Hadanap
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Hi, thanks for doing this. I’m applying to the part time distance learning BSc in Economics with the Uni of London, but the course is accredited and written by LSE, do you know anything about the differences between your course and this one at all?Also I’d really love to get your opinion on what I could read or study to prepare myself for economics with LSE Many thanks!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by certi_db)
can I read your personal statement? and can I get into lse for economics with average/bad GCSE grades but good a-level grades and a good personal statement?
Really sorry, I cannot share my personal statement, but I am sure you can find plenty of LSE personal statements out there, which I personally found very useful when writing my own. Note down the things they have in common and try to understand what makes them prefer one over another. The key to writing a personal statement is to avoid being vague, and instead, show that you've done research and put in effort when deciding that you wanted to study economics. By that I mean, it's always a good thing to, for example, speak about a certain economic concept or theory that has sparked YOUR interest or impacted YOU as a person. Do not talk about how you want to end poverty and that's why you want to study economics because you wouldn't really be convincing anyone here. Instead, talk about a certain economists' view on how we achieve economic growth, talk about why that view was so interesting to you, contradict it, relate it to an experience of yours, etc. You need to tell a story and make everything as personal as possible.

Taken from LSE's website:
'A strong set of GCSE grades including the majority at A (or 7) and A* (or 8-9)
Your GCSE (or equivalent) English Language and Mathematics grades should be no lower than B (or 6).
We also consider your overall GCSE subject profile'
So you can see they do not need to be perfect by any means, just decent grades. I would say that if your GCSE grades are a little lower than that, then that's obviously not so great, but it definitely does not rule you out. The key here is having strong and solid A-level grades.

Hope this helps
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Anonymous #1
#43
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(Original post by Hadanap)
Hi, thanks for doing this. I’m applying to the part time distance learning BSc in Economics with the Uni of London, but the course is accredited and written by LSE, do you know anything about the differences between your course and this one at all?Also I’d really love to get your opinion on what I could read or study to prepare myself for economics with LSE Many thanks!
To be honest, I don't really know much about the course, but they should definitely have a lot in common for sure. I'd be happy to have a look at the course content and let you know about the differences, perhaps just send a link for me to see.
In terms of preparing for the degree, you could definitely brush up on your mathematical (so complex differentiation, integration, turning points, matrices, etc) and statistical skills. Personally, I only did my stats papers for maths and further maths in year 12 so it was definitely a long time before starting uni at LSE, and I had to spend a little more time trying to remember things, compared to others haha. If you've done econ at A-level, then you should be fine, but if not, then maybe do have a look at econ textbooks (and I am guessing you can probably access the reading list for the econ module(s) in the first year, so do use that one.) But to be honest, only do these things if you're very very keen on being prepared, the courses take a very gradual approach, and as long as you keep up, you'll most definitely be fine. Good luck with your application!
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Anonymous #1
#44
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Really sorry, I cannot share my personal statement, but I am sure you can find plenty of LSE personal statements out there, which I personally found very useful when writing my own. Note down the things they have in common and try to understand what makes them prefer one over another. The key to writing a personal statement is to avoid being vague, and instead, show that you've done research and put in effort when deciding that you wanted to study economics. By that I mean, it's always a good thing to, for example, speak about a certain economic concept or theory that has sparked YOUR interest or impacted YOU as a person. Do not talk about how you want to end poverty and that's why you want to study economics because you wouldn't really be convincing anyone here. Instead, talk about a certain economists' view on how we achieve economic growth, talk about why that view was so interesting to you, contradict it, relate it to an experience of yours, etc. You need to tell a story and make everything as personal as possible.

Taken from LSE's website:
'A strong set of GCSE grades including the majority at A (or 7) and A* (or 8-9)
Your GCSE (or equivalent) English Language and Mathematics grades should be no lower than B (or 6).
We also consider your overall GCSE subject profile'
So you can see they do not need to be perfect by any means, just decent grades. I would say that if your GCSE grades are a little lower than that, then that's obviously not so great, but it definitely does not rule you out. The key here is having strong and solid A-level grades.

Hope this helps
sorry, meant to say 'criticize it' not 'contradict it' haha.
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Anonymous #6
#45
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Hey, thanks for doing this AMA. How easy do you think it is to manage a good social life with the academic rigour? I have also heard that international students tend to be quite cliquey and stay amongst themselves. What's your opinion on this?
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Anonymous #1
#46
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#46
(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey, thanks for doing this AMA. How easy do you think it is to manage a good social life with the academic rigour? I have also heard that international students tend to be quite cliquey and stay amongst themselves. What's your opinion on this?
In terms of social life, I know people who go out multiple times a week, are active members in about 3 or 4 societies and normal members in another 3 whilst still maintaining excellent grades. By active I mean, holding positions of responsibility and leadership. To be honest, this all depends on how you manage your time and how quickly and efficiently you can do the academic side of the university. But, the short answer is, yes its possible to be a part of a sports team and plenty of societies, go out with friends and still have solid grades.

LSE is very known for the large number and portion of international students that study at university. It's very international and while you have people from so so many different parts and countries of the world, you do see a considerable large fraction of Asians (China and Malaysia in particular) among students, this is especially the case in more quantitative courses that require a lot of maths. But not so much in qualitative ones really. This does have its advantages, such as the fact that you'll get to meet people coming from different cultures and backgrounds but this can sometimes not be the greatest thing, because students from certain countries do tend to stick together and don't really interact with a lot of 'outsiders.' But it's worth mentioning, that this isn't that big of an issue because generally, everyone is so keen on making friends from different backgrounds like I said, that you won't really care or bother with those that aren't
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econ.person
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#47
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(Original post by Hadanap)
Hi, thanks for doing this. I’m applying to the part time distance learning BSc in Economics with the Uni of London, but the course is accredited and written by LSE, do you know anything about the differences between your course and this one at all?Also I’d really love to get your opinion on what I could read or study to prepare myself for economics with LSE Many thanks!
Just want to clarify that this degree only takes direction from LSE, but is not awarded or accredited by LSE.

Any mention of LSE on your cv or socials would be deceit. This degree is awarded by UoL only.

The content is basically old module syllabuses recycled. It’s also more accessible to a wider range of students as the exams are easier so you don’t need to “prepare yourself for LSE”.
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Hadanap
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(Original post by econ.person)
Just want to clarify that this degree only takes direction from LSE, but is not awarded or accredited by LSE.

Any mention of LSE on your cv or socials would be deceit. This degree is awarded by UoL only.

The content is basically old module syllabuses recycled. It’s also more accessible to a wider range of students as the exams are easier so you don’t need to “prepare yourself for LSE”.
Wow thanks for pointing that out, I wasn’t aware of this so it may change things for me, I’ve been speaking to an admissions councillor this week and I’ve not asked the question as my assumption was wrong.

May I ask if you have any thoughts on UoL as an institution and do you know if future employers would find this course worthwhile? I know a financial advisor who has told me that in finance employers only really want graduates from a Russell group university...
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Anonymous #7
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Hey, it’s so great that ur doing this! My qs r...

1) did u apply with predicteds or achieved grades? If predicteds, what were they?
2) I’m hoping to receive an offer for Law but also have interests in IB, wld u say this is looked down upon at LSE since I wouldn’t be studying economics? (I’m doing a level maths tho)
3) u must get this one a lot but is the social life RLLY that bad? I was so excited to meet ppl from around the world who r ambitious, driven and interesting but apparently there r so many cliques? I’m a home student n wld love to make friends w everyone btw.
4) I’m aware that places like Goldman sachs recruit, globally, from LSE the most, do u think this is bc of the many applications LSE make and is the reality that only a few ppl get internships or is LSE rlly a IB factory?

Thanks
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econ.person
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(Original post by Hadanap)
Wow thanks for pointing that out, I wasn’t aware of this so it may change things for me, I’ve been speaking to an admissions councillor this week and I’ve not asked the question as my assumption was wrong.

May I ask if you have any thoughts on UoL as an institution and do you know if future employers would find this course worthwhile? I know a financial advisor who has told me that in finance employers only really want graduates from a Russell group university...
You're welcome! I don't know anyone who's graduated with a UoL degree, as it's aimed at international students who can't or don't want to leave their country. I am UK based and not many people do UoL degrees here (especially for their first degree).

There are some colleges in countries like Pakistan who are accredited to teach these courses, though none of them are actual lecturers (meaning no PhDs graduates), nor do any of these colleges have links to specific universities like LSE, only UoL. I assume they have to give UoL a share of their fees for teaching UoL courses.

UoL degree are not as respected as an on-campus degree, though, for a distance learning degree, it is very popular. Probably top with Open University, which you should also consider. You can also look into Uni of the People and Arden University, though I don't know much about these.

UoL is a group of universities, which only some members are Russel Group members. The UoL itself is not a member of the RG. You may fool an employer to thinking that you studied at LSE, but again this is dishonest and would likely lead to immediate dismissal once you were found out. Your best for a finance job is to study in the UK anywhere, get good grades, then do a master's at a RG uni if possible.

For more information on the UoL's structure, search up the Wikipedia page for it. There is good detail there.
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Anonymous #8
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Hi, thank you for doing this! I just have 2 questions:
1) What advantage would you say LSE has over other top unis like UCL and Warwick?
2) I also applied to Economics without having done A Level Economics. How do you think you managed to convey your passion for economics effectively in your PS and make up for the fact that you didn't take it at A Level? Would you say that your PS lacked certain economic sophistication and knowledge that other PS may have as you haven't actually studied economics yourself?
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Hadanap
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(Original post by econ.person)
You're welcome! I don't know anyone who's graduated with a UoL degree, as it's aimed at international students who can't or don't want to leave their country. I am UK based and not many people do UoL degrees here (especially for their first degree).

There are some colleges in countries like Pakistan who are accredited to teach these courses, though none of them are actual lecturers (meaning no PhDs graduates), nor do any of these colleges have links to specific universities like LSE, only UoL. I assume they have to give UoL a share of their fees for teaching UoL courses.

UoL degree are not as respected as an on-campus degree, though, for a distance learning degree, it is very popular. Probably top with Open University, which you should also consider. You can also look into Uni of the People and Arden University, though I don't know much about these.

UoL is a group of universities, which only some members are Russel Group members. The UoL itself is not a member of the RG. You may fool an employer to thinking that you studied at LSE, but again this is dishonest and would likely lead to immediate dismissal once you were found out. Your best for a finance job is to study in the UK anywhere, get good grades, then do a master's at a RG uni if possible.

For more information on the UoL's structure, search up the Wikipedia page for it. There is good detail there.
This has clarified a lot so thank you, I really appreciate the in depth response. I’m currently part way through an access course with the open uni so I was going with their economics course until I saw UoL’s course and wanted to take that because of the world standing of LSE in economics, but from what you’ve said it unfortunately doesn’t hold the weight I had thought.

It seems unless I am willing to change my working hours I have the three choices of OU, UoL and Arden - would you hazard any advice as to which would be better for future employers?

I ask this because I’m a mature student at 33 and potentially not quite as sought after because I come into education rather late, I feel like I need the best start possible.
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econ.person
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#53
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(Original post by Hadanap)
This has clarified a lot so thank you, I really appreciate the in depth response. I’m currently part way through an access course with the open uni so I was going with their economics course until I saw UoL’s course and wanted to take that because of the world standing of LSE in economics, but from what you’ve said it unfortunately doesn’t hold the weight I had thought.

It seems unless I am willing to change my working hours I have the three choices of OU, UoL and Arden - would you hazard any advice as to which would be better for future employers?

I ask this because I’m a mature student at 33 and potentially not quite as sought after because I come into education rather late, I feel like I need the best start possible.
Given your age and I assume long time away from full time academia, I would advise OU. They are much more prepared for students of your type. Arden is new and very unknown.

Again, I feel like I'm stealing this AMA and the conversation is drifting in a completely different direction, so feel free to message me privately or start your own thread and tag me for a response.
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lau11041104
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Currently, a second-year economics student at LSE and would love to help and answer some questions that people out here may have. So ask anything related to economics, LSE, London or anything really
..
Last edited by lau11041104; 1 month ago
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EconomicsStud3nt
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What's so good about LSE?
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Anonymous #6
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Hey, I'm currently looking at LSE Accomodation and I am currently stuck between single room in Passfield or Carr-Saunders. What would you say are the pros and cons of each hall and which do you think is better?
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