Politically participating members of TSR, where do you think your views originated?

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V℮rsions
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Try not to argue with each other in the replies, just curious and bored.
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glassalice
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Life experiences.
The realisation that the world doesn't give a **** about you.

Having all of my rights taken away, made me sceptical about government/ agencies interfering in people's lives and about their motives. I cherish the rights of the individual.

Although I respect the work that many doctors and nurses do, I do not share a sense of national pride for the NHS.

My Dad's traditional 'red brick labour' views influence me greatly, more so in the past. However I retain a deep sense of hatred actually towards identity politics that many traditional (potentially ex) labour voters share.
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Rakas21
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Hard to say, mainly life experiences, background and interest.

I became interested in the stock market at a basic level as young as 12 from watching the news and developed a basic political interest around 16. Most of my social views at the time were fairly typical for a northern man having grown up in British poverty but my economic views were very much a reaction to both my ambition and aspiration at the time (I knew I was smart) and the policies of the then Labour government (I was a raging true blue Tory).

How my views have developed since then are much more down to education, life experience (I've become less ideologically attached and partisan) and practicality. I still retain a lot of the same principles though (belief in the market over government, belief in basic liberty and minimal state intervention).
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MatureStudent37
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Life.

I grew up in a strong labour household. Maggie was evil, trade unions were great and everybody was equal.

Fast forward a few years. Left home, got a degree. Joined the army, saw some of the world. Went back to uni again. Got married to a wonderful woman and had kids.

My politics have shifted from left to right with agar which is normal.

My views however have been shaped by a love of watching historical documentaries, listening on fascination to the war generation growing up, a severe distrust of politicians and ‘experts’ who I’ve seen waste blood and treasure, a desire to provide for my family and a wish to be self reliant.

I’ve learnt that those on the left try and portray a sense of virtuous belief in their ideals but are normally driven by greed. A realisation that the world is not a nice place, and the problems we have in the U.K. and the west pail into insignificance compared to most of the world. Our culture, belief and freedom doesn’t copy over to the rest of the world and national stereotypes are based on reality.
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Theloniouss
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Somewhere in my brain, I imagine
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JOSH4598
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Personally I think it's partly based on an individual's human nature, which is often influenced by your parents as you grow up. There are some people who are more self-centred and would therefore be right-leaning vs people who want to help others and would therefore be more left-leaning.

That's probably why so many young people rave about being left-wing, as they feel they can help everyone and want to make the world drastically better (albeit in their minds). Fast-forward to when people are mid-way through their lives, they become more right-leaning when they realise they can't transform the world and they they are just one tiny cog in a big machine, and therefore focus on their own lives and prosperity.
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64Lightbulbs
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queer leftists
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Max1989
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Life and reading, trying to piece together political ideas taking the best bits from left and right and really thinking hard whether they would actually work and if so how the would work, I day dream about political things a lot and try to find reasoning either psychologically, economically or culturally behind each avenue that can be taken, and the economic and sociological impact of them.

My views are completely through my own logic and reasoning, no outside sources influenced me other than my mind and the words I read, like yes those words might be slightly biased at times but I try and stay objective and read both sides of a situation and almost always research the authors beforehand.
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Theloniouss
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
Personally I think it's partly based on an individual's human nature, which is often influenced by your parents as you grow up. There are some people who are more self-centred and would therefore be right-leaning vs people who want to help others and would therefore be more left-leaning.

That's probably why so many young people rave about being left-wing, as they feel they can help everyone and want to make the world drastically better (albeit in their minds). Fast-forward to when people are mid-way through their lives, they become more right-leaning when they realise they can't transform the world and they they are just one tiny cog in a big machine, and therefore focus on their own lives and prosperity.
Many right-wingers have caused considerable societal change in the hopes of helping people. Lots of left-wingers sit around jerking off about how empathetic they are while their beliefs and actions have no impact on society. Not sure your "selfish/empathetic" view of politics actually holds up in real life.
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JOSH4598
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(Original post by Theloniouss)
Many right-wingers have caused considerable societal change in the hopes of helping people. Lots of left-wingers sit around jerking off about how empathetic they are while their beliefs and actions have no impact on society. Not sure your "selfish/empathetic" view of politics actually holds up in real life.
Quite possibly, but as a rule of thumb right-wing parties generally want to maintain the status quo, while left-wing parties want to change pretty much every policy going. Whether or not they're successful in achieving those aims is another matter; I do agree though that the Left are often all talk and no action.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
Quite possibly, but as a rule of thumb right-wing parties generally want to maintain the status quo, while left-wing parties want to change pretty much every policy going. Whether or not they're successful in achieving those aims is another matter; I do agree though that the Left are often all talk and no action.
Worth saying that's because they are in opposition across swathes of the west rather than government.

I mean Trudeo and Macron are considered to be of the left and if anything they are just Lib Dem's in British terms.

Opposition's are usually much more radical than governments because they rail against a status quo.
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MatureStudent37
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(Original post by JOSH4598)
Quite possibly, but as a rule of thumb right-wing parties generally want to maintain the status quo, while left-wing parties want to change pretty much every policy going. Whether or not they're successful in achieving those aims is another matter; I do agree though that the Left are often all talk and no action.
I’ve found Milton Friedman’s explanation seems to ring true through personal experience of left wing agendas.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5Wx5PYZIWcQ
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Joleee
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combination of my personality and the fact that my dad is a conservative, my mom a liberal and i grew up in a patriarchal household, a patriarchal church which i attended three nights a week, a working class neighborhood where no one had a university degree, and also the media.

i'm by birth a rebellious person, so if you tell me to do something or believe something, i'll do the opposite just so i can feel i've come up with my own idea (yeah right, like that's a thing :rolleyes:). i was told from a young age that men are the head of society and women are the supporting characters whose role in life was to have sex with and raise children, but even as a five year old kid i knew that didn't add up and i started calling myself a feminist as soon as i learned the word. i would say i lean socially and economically left (although depends where you hold the median) because i know not everyone is born with the same advantage (i sure wasn't being female and working class) and i believe Jesus was a socialist who would never let someone die in the gutter just because they are struggling or because they are different; we have to take care of each other regardless, otherwise why are we here(?).
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Starship Trooper
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combination of my personality and the fact that my mum and my other mom are both Trotskyists and i grew up in a feminist household, a ultra liberal church which i attended three nights a week, a upper class neighborhood where everyone had a university degree, and also the media esp The Guardian.

i'm by birth a rebellious person, so if you tell me to do something or believe something, i'll do the opposite just so i can feel i've come up with my own idea (yeah right, like that's a thing :rolleyes:). i was told from a young age that men are evil particularly white men and women are goddesses who don't need them , but even as a five year old kid i knew that didn't add up and i started calling myself a Reactionary as soon as i learned the word. i would say i lean socially and economically right (although depends where you hold the median) because i know everyone is born with the same natural rights (especially me) and I believe Jesus was a reactionary who would condemn people to hell for not following him; we have to take care of ourselves and overcome individual hardship, otherwise why are we here(?).
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by glassalice)
Life experiences.
The realisation that the world doesn't give a **** about you.

Having all of my rights taken away, made me sceptical about government/ agencies interfering in people's lives and about their motives. I cherish the rights of the individual.

Although I respect the work that many doctors and nurses do, I do not share a sense of national pride for the NHS.

My Dad's traditional 'red brick labour' views influence me greatly, more so in the past. However I retain a deep sense of hatred actually towards identity politics that many traditional (potentially ex) labour voters share.
I agree with this tbh. Especially relate to the first 2 when I started working full-time - and my family have always been Labour supporters which I never bothered questioning until after I started working.
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Napp
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Life experience mainly, followed by family/friends politics and having 3 degrees in the varying topics of it.
But primarily life experience. Be it in terms of not wanting to see my taxes sky rocket or not believing the horse **** that political parties and their odious activists would have us swallow.
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Starship Trooper
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(Original post by Napp)
Life experience mainly, followed by family/friends politics and having 3 degrees in the varying topics of it.
But primarily life experience. Be it in terms of not wanting to see my taxes sky rocket or not believing the horse **** that political parties and their odious activists would have us swallow.
You're a kiwi right? What party do you vote for there?
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MatureStudent37
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(Original post by glassalice)
Life experiences.
The realisation that the world doesn't give a **** about you.

Having all of my rights taken away, made me sceptical about government/ agencies interfering in people's lives and about their motives. I cherish the rights of the individual.

Although I respect the work that many doctors and nurses do, I do not share a sense of national pride for the NHS.

My Dad's traditional 'red brick labour' views influence me greatly, more so in the past. However I retain a deep sense of hatred actually towards identity politics that many traditional (potentially ex) labour voters share.
A good post.

May I ask what rights you felt have been taken away from you?
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glassalice
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(Original post by MatureStudent37)
A good post.

May I ask what rights you felt have been taken away from you?
I was held under the MHA for 2 years. All of my rights where taken off me- I would have had more rights in prison.
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MatureStudent37
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(Original post by glassalice)
I was held under the MHA for 2 years. All of my rights where taken off me- I would have had more rights in prison.
I’m sorry to here that. I hope you’re in the mend now. Started the long journey or recovery and/or adjusting to dealing with it.

I know it can be difficult, and fortunately we as a society are becoming more aware of the issues affecting MH, more aware of MH and more supportive of MH. I’ve recently had issues myself. 10 or 15 years back o would never able dared to mention them. Now there’s no shame.

I’ve had personal experience of the MHA at play with both friends and family. I realise that for the person directly involved it can be repressive. For those loved ones around the person directly involved it can be a relief for those others involved.

The MHA isn’t invoked lightly. It’s only ever invoked when there’s a severe risk of the individual causing harm to either themselves or to others.

I’ve seen it used twice. Once with a cousin who at the time had undiagnosed bi polar disorder. The second was to a very good friend who we didn’t know if he would end up killing him self other deciding to kill others in the process.
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