BlueNova42
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
I'm thinking of getting into doing tutoring so that I can earn some money but I don't know how I can do it?

Like what things do I need to train myself to do, so I can become a good tutor? Like what kinds of resources do I need to make myself, what kinds of teaching techniques and hacks do I need to know, how do i organise my schedule, how do I decide how much I'll be paid every hour?

I'm thinking of doing tutoring in sciences, english, maybe another language, and tutoring for the 11+ exams.


Any help from any other fellow uni students who tutor on the side please let me know.

Thanks
0
reply
MindMax2000
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
Below is the link for the official requirements to becoming an online tutor:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov....s/online-tutor

Whilst I have came across and employed the services of personal tutors without most of what is mentioned, I don't know what the legality of not having the mentioned certifications. If you take teacher training, it would answer most of the questions you have.
0
reply
akshayaax
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
There are many websites which allow you to be a tutor however, they require 10% - 20% of your earnings. If you want to start it personally, as I have, I think you should try using Google Classroom - it's easy to post assignments, home learning activities and stuff. Also the prices depends entirely on how long you teach and how much effort you put in. I charge quite low because it's Covid and many people are struggling to fund for their family so I don't want to take too much from them. However, usually people charge around £5-£20 an hour.
When I tutor students, I usually check their levels first by doing a mini assessment or asking their school grades, that way,as tutors, we know which areas students require help in. This allows us to plan our lesson and make it more effective.
I hope this helps and good luck!
1
reply
Bedaquiline
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 day ago
#4
I know this thread is a bit old but the information in it isn't great, so here's my two cents. I'm a master's student who tutors alongside studying.

Firstly, don't know what the first reply is on about, but it's perfectly legal to tutor without any particular qualification. The second reply is more on the right track but the figures are extremely low; £5/hour is below minimum wage and I've never heard of any reputable tutor working for that little before, whereas £20/hour is normally the minimum I'll work for, and I know people who are paid £45+ /hour. The thing to remember is that you'll spend at least as long preparing for a session as you do tutoring, so your hourly wage (as paid to you) is actually about half that. Also, the issue with tutoring is getting enough hours on your schedule, so the ones you do get should be well-paid. If you're worried about Covid affecting people financially, what I do is offer sliding scale prices - so people who want to can pay me a higher rate, but for those who need help, I offer discounts below my usual minimum rate.

Secondly, the easiest way to get started is via agencies. In order to make a competitive application to an agency and appeal to clients after the agency accepts you, it's useful to volunteer as a tutor (the Coronavirus Tutoring Initiative is how I started) so you have at least some experience. I think you'll want an agency to help you attract clients while you get started in the industry, but they will take a hefty cut of your pay, so eventually freelance might be preferable.

It's useful to consider whether you have any unique skills e.g. there's a lot of demand for Oxbridge graduates who can advise on applying to Oxbridge, which I've done quite a lot of - it's morally dubious but it puts food on the table. I also do a lot of work with international graduate students, such as proof-reading their essays and supporting them with the UK system. I know people who earn a lot as debate coaches or 11+ tutors - the 11+ is a good area to focus on because there's so many free resources online, the tests are easy to teach yourself because they're aimed at 11 year olds, and there's lots of demand.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you feel comfortable going back to school on March 8th?

Yes (317)
32.15%
No (669)
67.85%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise