Qxi.xli
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
im considering a physics degree. anyone have any info, tips/advice for me please? xxx tysmmm xxx
2
reply
JuliusDS92
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
(Original post by Qxi.xli)
im considering a physics degree. anyone have any info, tips/advice for me please? xxx tysmmm xxx
Hey there! I completed a physics degree in 2017 (don't ask me my age ). There's a lot I could say about it, so why don't you help me out and give me some questions to answer
0
reply
UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 months ago
#3
(Original post by Qxi.xli)
im considering a physics degree. anyone have any info, tips/advice for me please? xxx tysmmm xxx
Hello Qxi.xli!

One thing you'll find, even by just looking into different courses and unis, is that physics is a very broad subject. There are lots of branches that you could delve into, which is one of the reasons I really enjoy studying it! I myself do theoretical physics, so the credits of labwork I would've done are instead replaced by more maths-based modules, and I love to see how maths is applicable in a range of situations. This is also the reason why general physics is such a good choice of degree - it gives you the opportunity to explore a range of topics, and gives you the fundamental understanding, which you could then use to hone in on more specific topics (whether it be transferring to something more specific during your course or afterwards, like your masters or post-grad and so on).

Of course, you wouldn't consider any degree 'good' if you didn't enjoy the subject itself. This is one of my main tips: it might be worth reading around the subject a little bit, whether it be books or documentaries or youtube videos, and seeing if it intrigues you. University physics is very different to A-Level/prior physics in more ways than just difficulty. It's less formulaic (there's no given mark scheme to follow) and much more driven by enthusiasm. If you don't enjoy it you'll get burnt out pretty quick!

There's still so much I could say but I don't want to flood you with info and just want to emphasise that point, honestly! If you have any further questions feel free to message

-Faye, Theoretical Physics
1
reply
Qxi.xli
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences)
Hello Qxi.xli!

One thing you'll find, even by just looking into different courses and unis, is that physics is a very broad subject. There are lots of branches that you could delve into, which is one of the reasons I really enjoy studying it! I myself do theoretical physics, so the credits of labwork I would've done are instead replaced by more maths-based modules, and I love to see how maths is applicable in a range of situations. This is also the reason why general physics is such a good choice of degree - it gives you the opportunity to explore a range of topics, and gives you the fundamental understanding, which you could then use to hone in on more specific topics (whether it be transferring to something more specific during your course or afterwards, like your masters or post-grad and so on).

Of course, you wouldn't consider any degree 'good' if you didn't enjoy the subject itself. This is one of my main tips: it might be worth reading around the subject a little bit, whether it be books or documentaries or youtube videos, and seeing if it intrigues you. University physics is very different to A-Level/prior physics in more ways than just difficulty. It's less formulaic (there's no given mark scheme to follow) and much more driven by enthusiasm. If you don't enjoy it you'll get burnt out pretty quick!

There's still so much I could say but I don't want to flood you with info and just want to emphasise that point, honestly! If you have any further questions feel free to message

-Faye, Theoretical Physics
Thank you!
0
reply
HoldThisL
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
pi=3
0
reply
Sinnoh
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by HoldThisL)
pi=3
That's engineering. The physics meme is "derivatives are fractions".
0
reply
HoldThisL
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Sinnoh)
That's engineering. The physics meme is "derivatives are fractions".
oh yeah right

/i study sOcial science
0
reply
theOldBean
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Caveat: This answer talks about theoretical physics. My degree is in maths, and I don't know much about experimental physics at undergrad level.)

Undergrad physics is much more mathematical than A-level physics, and you need techniques from A-level maths to do it. Particularly important are vectors and calculus. If you do A-levels, the mechanics part of the A-level maths course is probably the most similar thing to undergrad physics that you are doing now.

The topics you study are the same as in A-level physics though. A possibly incomplete list is:
-Mechanics (but with lots of vectors and also calculus)
-Electromagnetism (again with lots of vectors and calculus; it turns out that just 4 equations can describe all classical electromagnetic phenomena, and these equations involve calculus and vectors)
-Thermodynamics/statistical physics (this is less maths-heavy but maths is still in there)
-Astrophysics
-Particle/nuclear physics
-Quantum mechanics

A big theme in physics is conserved quantities. For example, why is momentum conserved in collisions (hint: Newton's 3rd law). Why is energy only sometimes conserved? You do this stuff in more detail; it turns out, for example, that the relation P.E + K.E = constant is valid provided the work done when moving an object from point A to point B depends only on those two points and not on the point (edit: I mean path) joining them.

TL;DR: If you like the mechanics bit of A-level maths, you'll probably like physics. Other people who have *actually* got a degree in physics are welcome to contradict me!
Last edited by theOldBean; 1 month ago
1
reply
AlicanK01
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 weeks ago
#9
I'm in the same boat, currently trying to decide between Physics or Computer Science
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should the school day be extended to help students catch up?

Yes (21)
31.34%
No (46)
68.66%

Watched Threads

View All