adamski23
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Hello,

I have been searching through all available criminology courses and there are few. Looking at the modules however, they all seem the same to me (95% module are same). Could someone explain if there is a real difference between them and taking one over another would benefit myself in any way?

Examples:
BA Criminology
BA Criminology with Psychology
BA Criminology with Sociology
BA Criminology Criminal Justice
BA Criminology Policing and Investigation.
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Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador)
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(Original post by adamski23)
Hello,

I have been searching through all available criminology courses and there are few. Looking at the modules however, they all seem the same to me (95% module are same). Could someone explain if there is a real difference between them and taking one over another would benefit myself in any way?

Examples:
BA Criminology
BA Criminology with Psychology
BA Criminology with Sociology
BA Criminology Criminal Justice
BA Criminology Policing and Investigation.
Hi there adamski23

I studied Sociology with Criminology for my undergraduate degree and you are right that at first glance, many of these courses can look to be similar. This is because almost all of them fall under the field of social science and there is a large cross over with a wide range of subject. However, a deeper look shows that there are many differences.

For example:
Criminology as a pure subject will solely focus on crime, its origins, its causes and the like. Very much what you would expect.
Criminology when combined with sociology will provide you with modules that do not take into consideration crime, but other aspects of society. Many of these can be linked back to crime however they do not always need to be. This can open up many doors in terms of subjects of study and careers. For example, a criminology module I took explored prisons, how they are run, what changed can be made and more. While my sociology module at the time was on Gender, sexuality and feminism within society. Other modules where available such as education, religion or even social theory.
When criminology is combined with psychology the focus will be on the individual rather than the wider society like in sociology. You may have modules on the mind of the criminal, or nature vs nurture of murderers. Psychology will also lend itself to a much more science based view due to its nature. There is some debate about if psychology is a medical science or a social science.
When combined with policing there will be a specific focus on that given area, the role of the police in crime, wider society, how they function.

As you can see there are differences so the best question to ask yourself is what aspect of crime/social science do you want to specialise in? Wider society? The individual? The police.
However, as you say there is a large cross over across these subjects, as with also social science. You would also likely cover fields of anthropology, philosophy, politics, economics, theology, mathematics and more.

I hope this helps some what and don't hesitate to ask should you have any more questions!
All the best
Cat, York St John University Ambassador
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bluemashmellow
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what about criminal and corporate investigation?

what jobs can you get from this particular degree

(Original post by Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador))
Hi there adamski23

I studied Sociology with Criminology for my undergraduate degree and you are right that at first glance, many of these courses can look to be similar. This is because almost all of them fall under the field of social science and there is a large cross over with a wide range of subject. However, a deeper look shows that there are many differences.

For example:
Criminology as a pure subject will solely focus on crime, its origins, its causes and the like. Very much what you would expect.
Criminology when combined with sociology will provide you with modules that do not take into consideration crime, but other aspects of society. Many of these can be linked back to crime however they do not always need to be. This can open up many doors in terms of subjects of study and careers. For example, a criminology module I took explored prisons, how they are run, what changed can be made and more. While my sociology module at the time was on Gender, sexuality and feminism within society. Other modules where available such as education, religion or even social theory.
When criminology is combined with psychology the focus will be on the individual rather than the wider society like in sociology. You may have modules on the mind of the criminal, or nature vs nurture of murderers. Psychology will also lend itself to a much more science based view due to its nature. There is some debate about if psychology is a medical science or a social science.
When combined with policing there will be a specific focus on that given area, the role of the police in crime, wider society, how they function.

As you can see there are differences so the best question to ask yourself is what aspect of crime/social science do you want to specialise in? Wider society? The individual? The police.
However, as you say there is a large cross over across these subjects, as with also social science. You would also likely cover fields of anthropology, philosophy, politics, economics, theology, mathematics and more.

I hope this helps some what and don't hesitate to ask should you have any more questions!
All the best
Cat, York St John University Ambassador
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Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador)
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(Original post by bluemashmellow)
what about criminal and corporate investigation?

what jobs can you get from this particular degree
Hi again bluemarshmellow,

I don't know the ins and outs of this particular degree but some research tells me that as far as job prospects are concerned they would very much seem to be in a similar ball pack to the other degrees listed. For example, you could look at entering the police force and becoming a cybercrime investigator, criminal investigator, financial crime investigator, etc. Or there could be opportunities within the prison system if that was something you were interested in.

I hope this helps,
Cat, York St John University Student Ambassador
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