A level courses to university courses

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shalley112323
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hii for a level I want to do biology, mathematics, and media but i don't know what course in university really suits those subjects? I want to be something that relates to biology and maths in the future but I really like media with passion and it is easy for me. any tips? thanks in advance
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Joseph_D1
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You could study biology at university. All STEM subjects have a good chunk of mathematics within them anyways.
For media I'm not 100% sure. I guess I'd keep it as a hobby, like writing articles online and stuff
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artful_lounger
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I would note that most bioscience degrees require A-level Chemistry, and if they don't you will usually study that material in the first year of your degree course. So a lack of A-level Chemistry might restrict your options somewhat. However most bioscience degrees are available to students who did the "wrong" A-levels via a foundation year still, so that option is still open to you.

Maths degrees are very unlike the kind of maths you cover in A-level and GCSE, and so liking and doing well in that kind of maths won't necessarily imply that you will do well or enjoy the kind of maths in a maths degree. Also not having A-level Further Maths may slightly limit the range of options available to you for maths degrees, but more importantly might not prepare you all that well for doing well in such a degree were you successful. However degrees in STEM fields other than maths generally as above tend to have at least some mathematical content and that is more in the vein of A-level Maths.

As for media, it depends somewhat on what aspects of it you enjoy. If it's analysing media then you won't really find that in a STEM degree course, as that kind of close analysis will usually be present in more of a text based subject like English literature, classics, media, film studies, etc. If it's the media production then that is a different area entirely, which would usually be the basis of degrees in media/film/TV production rather than media/film studies. If your goal is ultimately to work in e.g. film/TV production, a production focused degree might be preferable (or even necessary), particularly e.g. CILECT partner university's degrees as they specifically are members of that group because they include within the degree a range of skills considered essential in that field.

If you're interested in the intersection of science and everyday life and culture, and how people encounter and interpret science (rather than doing science yourself), you might consider a degree in science and technology studies/history and philosophy of science or perhaps anthropology (at some unis) or human sciences (a very uncommon course). Something in that vein of anthropology or STS might be of interest academically, and there is often opportunity (usually extra-curricularly but sometimes within the curriculum as well such as at UCL) to engage in media production enterprises in connection with that academic material.

UCL might be worth particularly noting here as it offers degrees in all these latter areas (STS/HPS, anthropology, and human sciences), and of particular note their anthropology course covers not only social anthropology and material culture, but also biological anthropology and they have a large range of media production modules offered in the anthropology department in e.g. ethnographic film production. However as above I imagine you would have some opportunity (even if it was as an extracurricular activity during your degree studies) to engage in media production on those kinds of degrees.
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shalley112323
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I would note that most bioscience degrees require A-level Chemistry, and if they don't you will usually study that material in the first year of your degree course. So a lack of A-level Chemistry might restrict your options somewhat. However most bioscience degrees are available to students who did the "wrong" A-levels via a foundation year still, so that option is still open to you.

Maths degrees are very unlike the kind of maths you cover in A-level and GCSE, and so liking and doing well in that kind of maths won't necessarily imply that you will do well or enjoy the kind of maths in a maths degree. Also not having A-level Further Maths may slightly limit the range of options available to you for maths degrees, but more importantly might not prepare you all that well for doing well in such a degree were you successful. However degrees in STEM fields other than maths generally as above tend to have at least some mathematical content and that is more in the vein of A-level Maths.

As for media, it depends somewhat on what aspects of it you enjoy. If it's analysing media then you won't really find that in a STEM degree course, as that kind of close analysis will usually be present in more of a text based subject like English literature, classics, media, film studies, etc. If it's the media production then that is a different area entirely, which would usually be the basis of degrees in media/film/TV production rather than media/film studies. If your goal is ultimately to work in e.g. film/TV production, a production focused degree might be preferable (or even necessary), particularly e.g. CILECT partner university's degrees as they specifically are members of that group because they include within the degree a range of skills considered essential in that field.

If you're interested in the intersection of science and everyday life and culture, and how people encounter and interpret science (rather than doing science yourself), you might consider a degree in science and technology studies/history and philosophy of science or perhaps anthropology (at some unis) or human sciences (a very uncommon course). Something in that vein of anthropology or STS might be of interest academically, and there is often opportunity (usually extra-curricularly but sometimes within the curriculum as well such as at UCL) to engage in media production enterprises in connection with that academic material.

UCL might be worth particularly noting here as it offers degrees in all these latter areas (STS/HPS, anthropology, and human sciences), and of particular note their anthropology course covers not only social anthropology and material culture, but also biological anthropology and they have a large range of media production modules offered in the anthropology department in e.g. ethnographic film production. However as above I imagine you would have some opportunity (even if it was as an extracurricular activity during your degree studies) to engage in media production on those kinds of degrees.
do you know any type of degree that only needs biology and mathematics? because if I was to take chemistry for a level I really wouldn't think I would do well in it as I don't really enjoy it and my motivation tends to be low with subjects I don't enjoy. Besides that thanks!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by shalley112323)
do you know any type of degree that only needs biology and mathematics? because if I was to take chemistry for a level I really wouldn't think I would do well in it as I don't really enjoy it and my motivation tends to be low with subjects I don't enjoy. Besides that thanks!
Some bioscience degrees that are mainly focused on e.g. ecology and conservation. Also human sciences or (biologicalevolutionary) anthropology degrees as suggested above (usually these aren't required but are considered helpful preparation for the course, although I think it is required for UCL human sciences). It would also be a good background for a psychology degree.
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shalley112323
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Some bioscience degrees that are mainly focused on e.g. ecology and conservation. Also human sciences or (biologicalevolutionary) anthropology degrees as suggested above (usually these aren't required but are considered helpful preparation for the course, although I think it is required for UCL human sciences). It would also be a good background for a psychology degree.
hi, i did some research and I found a course that would really suit me which is biostatistics. The problem is that I think it is for postgraduates so do you have a similar course to that one that is for undergraduates. I did some research on this course and I really love it!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by shalley112323)
hi, i did some research and I found a course that would really suit me which is biostatistics. The problem is that I think it is for postgraduates so do you have a similar course to that one that is for undergraduates. I did some research on this course and I really love it!
To go on to a course in biostatistics you would probably be generally expected to have a first degree in mathematics, statistics, computer science, or something related to those areas (other physical sciences or engineering fields, or perhaps a very mathematical economics course). I expect relatively few going into biostatistics/bioinformatics (the two areas overlap considerably) would have biosciences as their initial background. For those kinds of degrees I would strong recommend taking A-level Further Maths if it's available to you.

My prior remarks about the difference in the style of maths between maths degrees and A-level Maths applies. A degree which focused more on statistics would still include some of this more abstract maths (linear algebra, although they might teach it more in a methods-y way perhaps, and probably some real analysis), although you might avoid other areas (e.g. group theory and algebra).

UCL has a degree purely in statistics, as well as joint honours courses in mathematics and statistics (which would probably be a better background than the statistics course as you do some real analysis which I expect would be necessary for graduate studies in biostatistics), among other subject areas. Warwick has it's MORSE programme (where you would also study economics, for better or for worse, and OR which might be relevant perhaps), as well as a mathematics and statistics joint honours course.

Both also offer degrees in data science (essentially the intersection of statistics and computer science, perhaps with more or less maths as well) which might be a good background for more computational work in biostatistics. Otherwise generally degrees in mathematics from strong maths departments will likely give you a good range of statistics options (some of which might be in biostatistics). CS degrees or otherwise might also be applicable.

Note in all these cases though there is probably not going to be much bioscience content in your undergraduate course. Also even on a biostatistics masters, I expect the emphasis is on statistics, with biosciences as the application, rather than on fundamental biology, with some statistics being used in the process. If you are mainly interested in maths though then that shouldn't be an issue.
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