What should be done to help you catch up on lost school time?

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Poll: What's the best way to help you catch up on lost school time?
Summer school (103)
13.79%
One-to-one tutoring sessions (250)
33.47%
Repeat the school year (118)
15.8%
Extended school days (91)
12.18%
Increased wellbeing support (185)
24.77%
BlinkyBill
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#1
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#1
There's been a bit of talk in the media this week about how the government might plan to help kids catch up on lost school time, following months of lockdowns.

So what do you think is the best way?

Would you take advantage of the offers of help?

Can you think of anything that might stop kids who need it accessing this help?
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Yewfelle
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All this talk of "helping kids catch up" seems to be under the assumption that anything was actually learned in school to begin with. All this talk of an extended school day is absurd - kids should not be locked up all day at school! They need time to rest and recover, the school day was long enough as it is. No, what is truly needed is a complete overhaul of the entire system. Turn towards lifelong learning, not cramming kids with useless trivia. Less focus on exams. A more relaxed and calm school environment. Option for kids to learn from home virtually and recordings of classes to be made available to all who wish to stay at home rather than go in - even long after covid has passed this would have been a lifesaver for me and many others had it been an option sooner.

There hasn't been any "missed learning" due to the pandemic. Quite the contrary, kids have learned useful life lessons and gained valuable experience - memories of living through a pandemic which will be key in preventing/minimising the effects of the next. And alas, no changes will come to the education system anyway, thanks to the Tories (though Labour are no better on this front)
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V℮rsions
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Lets be realistic here - wellbeing support isn't going to make up for lost time.
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Random_101
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repeating the school year would be my 13th reason
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BlinkyBill
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(Original post by Yewfelle)
All this talk of "helping kids catch up" seems to be under the assumption that anything was actually learned in school to begin with. All this talk of an extended school day is absurd - kids should not be locked up all day at school! They need time to rest and recover, the school day was long enough as it is. No, what is truly needed is a complete overhaul of the entire system. Turn towards lifelong learning, not cramming kids with useless trivia. Less focus on exams. A more relaxed and calm school environment. Option for kids to learn from home virtually and recordings of classes to be made available to all who wish to stay at home rather than go in - even long after covid has passed this would have been a lifesaver for me and many others had it been an option sooner.

There hasn't been any "missed learning" due to the pandemic. Quite the contrary, kids have learned useful life lessons and gained valuable experience - memories of living through a pandemic which will be key in preventing/minimising the effects of the next. And alas, no changes will come to the education system anyway, thanks to the Tories (though Labour are no better on this front)
Thanks for sharing your perspective. I've seen thoughts on both sides of the fence tbh and it's interesting what you say about learning life lessons and future changes to the edu system. I wonder whether you have any suggestions in terms of what might support those students who have faced challenges in home learning (for reference, lots of kids told us recently they don't have access to what they need to succeed in home learning)? Also just out of interest, what year are you studying in?

(Original post by V℮rsions)
Lets be realistic here - wellbeing support isn't going to make up for lost time.
Fair point! I think the article (linked in the OP) was talking more about increasing wellbeing funding to give students the best chances of succeeding in catching up if they're behind. The article is where the five options are from, but totally agree it sounds a bit odd as an approach on its own!
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happydayys
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So yeah i just wanted to agree that there have been way more opportunities for kids to learn useful life skills this year than others cos they’re at home.

If they’re in exam years, i would say having optional drop in classes/tutoring would be the best. There’s no point making kids who don’t care about their eduction spend longer in school and it would probably just make it harder for those who do care to get work done.

I think optional is best because then everyone can assess how much they feel they need/care about catching up so probably the most time effective.

Think its pointless to force people to spend longer in education to “catch up” for missed learning, that tbh may not have happened anyway.

Also just wanted to say, i reckon for school leavers etc.. who now have messed up GCSEs and A levels, theres going to need to be more support for them in terms of finding jobs/talking to employers/giving them other ways of getting qualifications and showing transferable skills. That would be much more useful than any other options suggested above i reckon for kids who struggle with school/dont want to go down an academic route.
Last edited by happydayys; 1 week ago
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billybob234
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summer school and extended days is just pain
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ScoutLeopard
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Out of all of these, I really hope that repeating the school year is the last option. I am year 12 and it would be really stressful to repeat the year and I wouldn't want to sit through classes on topics that I've already studied. Also, wouldn't it really mess with years 13, 6 and nursery? Year 13 and 6 as they've been preparing for moving onto the 'next stage' - especially year 13s who have spent so long on their personal statements, interviews, researching unis and have already been starting to get offers. Would they go on to uni and just leave an empty year 13? I think it would affect nursey as if everyone repeats the year, but the year that was supposed to start nursery joined then you would be asking the teachers to look after double the amount students which wouldn't be good for the teachers mental health and they don't get paid enough for that.

This is my opinion from a stressed out year 12 who had their GCSEs cancelled and who knows what's going to happen to my years A-Levels/IB/Btec exams.
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Yewfelle
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(Original post by BlinkyBill)
Thanks for sharing your perspective. I've seen thoughts on both sides of the fence tbh and it's interesting what you say about learning life lessons and future changes to the edu system. I wonder whether you have any suggestions in terms of what might support those students who have faced challenges in home learning (for reference, lots of kids told us recently they don't have access to what they need to succeed in home learning)? Also just out of interest, what year are you studying in?


Fair point! I think the article (linked in the OP) was talking more about increasing wellbeing funding to give students the best chances of succeeding in catching up if they're behind. The article is where the five options are from, but totally agree it sounds a bit odd as an approach on its own!
Supporting kids who have faced challenges in home learning is a matter of welfare and providing basics to people in need. Internet access is a basic human right and it should be free. Unlimited mobile data to allow kids to better access materials is also a good idea, but generally providing access to electronics such as laptops is crucial, for general networking and information access as well as for educational purposes. A lot of the issues which come with kids struggling with home learning are linked with poor living conditions - improve those living conditions. The government has plenty of resources to do so.

As for what year I'm studying in, I'm doing a repeat year 13. I sat an A level and an AS last year with the cancellations, and this year I'm doing another 2.
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Buddingdentist08
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#10
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In my opinion I think students who are really far behind need one to one tutoring and those who aren't as far behind need extra teaching time. If they do these through summer schools they should not be compulsory and only last for a couple of hours per day so children still have time to do other things. Perhaps schools should do some form of testing and assessment to see who needs what support and which students are on track.
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