muhammad0112
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Hi, I want to study for a biomedical sciences degree and I've applied for universities that are IBMS accredited (as I thought it was a good thing) . Now I want to study a degree without that accreditation as I don't intend to work in a lab. Is there any way I can change the universities that I apply to, I've already submitted my application and have gotton offers from 4/5 universites.
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Admit-One
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Hi, I want to study for a biomedical sciences degree and I've applied for universities that are IBMS accredited (as I thought it was a good thing) . Now I want to study a degree without that accreditation as I don't intend to work in a lab. Is there any way I can change the universities that I apply to, I've already submitted my application and have gotton offers from 4/5 universites.
If it’s been more than 14 days since you received your welcome email from UCAS, no, you cannot change your uni’s. Your only option is to decline all your offers and use UCAS Extra.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Admit-One)
If it’s been more than 14 days since you received your welcome email from UCAS, no, you cannot change your uni’s. Your only option is to decline all your offers and use UCAS Extra.
I've submitted my university application 8 days ago - January 29th. That's when I had the "[My name], we've got your application" email from them. What can I do now?
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I've submitted my university application 8 days ago - January 29th. That's when I had the "[My name], we've got your application" email from them. What can I do now?
Is the university of East London a good university? - I got an unconditional offer from them.
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Studentystudent!
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Is the university of East London a good university? - I got an unconditional offer from them.
Meh they’re alright. It depends on your predicted grades. Top Biomed courses are rarely accredited such as RG unis. I did a year of a job accredited course before changing degree and it was alright but because there are no guidelines it’s so broad it was actually useless. There was little opportunity to specialise in any of the years. What do you want to do after uni?
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Studentystudent!)
Meh they’re alright. It depends on your predicted grades. Top Biomed courses are rarely accredited such as RG unis. I did a year of a job accredited course before changing degree and it was alright but because there are no guidelines it’s so broad it was actually useless. There was little opportunity to specialise in any of the years. What do you want to do after uni?
I have no idea, maybe apply for medicine /dentistry? idrk. But I really don't wanna work in a lab. I chose biomed cos I'm interested in the different processes that occur in the human body. So I boiled it down to biomedical sciences, medicine, biological sciences and physiological sciences. I didn't do medicine cos I didn't wanna limit myself too much and I didn't choose physiological sciences as it is so similar to biomedical sciences (from my research). But the issue is that I hate working in a lab. I really hate doing lab practicals at school. I prefer just learning and understanding the content.
Last edited by muhammad0112; 5 months ago
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ashsilva
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I have no idea, maybe apply for medicine /dentistry? idrk. But I really don't wanna work in a lab. I chose biomed cos I'm interested in the different processes that occur in the human body. So I boiled it down to biomedical sciences, medicine, biological sciences and physiological sciences. I didn't do medicine cos I didn't wanna limit myself too much and I didn't choose physiological sciences as it is so similar to biomedical sciences (from my research). But the issue is that I hate working in a lab. I really hate doing lab practicals at school. I prefer just learning and understanding the content.
why not human sciences?
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I've submitted my university application 8 days ago - January 29th. That's when I had the "[My name], we've got your application" email from them. What can I do now?
Call UCAS on Monday morning and ask if you can swap whichever choices you are not happy with. Be certain with your new picks, they likely won’t let you amend them again.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by ashsilva)
why not human sciences?
I just looked it up, the issue is that it also involves social/psychological aspects, which I'm not really a fan of. Also, I doubt I'll get into med/dentistry with a human science degree
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Admit-One)
Call UCAS on Monday morning and ask if you can swap whichever choices you are not happy with. Be certain with your new picks, they likely won’t let you amend them again.
Okay, I'll get tha done
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I have no idea, maybe apply for medicine /dentistry? idrk. But I really don't wanna work in a lab. I chose biomed cos I'm interested in the different processes that occur in the human body. So I boiled it down to biomedical sciences, medicine, biological sciences and physiological sciences. I didn't do medicine cos I didn't wanna limit myself too much and I didn't choose physiological sciences as it is so similar to biomedical sciences (from my research). But the issue is that I hate working in a lab. I really hate doing lab practicals at school. I prefer just learning and understanding the content.
Do you think biomed was the right choice for me?
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ajj2000
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I just looked it up, the issue is that it also involves social/psychological aspects, which I'm not really a fan of. Also, I doubt I'll get into med/dentistry with a human science degree
Are you likely to get the A level grades for med/ den? If so you should consider a year or two out to consider these for your first degree.
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Studentystudent!
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
I have no idea, maybe apply for medicine /dentistry? idrk. But I really don't wanna work in a lab. I chose biomed cos I'm interested in the different processes that occur in the human body. So I boiled it down to biomedical sciences, medicine, biological sciences and physiological sciences. I didn't do medicine cos I didn't wanna limit myself too much and I didn't choose physiological sciences as it is so similar to biomedical sciences (from my research). But the issue is that I hate working in a lab. I really hate doing lab practicals at school. I prefer just learning and understanding the content.
Okay. Well is there an area you prefer? I was the same, not sure what I liked and after trying a few modules I quickly learnt what I like and hate, and because Biomed is so broad I came to hate the degree because I didn’t care about things like anatomy and microbiology, my passion is genetics so now I’m doing a genetics degree. Also graduate medicine (GEM) is like 10 times harder to get on so if you really want to do medicine reapply as an undergrad. What are your favourite things in biology to learn about? And you don’t have to work in a lab after any biological/biomedical science degree. But just so you know Uni lab work is NOTHING like school practicals. There are few degrees in any subject you can do where you don’t have to apply the content that you learn.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Studentystudent!)
Okay. Well is there an area you prefer? I was the same, not sure what I liked and after trying a few modules I quickly learnt what I like and hate, and because Biomed is so broad I came to hate the degree because I didn’t care about things like anatomy and microbiology, my passion is genetics so now I’m doing a genetics degree. Also graduate medicine (GEM) is like 10 times harder to get on so if you really want to do medicine reapply as an undergrad. What are your favourite things in biology to learn about? And you don’t have to work in a lab after any biological/biomedical science degree. But just so you know Uni lab work is NOTHING like school practicals. There are few degrees in any subject you can do where you don’t have to apply the content that you learn.
Okay, well if I had to rank my favourite A level biology topics, it would be:
1. Homeostasis - blood glucose regulation/kidneys
2. The cardiac cylcle/blood vessels/how a heart beat is initiated
3. the nervous system - responding to stimuli
4. biological molecules/nucleic acids - mainly cos of how easy that chapter is
5. The breathing mechanisms of fish, insects + humans
6. The digestive system
7. The immune system + how it works

As you can see I really like systems and how things work. I'm not really into the genetic/microbiology stuff if that helps
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Studentystudent!)
Okay. Well is there an area you prefer? I was the same, not sure what I liked and after trying a few modules I quickly learnt what I like and hate, and because Biomed is so broad I came to hate the degree because I didn’t care about things like anatomy and microbiology, my passion is genetics so now I’m doing a genetics degree. Also graduate medicine (GEM) is like 10 times harder to get on so if you really want to do medicine reapply as an undergrad. What are your favourite things in biology to learn about? And you don’t have to work in a lab after any biological/biomedical science degree. But just so you know Uni lab work is NOTHING like school practicals. There are few degrees in any subject you can do where you don’t have to apply the content that you learn.
Also, what did you mean when you said that uni lab work was nothing like the A-level practicals?
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Studentystudent!
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Also, what did you mean when you said that uni lab work was nothing like the A-level practicals?
School practicals rarely work and the practicals are so basic and boring. They’re much more interesting at uni and with a much wider list of equipment. It’s hard to explain, but they’re just 1000 times better. I hated A level labs too but I like the uni ones.

(Original post by muhammad0112)
Okay, well if I had to rank my favourite A level biology topics, it would be:
1. Homeostasis - blood glucose regulation/kidneys
2. The cardiac cylcle/blood vessels/how a heart beat is initiated
3. the nervous system - responding to stimuli
4. biological molecules/nucleic acids - mainly cos of how easy that chapter is
5. The breathing mechanisms of fish, insects humans
6. The digestive system
7. The immune system how it works

As you can see I really like systems and how things work. I'm not really into the genetic/microbiology stuff if that helps
This is a very broad list. It seems to sum up like half of the A level curriculum. I’m going to ignore the breathing of fish and insects as unless you want to do zoology that’s kind of irrelevant. Have you considered a physiology or physiological science degree? Biomed for example has a lot of microbiology and virology, as well as genetics and cel biology, because at the end of the day genetics and cell biology determines physiology. I did one physiology module in first year and that’s it. It sounds like you’d get rather bored with the degree. Homeostasis comes up in most things, cardiac cycle is rather niche along with the nervous system, so I’ll categorise those as neuroscience, which again you can do as a neuroscience degree, which is rather interesting. The digestive system isn’t really covered in any degree apart from in a physiology module, and the immune system is more linked to cell biology. I suggest you take a look at some neuroscience or neurobiology courses and some physiology or physiological science courses. You can always do Biomed and specialise in a masters if you think you’ll enjoy enough of the modules.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by Studentystudent!)
School practicals rarely work and the practicals are so basic and boring. They’re much more interesting at uni and with a much wider list of equipment. It’s hard to explain, but they’re just 1000 times better. I hated A level labs too but I like the uni ones.



This is a very broad list. It seems to sum up like half of the A level curriculum. I’m going to ignore the breathing of fish and insects as unless you want to do zoology that’s kind of irrelevant. Have you considered a physiology or physiological science degree? Biomed for example has a lot of microbiology and virology, as well as genetics and cel biology, because at the end of the day genetics and cell biology determines physiology. I did one physiology module in first year and that’s it. It sounds like you’d get rather bored with the degree. Homeostasis comes up in most things, cardiac cycle is rather niche along with the nervous system, so I’ll categorise those as neuroscience, which again you can do as a neuroscience degree, which is rather interesting. The digestive system isn’t really covered in any degree apart from in a physiology module, and the immune system is more linked to cell biology. I suggest you take a look at some neuroscience or neurobiology courses and some physiology or physiological science courses. You can always do Biomed and specialise in a masters if you think you’ll enjoy enough of the modules.
Can I still study for medecine or dentistry if I wanted to?
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ecolier
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Are you likely to get the A level grades for med/ den? If so you should consider a year or two out to consider these for your first degree.
Shame that your reply - which is absolutely right, is ignored. :yy: :yy:

(Original post by muhammad0112)
Can I still study for medecine or dentistry if I wanted to?
It's going to be super hard. Listen to ajj2000 - even if you have an inkling of wanting to do Medicine, take a gap year to re-evaluate and apply to standard undergrad medicine.

For GEM you're going to need a national top UCAT score (top 10-20%) or a high GAMSAT score. The vast majority of med schools will also need a 2:1 or better, which isn't the easiest thing to achieve.

Alternatively you can apply as a grad to standard undergrad medicine - with no financial support towards the tuition fees at all but slightly less competitive than GEM (but still much more competitive than school leavers). You'd have to pay £9250 per year upfront, with no student loans available for this.
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muhammad0112
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(Original post by ajj2000)
Are you likely to get the A level grades for med/ den? If so you should consider a year or two out to consider these for your first degree.
Whoops, I'm tired so I was gonna get back to that reply then completely forgot about it.

I highly doubt it, I'm predicted BBC. But that's because I can't really study at home. I'm not really sure what grades I'll get for my mocks in March
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by muhammad0112)
Can I still study for medecine or dentistry if I wanted to?
Just to add to what @ecolier said, I’d try and choose between medicine and dentistry. Secure some work experience if you’re unsure and try to learn more about both. Whilst dentistry has a heavy medical foundation, it has a large practical aspect and vastly different way of working. The two subjects are not interchangeable with each other.
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