Ce765
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Any help please
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Ferrets
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In Google scholar
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Did you receive the help you needed?
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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As far as I know there are NO "NHS journal articles" [the esteemed journals for general medicine in the UK are the BMJ and The Lancet. In the US, you have JAMA, NEJM, etc.

However, there are hundreds of different medical journals for the various specialties in medicine throughout the world. One way of accessing full-text papers in these journals FOC is as stated above by Ferrets.

Another good way is to use the National Library of Medicine site [select the PMC database from the dropdown top left]:-
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/

Be safe!
M
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Ce765
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(Original post by Ferrets)
In Google scholar
I could fin scientific articles but not NHS ones
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Ce765)
Any help please
It's something I would access using my University Library Log-In. Once I have logged in, I can access all manner of journals.

What is the specific name of the journal you have in mind?
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nexttime
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What on earth is an "NHS journal"?
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(Original post by Ce765)
I could fin scientific articles but not NHS ones
Try and filter you search as much as possible.
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Ce765
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It's something I would access using my University Library Log-In. Once I have logged in, I can access all manner of journals.

What is the specific name of the journal you have in mind?
I still couldn't find something related to what i am looking for. It is aspirin/salicylate overdose/toxicity in infants.
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(Original post by Ce765)
I still couldn't find something related to what i am looking for. It is aspirin/salicylate overdose/toxicity in infants.
Ok so, there is no such thing as an 'NHS journal'. There are lots of other medical journals, though.

Aspirin toxicity in infants has been known for a very, very long time. Are you after historic journals then? A recent review article summarising the topic? An interesting case study? What are you looking for?
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Ce765
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Ok so, there is no such thing as an 'NHS journal'. There are lots of other medical journals, though.

Aspirin toxicity in infants has been known for a very, very long time. Are you after historic journals then? A recent review article summarising the topic? An interesting case study? What are you looking for?
I'm looking for a review article summarising the topic like the symptoms of it and how the overdose gets treated.
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by Ce765)
I'm looking for a review article summarising the topic like the symptoms of it and how the overdose gets treated.
Hi there Junior Member,

I think nexttime's tough policy helps by making students do the hard work, which is probs more beneficial in the long-term than my tactic of part spoon-feeding, and coaxing millenials to use their brains [which they have been trained from babyhood to allow to decay - sorry :mad:] - I am going to try and push you off the cliff here ["how nasty this guy is!" goes the student!] actually not literally, only metaphorically, with a quick Endnote search and copying of the abstracts therein with the refs list, to get you into 2nd gear [it is now your job to accelerate and go into overdrive [nice & easy - slowly!][have you done your driving test yet? - if you need help I am an MIAM, too - just shout out] Do the searches I recommended with a variety of [separate] keywords to find more + read the full-text articles of the below [agreed these are NOT specific for infants, but you will get an idea esp from the experiment on chicks [no 4] and the one published in the journal Paediatrics [no 2]].

Best of luck!

Salicylate poisoning remains a major clinical hazard, usually resulting from accidental ingestions in preschool children, suicidal overdoses in adults and teenagers, and therapeutically acquired intoxication in all ages. Alkalemia or acidemia, alkaluria or aciduria, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and water and electrolyte imbalances may occur; nausea, vomiting, tinnitus, hyperpnea, hyperpyrexia, disorientation, coma, and/or convulsions are common. With chronic, therapeutically induced salicylism, these symptoms may be mistaken for symptoms resulting from the illness for which the salicylates were administered. For acute ingestions, the magnitude of the poisoning is clearly dose related. Blood level determinations are good prognostic indicators for acute ingestions but are of limited value in chronic, therapeutically induced salicylism. Fluid and electrolyte management is the mainstay of therapy. Diuresis, hemodialysis, and hemoperfusion are effective, but the latter two rarely are necessary1

The principal pathophysiologic effect of toxic doses of salicylates are characterized by (1) stimulation of the respiratory center of the brain, leading to hyperpnea and respiratory alkalosis; (2) uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to increased oxygen utilization and glucose demand, increased oxygen utilization and glucose demand, increased glyconeogenesis, and increased heat production; (3) inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes, leading to decreased glucose availability and increased organic acids; (4) alterations in lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism, enhancing metabolic acidosis; and (5) increased fluid and electrolyte losses, leading to dehydration, sodium depletion, potassium depletion, and loss of buffer capacity. The principal toxic manifestations of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis, altered glucose availability and depletion, fluid and electrolyte losses, and hypermetabolism result in serious morbidity and are potentially fatal. Therapy of salicylate intoxication should be aimed principally at replacement of fluid electrolytes, correction of acidemia, administration of glucose, and prevention of further salicylate absorption and enhancement of salicylate elimination.2

Among 2,391 recipients of plain aspirin tablets, 121 (5.1%) were reported to have adverse reactions. Minor gastrointestinal disturbances, particularly heartburn and nausea, were most common (2.1%). Central nervous system effects were second (1.2%). Among these, tinnitus was reported most often (0.8%); deafness occurred in eight patients (0.3%). Gastrointestinal bleeding, the third major category of adverse reactions, occurred in 1.0% of recipients; it was not considered serious in any of the patients with reactions judged "definitely" or "probably" related to aspirin. The frequency of all adverse reactions increased as the unit dose, daily dose and total dose became larger. Deafness occurred only at high doses. Reactions were more common in females.3

The toxicity of dietary aspirin on growth rate and lipid metabolism was investigated under linoleic acid (LA; 18: 2n-6) deficient conditions. One-week-old chicks were given diets containing 0 or 2% LA with or without 0.4% aspirin, until 4 weeks of age. Growth was severely depressed by dietary aspirin when chicks were given the LA-free diet. The liver was enlarged by both the aspirin and LA deficiency. The aspirin treatment induced a significant increase of 18:0 and arachidonic acid (20: 4n-6) and a decrease of 18: 1n-9 in the liver. In chicks fed LA-free diets, the ratio of 20:3n-9/20: 4n-6, which was used as an indicator of LA deficiency, was suppressed by aspirin treatment. In conclusion, the present results suggest that aspirin toxicity is altered by dietary LA concentrations.4



1. Temple AR. Acute and chronic effects of aspirin toxicity and their treatment. Arch Intern Med. Feb 23 1981;141(3 Spec No):364-369.
2. Temple AR. Pathophysiology of aspirin overdosage toxicity, with implications for management. Pediatrics. Nov 1978;62(5 Pt 2 Suppl):873-876.
3. Miller RR, Jick H. Acute toxicity of aspirin in hospitalized medical patients. Am J Med Sci. Nov-Dec 1977;274(3):271-279.
4. Murai A, Furuse M, Okumura J. Aspirin toxicity in chicks given diets deficient in linoleic acid. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. Aug 1994;48(4):1047-1051.



If still stuck PM me - happy to help out!

M
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Ce765
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi there Junior Member,

I think nexttime's tough policy helps by making students do the hard work, which is probs more beneficial in the long-term than my tactic of part spoon-feeding, and coaxing millenials to use their brains [which they have been trained from babyhood to allow to decay - sorry :mad:] - I am going to try and push you off the cliff here ["how nasty this guy is!" goes the student!] actually not literally, only metaphorically, with a quick Endnote search and copying of the abstracts therein with the refs list, to get you into 2nd gear [it is now your job to accelerate and go into overdrive [nice & easy - slowly!][have you done your driving test yet? - if you need help I am an MIAM, too - just shout out] Do the searches I recommended with a variety of [separate] keywords to find more + read the full-text articles of the below [agreed these are NOT specific for infants, but you will get an idea esp from the experiment on chicks [no 4] and the one published in the journal Paediatrics [no 2]].

Best of luck!

Salicylate poisoning remains a major clinical hazard, usually resulting from accidental ingestions in preschool children, suicidal overdoses in adults and teenagers, and therapeutically acquired intoxication in all ages. Alkalemia or acidemia, alkaluria or aciduria, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and water and electrolyte imbalances may occur; nausea, vomiting, tinnitus, hyperpnea, hyperpyrexia, disorientation, coma, and/or convulsions are common. With chronic, therapeutically induced salicylism, these symptoms may be mistaken for symptoms resulting from the illness for which the salicylates were administered. For acute ingestions, the magnitude of the poisoning is clearly dose related. Blood level determinations are good prognostic indicators for acute ingestions but are of limited value in chronic, therapeutically induced salicylism. Fluid and electrolyte management is the mainstay of therapy. Diuresis, hemodialysis, and hemoperfusion are effective, but the latter two rarely are necessary1

The principal pathophysiologic effect of toxic doses of salicylates are characterized by (1) stimulation of the respiratory center of the brain, leading to hyperpnea and respiratory alkalosis; (2) uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to increased oxygen utilization and glucose demand, increased oxygen utilization and glucose demand, increased glyconeogenesis, and increased heat production; (3) inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes, leading to decreased glucose availability and increased organic acids; (4) alterations in lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism, enhancing metabolic acidosis; and (5) increased fluid and electrolyte losses, leading to dehydration, sodium depletion, potassium depletion, and loss of buffer capacity. The principal toxic manifestations of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis, altered glucose availability and depletion, fluid and electrolyte losses, and hypermetabolism result in serious morbidity and are potentially fatal. Therapy of salicylate intoxication should be aimed principally at replacement of fluid electrolytes, correction of acidemia, administration of glucose, and prevention of further salicylate absorption and enhancement of salicylate elimination.2

Among 2,391 recipients of plain aspirin tablets, 121 (5.1%) were reported to have adverse reactions. Minor gastrointestinal disturbances, particularly heartburn and nausea, were most common (2.1%). Central nervous system effects were second (1.2%). Among these, tinnitus was reported most often (0.8%); deafness occurred in eight patients (0.3%). Gastrointestinal bleeding, the third major category of adverse reactions, occurred in 1.0% of recipients; it was not considered serious in any of the patients with reactions judged "definitely" or "probably" related to aspirin. The frequency of all adverse reactions increased as the unit dose, daily dose and total dose became larger. Deafness occurred only at high doses. Reactions were more common in females.3

The toxicity of dietary aspirin on growth rate and lipid metabolism was investigated under linoleic acid (LA; 18: 2n-6) deficient conditions. One-week-old chicks were given diets containing 0 or 2% LA with or without 0.4% aspirin, until 4 weeks of age. Growth was severely depressed by dietary aspirin when chicks were given the LA-free diet. The liver was enlarged by both the aspirin and LA deficiency. The aspirin treatment induced a significant increase of 18:0 and arachidonic acid (20: 4n-6) and a decrease of 18: 1n-9 in the liver. In chicks fed LA-free diets, the ratio of 20:3n-9/20: 4n-6, which was used as an indicator of LA deficiency, was suppressed by aspirin treatment. In conclusion, the present results suggest that aspirin toxicity is altered by dietary LA concentrations.4



1. Temple AR. Acute and chronic effects of aspirin toxicity and their treatment. Arch Intern Med. Feb 23 1981;141(3 Spec No):364-369.
2. Temple AR. Pathophysiology of aspirin overdosage toxicity, with implications for management. Pediatrics. Nov 1978;62(5 Pt 2 Suppl):873-876.
3. Miller RR, Jick H. Acute toxicity of aspirin in hospitalized medical patients. Am J Med Sci. Nov-Dec 1977;274(3):271-279.
4. Murai A, Furuse M, Okumura J. Aspirin toxicity in chicks given diets deficient in linoleic acid. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. Aug 1994;48(4):1047-1051.



If still stuck PM me - happy to help out!

M
Thank you so much! I found the pediatrics article on google scholar but for some reason it requested purchasing it to be able to access it. Can u let me know if i can accesse it without purchasing it please?
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Ce765
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi there Junior Member,

I think nexttime's tough policy helps by making students do the hard work, which is probs more beneficial in the long-term than my tactic of part spoon-feeding, and coaxing millenials to use their brains [which they have been trained from babyhood to allow to decay - sorry :mad:] - I am going to try and push you off the cliff here ["how nasty this guy is!" goes the student!] actually not literally, only metaphorically, with a quick Endnote search and copying of the abstracts therein with the refs list, to get you into 2nd gear [it is now your job to accelerate and go into overdrive [nice & easy - slowly!][have you done your driving test yet? - if you need help I am an MIAM, too - just shout out] Do the searches I recommended with a variety of [separate] keywords to find more + read the full-text articles of the below [agreed these are NOT specific for infants, but you will get an idea esp from the experiment on chicks [no 4] and the one published in the journal Paediatrics [no 2]].

Best of luck!

Salicylate poisoning remains a major clinical hazard, usually resulting from accidental ingestions in preschool children, suicidal overdoses in adults and teenagers, and therapeutically acquired intoxication in all ages. Alkalemia or acidemia, alkaluria or aciduria, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and water and electrolyte imbalances may occur; nausea, vomiting, tinnitus, hyperpnea, hyperpyrexia, disorientation, coma, and/or convulsions are common. With chronic, therapeutically induced salicylism, these symptoms may be mistaken for symptoms resulting from the illness for which the salicylates were administered. For acute ingestions, the magnitude of the poisoning is clearly dose related. Blood level determinations are good prognostic indicators for acute ingestions but are of limited value in chronic, therapeutically induced salicylism. Fluid and electrolyte management is the mainstay of therapy. Diuresis, hemodialysis, and hemoperfusion are effective, but the latter two rarely are necessary1

The principal pathophysiologic effect of toxic doses of salicylates are characterized by (1) stimulation of the respiratory center of the brain, leading to hyperpnea and respiratory alkalosis; (2) uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to increased oxygen utilization and glucose demand, increased oxygen utilization and glucose demand, increased glyconeogenesis, and increased heat production; (3) inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes, leading to decreased glucose availability and increased organic acids; (4) alterations in lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism, enhancing metabolic acidosis; and (5) increased fluid and electrolyte losses, leading to dehydration, sodium depletion, potassium depletion, and loss of buffer capacity. The principal toxic manifestations of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis, altered glucose availability and depletion, fluid and electrolyte losses, and hypermetabolism result in serious morbidity and are potentially fatal. Therapy of salicylate intoxication should be aimed principally at replacement of fluid electrolytes, correction of acidemia, administration of glucose, and prevention of further salicylate absorption and enhancement of salicylate elimination.2

Among 2,391 recipients of plain aspirin tablets, 121 (5.1%) were reported to have adverse reactions. Minor gastrointestinal disturbances, particularly heartburn and nausea, were most common (2.1%). Central nervous system effects were second (1.2%). Among these, tinnitus was reported most often (0.8%); deafness occurred in eight patients (0.3%). Gastrointestinal bleeding, the third major category of adverse reactions, occurred in 1.0% of recipients; it was not considered serious in any of the patients with reactions judged "definitely" or "probably" related to aspirin. The frequency of all adverse reactions increased as the unit dose, daily dose and total dose became larger. Deafness occurred only at high doses. Reactions were more common in females.3

The toxicity of dietary aspirin on growth rate and lipid metabolism was investigated under linoleic acid (LA; 18: 2n-6) deficient conditions. One-week-old chicks were given diets containing 0 or 2% LA with or without 0.4% aspirin, until 4 weeks of age. Growth was severely depressed by dietary aspirin when chicks were given the LA-free diet. The liver was enlarged by both the aspirin and LA deficiency. The aspirin treatment induced a significant increase of 18:0 and arachidonic acid (20: 4n-6) and a decrease of 18: 1n-9 in the liver. In chicks fed LA-free diets, the ratio of 20:3n-9/20: 4n-6, which was used as an indicator of LA deficiency, was suppressed by aspirin treatment. In conclusion, the present results suggest that aspirin toxicity is altered by dietary LA concentrations.4



1. Temple AR. Acute and chronic effects of aspirin toxicity and their treatment. Arch Intern Med. Feb 23 1981;141(3 Spec No):364-369.
2. Temple AR. Pathophysiology of aspirin overdosage toxicity, with implications for management. Pediatrics. Nov 1978;62(5 Pt 2 Suppl):873-876.
3. Miller RR, Jick H. Acute toxicity of aspirin in hospitalized medical patients. Am J Med Sci. Nov-Dec 1977;274(3):271-279.
4. Murai A, Furuse M, Okumura J. Aspirin toxicity in chicks given diets deficient in linoleic acid. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. Aug 1994;48(4):1047-1051.



If still stuck PM me - happy to help out!

M
Thank you so much! I found the pediatrics article on google scholar but for some reason it requested purchasing it to be able to access it. Can u let me know if i can accesse it without purchasing it please?
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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Good morning young man - looks like you were burning the Cinderella oil last night - take it easy man - working to 2 a.m. shows some motivation, but one does need some rest, too! [I suppose you will now get up at midday like a uni student lol!
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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I assume you are at school or uni - ask your library staff for your personal ID for Shibboleth or OpenAthens, then login with that here:-
https://pediatrics.aappublications.o...tent/62/5s/873

You should then get free full-text articles for most journals.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Ce765)
Thank you so much! I found the pediatrics article on google scholar but for some reason it requested purchasing it to be able to access it.
That is what journals do - they take scientific articles, and make people pay for them. They don't actually add anything - they don't pay for the research, or door the peer review. They take the article for free, then make others pay for it.

There are sites where you can get around paywalls yes - access to Sci for free. They are also vastly easier to use than actual journal sites - more of a Hub than individually divided sites each with their own access. I am, of course, not allowed to link such a site to you on here though.
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Ce765
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
I assume you are at school or uni - ask your library staff for your personal ID for Shibboleth or OpenAthens, then login with that here:-
https://pediatrics.aappublications.o...tent/62/5s/873

You should then get free full-text articles for most journals.
Okay i'll ask them, thank you so much!
Could you please messge me? For some reason i can't start the chat
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Ce765
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(Original post by nexttime)
That is what journals do - they take scientific articles, and make people pay for them. They don't actually add anything - they don't pay for the research, or door the peer review. They take the article for free, then make others pay for it.

There are sites where you can get around paywalls yes - access to Sci for free. They are also vastly easier to use than actual journal sites - more of a Hub than individually divided sites each with their own access. I am, of course, not allowed to link such a site to you on here though.
Okay no worries. Thank you for your help!
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nexttime
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Okay no worries. Thank you for your help!
No problem, and maybe you will also catch the Hint I have given you, who knows.
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