I would probably do a degree in aerospace engineering
Yes, it would be wise, don’t worry! Most who do A-level economics don’t have gcse economics. Why? Because very few schools teach economics at gcse. So it’s completely normal and you’re at no disadvantage. So go for it!

Fun fact: all economics degrees in the UK don’t even require A-level economics, and some economics masters don’t require an economics undergraduate degree. Essentially you can pick up economics at any point along the education system.

Anyway, given your interest in aerospace engineering, I would highly highly advise further maths (which I did do also so I’m speaking from experience). There is a lot of mechanics that you’ll study through maths and further maths combined, which is why you’ll be an impressive applicant to universities when you apply. Also once you get to uni, the transition will be easier as you would’ve covered some of the maths. Almost all engineering degrees are heavy in maths so do consider that.

Many worry that they’ll fail further maths, so maybe take four subjects for one term and see if you want to drop it after Christmas break or in the summer after AS levels. Ask the college you get into if they’re fine with that.

Alternatively, I’d recommend Computer Science or Chemistry. Though not directly relevant, it is a favourable subject for university admissions teams.

Hope this helps.
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Fahim4
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I’ve looked into some of the subject and I would probably choose between economics and computer science but with computer science I barley know anything about programming. I’m willing to learn and I think if I do choose computer science it will be more beneficial but I feel like it will be more difficult than economics.
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Fahim4
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(Original post by econ.person)
Yes, it would be wise, don’t worry! Most who do A-level economics don’t have gcse economics. Why? Because very few schools teach economics at gcse. So it’s completely normal and you’re at no disadvantage. So go for it!

Fun fact: all economics degrees in the UK don’t even require A-level economics, and some economics masters don’t require an economics undergraduate degree. Essentially you can pick up economics at any point along the education system.

Anyway, given your interest in aerospace engineering, I would highly highly advise further maths (which I did do also so I’m speaking from experience). There is a lot of mechanics that you’ll study through maths and further maths combined, which is why you’ll be an impressive applicant to universities when you apply. Also once you get to uni, the transition will be easier as you would’ve covered some of the maths. Almost all engineering degrees are heavy in maths so do consider that.

Many worry that they’ll fail further maths, so maybe take four subjects for one term and see if you want to drop it after Christmas break or in the summer after AS levels. Ask the college you get into if they’re fine with that.

Alternatively, I’d recommend Computer Science or Chemistry. Though not directly relevant, it is a favourable subject for university admissions teams.

Hope this helps.
I’ve looked into some of the subject and I would probably choose between economics and computer science but with computer science I barley know anything about programming. I’m willing to learn and I think if I do choose computer science it will be more beneficial but I feel like it will be more difficult than economics
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econ.person
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(Original post by Fahim4)
I’ve looked into some of the subject and I would probably choose between economics and computer science but with computer science I barley know anything about programming. I’m willing to learn and I think if I do choose computer science it will be more beneficial but I feel like it will be more difficult than economics
I do agree that economics is more accessible than computer science.

There are no real prerequisites for computer science A-level. There is definitely no expectation for existing programming knowledge. You’ll learn it as you go along.

Ask your college if you can take 4 subjects for a few weeks, so you can figure out if you prefer Computer Science or Economics!
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