Johnhammhamod12
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Anyone doing classics a level - what’s it like - how hard is it for somebody who’s not studied history or classics at gcse
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Primrose1267
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Generally, the history you’ll cover in most cases won’t ever be the same as gcse. So content wise you’ll be fine, however the skills and questions depending on the exam board may be harder to learn considering you didn’t do history at a level. Although if your good at English/essay writing you should have no problems!
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Johnhammhamod12
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(Original post by Primrose1267)
Generally, the history you’ll cover in most cases won’t ever be the same as gcse. So content wise you’ll be fine, however the skills and questions depending on the exam board may be harder to learn considering you didn’t do history at a level. Although if your good at English/essay writing you should have no problems!
Oh okay thanks ? How hard would you say it is to get a good grade ??
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Primrose1267
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(Original post by Johnhammhamod12)
Oh okay thanks ? How hard would you say it is to get a good grade ??
In my experience, I’d say history isn’t commonly known for being an extremely challenging subject unlike stem subjects such as maths or chemistry. But it’s quite well respected and isn’t too difficult. However, all a levels are hard and require hard work and it is important you are strong in essay writing.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Johnhammhamod12)
Oh okay thanks ? How hard would you say it is to get a good grade ??
What degree are you thinking of? It's not respected that much ...
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Primrose1267
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(Original post by Muttley79)
What degree are you thinking of? It's not respected that much ...
Well I think that depends massively on the degree, history is quite respected in my opinion.
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Primrose1267
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(Original post by Muttley79)
What degree are you thinking of? It's not respected that much ...
And classics is what Boris Johnson took, he’s mot doing to bad for himself.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Primrose1267)
And classics is what Boris Johnson took, he’s mot doing to bad for himself.
Classics in NOT the same as Class Civ btw
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Primrose1267
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Classics in NOT the same as Class Civ btw
I mean it’s one of the most recommended subjects from the most prestigious and elite unis
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Primrose1267)
I mean it’s one of the most recommended subjects from the most prestigious and elite unis
That A level is not though ... when I taught at a comp it was one that our weaker students chose ...
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Johnhammhamod12
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Not sure yet , just deciding wether I want to do classic civilisation as my third a level
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Primrose1267
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(Original post by Muttley79)
That A level is not though ... when I taught at a comp it was one that our weaker students chose ...
Read it anywhere, it’s an extremely respected a level not far off in terms of stem subjects.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Primrose1267)
Read it anywhere, it’s an extremely respected a level not far off in terms of stem subjects.
You jest - as I said only weaker students took it - Latin and Greek A levels are fine - Class Civ is not.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Muttley79)
That A level is not though ... when I taught at a comp it was one that our weaker students chose ...
That speaks more to your school than the A-level. Just because someone taking classical civ and maths might be weaker in maths does not make classical civ a "bad" subject, it just indicates they are likely to be stronger in humanities or other essay based subjects.

Classical civilisation is often preferred for students applying to classics courses if they do not have the languages, and for most students not going to a fancy private school it is the only option they have to engage in that subject matter. It's a very common subject option for those applying to e.g. the 4 year classics course at Cambridge or Classics course II at Oxford. So your information is not factually correct . Feel free to educate by looking through FOIA requests into subjects taken by applicants to those and similar classics or similar courses. There is an abundance of data which directly disproves your remarks
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Muttley79
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
That
It was the view of the Head of Sixth who actually taught Class Civ so please edit your post!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Johnhammhamod12)
Anyone doing classics a level - what’s it like - how hard is it for somebody who’s not studied history or classics at gcse
As mentioned previously, the style and content of the course will be very diffrerent from GCSE History. You will probably find it has more in common with GCSE English Lit for the literary aspects, then GCSE History in the historical aspects. Ancient history seems in general to be approached from a somewhat different way to "modern" history, as the types of sources used are usually quite different and are not so amenable to the same kind of source evaluation and analysis as modern history (i.e. medieval and onwards). They also can be quite literary in character too.

I doubt they will expect any specific prior knowledge though and likely will teach everything from scratch. It might be helpful to have read some of the texts beforehand, so check with the teacher what will be studied; I believe usually students are examined only on portions of some texts (e.g. the epic texts), but knowledge of the whole text would help you contextualise those sections much better. So depending on what you are covering, reading a translation of the Odyssey/Iliad/Aeneid over the summer before might be helpful, so you have a general idea of the plot (also they're quite long so that gives you plenty of time to work through them without worrying about your other classes!). On the Greek side reading some Hesiod might also provide some cultural background to their world view and nature and role of the gods (e.g. in Theogony and/or Works and Days). Most Greek texts (I expect Roman ones too) have translations available free on Perseus if you wanted to do a bit of reading beforehand
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Muttley79)
It was the view of the Head of Sixth who actually taught Class Civ so please edit your post!
So we've gone from it being your own anecdotal knowledge to someone else's anecdotal knowledge, which is even less of a reliable source? Sorry, I'll stick with the actual data published by universities with some of the leading classics departments in the world over what someone who may or may not exist may or may not have said about students at a single school in the UK, in evaluating whether a subject is well regarded or not.

If you wish to believe in what is at best data with an extreme sample bias, and at worst may not even be a realistic representation of the state of things at all, then by all means do so. As with many of your remarks on here though, it is wrong s to misrepresent this as some kind of objective fact to young students who may not know better than to take such comments with several large pinches of salt.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
So
I'm sure my ex-colleague will be delighted you regard her as fictional - we'll have a good laugh about that

Experienced and good teachers can get high grades from this course quite easily - so students far exceed ALIS targets. She was brilliant at topic spotting too ... few selective schools choose to offer it - prefering to offer Latin - don't you think that is significant?
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PandaPancake0
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I'd recommend it. It is a interdisciplinary subject and is respected by unis. It appears on every unis 'accepted' A levels now AND pre reform. It seems very interesting and seems to be quite well suited for someone with an aspiration to do a more humanities based degree. Although it is not a facilitating subject, and is not perhaps as rigorous as subjects like History or Greek for example, I'd wager it is around the same level as economics or religious studies. Not facilitating but well respected. Of course that is a subjective opinion and you can't really compare subjects 'respectability' as it's quite an arbitrary metric it seems like a good choice if you intend to pursue something humanities based at uni.
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Sprintline
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(Original post by Muttley79)
I'm sure my ex-colleague will be delighted you regard her as fictional - we'll have a good laugh about that

Experienced and good teachers can get high grades from this course quite easily - so students far exceed ALIS targets. She was brilliant at topic spotting too ... few selective schools choose to offer it - prefering to offer Latin - don't you think that is significant?
Your argument seems very short and based on what other people have told you compared to the artful_lounger. The definition between weak and soft subjects have declined with the abandoning of 'Facilitating Subjects' and now subjects like Classics, Economics and Philosophy are seen as impressive.
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