Should I take DT A level over Chemistry if i want to study at a top uni?

Watch
Interesting name
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
So i'm getting really confused as to which A level i want to have as my 3rd option as i've heard that DT is useless at A level and you get taught most of the content when you go to Uni. I enjoy DT but i also want to go to a top uni down in London, but i'm not sure what other options i have?
0
reply
stephsmhb
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 months ago
#2
(Original post by Interesting name)
So i'm getting really confused as to which A level i want to have as my 3rd option as i've heard that DT is useless at A level and you get taught most of the content when you go to Uni. I enjoy DT but i also want to go to a top uni down in London, but i'm not sure what other options i have?
What are your other 2 alevels. What grades are you getting in gcse chemistry/science
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#3
(Original post by stephsmhb)
What are your other 2 alevels. What grades are you getting in gcse chemistry/science
Maths and Physics, I have been getting 7,8s and 9s in maths, physics and chemistry
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 months ago
#4
What is it you want to apply to, is I think the key question. If you wanted to apply to a product design course, DT might be very useful or relevant; for something like engineering, it generally isn't specifically helpful (although for most engineering disciplines, chemistry isn't either other than generally giving you more experience of working in a scientific, experimental paradigm). If you wanted to apply to something completely different, like business management, then it probably doesn't matter which you take though.
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
What is it you want to apply to, is I think the key question. If you wanted to apply to a product design course, DT might be very useful or relevant; for something like engineering, it generally isn't specifically helpful (although for most engineering disciplines, chemistry isn't either other than generally giving you more experience of working in a scientific, experimental paradigm). If you wanted to apply to something completely different, like business management, then it probably doesn't matter which you take though.
Im interested in studying Electrical and Electronic engineering, design engineering, software engineering, architecture or mechanical engineering a Uni
0
reply
stephsmhb
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 months ago
#6
(Original post by Interesting name)
Maths and Physics, I have been getting 7,8s and 9s in maths, physics and chemistry
Honestly it depends what you want to do. If you want to do something stem then chemistry would be better but honestly if you prefer dt then take it. Its really dependent on what uni courses you want to do
0
reply
stephsmhb
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 months ago
#7
(Original post by Interesting name)
Im interested in studying Electrical and Electronic engineering, design engineering, software engineering, architecture or mechanical engineering a Uni
If this is the case then it differs uni by uni but just maths and physics should be fine. For architchture and design engineering then DT will be better. Alot of the top uni's like to see further maths for engineering, so you should consider that
0
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 months ago
#8
(Original post by Interesting name)
Im interested in studying Electrical and Electronic engineering, design engineering, software engineering, architecture or mechanical engineering a Uni
DT would be more useful than chemistry for all of those
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 months ago
#9
(Original post by Interesting name)
Im interested in studying Electrical and Electronic engineering, design engineering, software engineering, architecture or mechanical engineering a Uni
Those are all vastly different courses. You should try and figure out if you want to go down the design route (e.g. architecture or desig engineering) or the engineering route (the rest). For the engineering route A-level Further Maths would be most useful, followed somewhat distantly by chemistry. Chemistry isn't incredibly relevant to mechE (some aspects of physical chemistry may apply to thermodynamics, and some other elements may relate to some basic aspects of materials) and is pretty wholly irrelevant to EE. DT is probably about as relevant for mechE as chemistry though.

For design engineering or architecture DT may be helpful. Many architecture courses prefer or require some artistic or design background. Usually the emphasis is on creative design though, with some (like UCL) focusing almost purely on the creative aspects which may be best realised in fine art type contexts.

For software engineering, which is just computer science focused a little more on the programming side, neither option is remotely relevant and A-level Further Maths by far and away is the most relevant and preferred option for that course. Software engineering has nothing to do with "engineering" generally though.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 5 months ago
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#10
(Original post by stephsmhb)
If this is the case then it differs uni by uni but just maths and physics should be fine. For architchture and design engineering then DT will be better. Alot of the top uni's like to see further maths for engineering, so you should consider that
My teachers basically said in other words that i'm not up to the level where i should consider taking further maths but i'm determined to self study further maths to a degree in hopes gaining an advantage and hopefully that will help me get into a top uni, such as Imperial College London. Can you tell me if self studying is worth it in terms of that it will be recognised by uni's?
0
reply
stephsmhb
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 months ago
#11
(Original post by Interesting name)
My teachers basically said in other words that i'm not up to the level where i should consider taking further maths but i'm determined to self study further maths to a degree in hopes gaining an advantage and hopefully that will help me get into a top uni, such as Imperial College London. Can you tell me if self studying is worth it in terms of that it will be recognised by uni's?
Well if you self study and take the exam externally then you will still have the qualification and so it will be considered the same as if you took it in school.
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#12
(Original post by stephsmhb)
Well if you self study and take the exam externally then you will still have the qualification and so it will be considered the same as if you took it in school.
How do I take it externally?
0
reply
stephsmhb
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 months ago
#13
(Original post by Interesting name)
How do I take it externally?
You basically have to find an exam centre which is essentially just a hall which the exam board says is suitable to sit exams in. If your school is nice they may let you use them as an exam centre but you can honestly just type in exam centres near me on google and you should find one. Then contact the exam centre and they should tell you how much you have to pay to sit the exam (my friend paid £100 but the price differs).
Hope that helps, feel free to ask me any more questions
0
reply
EV16
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 months ago
#14
(Original post by Interesting name)
Im interested in studying Electrical and Electronic engineering, design engineering, software engineering, architecture or mechanical engineering a Uni
I'm in year 12/ or first year college right now and I'm looking to do architecture at uni. I do maths art and engineering at a-level. If you're really interested in Architecture I'd say take DT as its going to be a lot more useful to you in the future. You will also make things on that course which you will be able to include in your portfolio, showing things you have designed/made - unis like to see that. Its a good subject to have along side maths and a science.
0
reply
Interesting name
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#15
Thank you for your reply, yes I think I will take DT because i also find it quite enjoyable, I'm still debating on whether or not i can handle taking Further Maths at A level as I don't want to take and only to find out that I can't keep up or handle the workload/perform well.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Poll: What factors affect your mental health most right now? Post-lockdown edition

Anxiousness about restrictions easing (29)
5.48%
Uncertainty around my education (61)
11.53%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (64)
12.1%
Lack of purpose or motivation (69)
13.04%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (29)
5.48%
Impact lockdown had on physical health (24)
4.54%
Social worries (incl. loneliness/making friends) (56)
10.59%
Financial worries (32)
6.05%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (20)
3.78%
Exposure to negative news/social media (33)
6.24%
Difficulty accessing real life entertainment (15)
2.84%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (53)
10.02%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (44)
8.32%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise