Have crap GCSEs but think I can get 45 Distinction credits on Access Course..

Watch
RedPanda100
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
Hi,

I'm a 28 year old mature student studying Law, Politics and International Relations at Access Level. I flunked my GCSEs quite badly, did practically no revision and turned up pissed to my science exams because my gf had just dumped me, so ended up with ABBBCCE (the A being in English lit and the E being in maths, got Us in all science subjects). But after growing up a bit I've given education another go and surprisingly I'm finding it to be a breeze to be honest. I've achieved distinctions in all assignments without really being challenged, and I've looked at the assignment briefs on the later modules and they look even easier than the ones I've already turned in. I have a genuine interest in the subject matter of the course, which honestly helps a huge deal.

I've applied to Royal Holloway, Sussex, Kent, Reading and Surrey. Surrey rejected me on the grounds I didnt have a maths GCSE (thought it was a BSci qualification if that matters) but Kent and Reading have made conditional offers. I'm yet to hear from the other two.

Anyway, my main question is: if I was to pass the Access Course with 45 Distinction Credits, how willing would top universities be to overlook the lack of a maths GCSE? I have applied to Politics and International Relations/International Relations courses at the universities I've mentioned, and as far as I'm aware the application of any mathematics on these courses is more or less non-existent, so would it matter? Cheers
Last edited by RedPanda100; 6 months ago
0
reply
University of South Wales
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
(Original post by RedPanda100)
Hi,

I'm a 28 year old mature student studying Law, Politics and International Relations at Access Level. I flunked my GCSEs quite badly, did practically no revision and turned up pissed to my science exams because my gf had just dumped me, so ended up with ABBBCCE (the A being in English lit and the E being in maths, got Us in all science subjects). But after growing up a bit I've given education another go and surprisingly I'm finding it to be a breeze to be honest. I've achieved distinctions in all assignments without really being challenged, and I've looked at the assignment briefs on the later modules and they look even easier than the ones I've already turned in. I have a genuine interest in the subject matter of the course, which honestly helps a huge deal.

I've applied to Royal Holloway, Sussex, Kent, Reading and Surrey. Surrey rejected me on the grounds I didnt have a maths GCSE (thought it was a BSci qualification if that matters) but Kent and Reading have made conditional offers. I'm yet to hear from the other two.

Anyway, my main question is: if I was to pass the Access Course with 45 Distinction Credits, how willing would top universities be to overlook the lack of a maths GCSE? I have applied to Politics and International Relations/International Relations courses at the universities I've mentioned, and as far as I'm aware the application of any mathematics on these courses is more or less non-existent, so would it matter? Cheers
Hi RedPanda100 at USW we would look more favourably at the level 3 (Access) qualification for the majority of our courses. For some courses however the GCSE requirement is strict, it really depends on the course. I would advise contacting the universities that you've applied to ask what flexibility there is in relation to the GCSE requirement. Each university will take a different approach, but you may find that they will be focused more on the Access grades rather that what you achieved at GCSE. Hope this helps! Thanks, Carrie
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 months ago
#3
I think they are generally strict about gcses or equivalent in maths and english. Why not resit maths?
0
reply
adam271
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 months ago
#4
For whatever reason getting at least a C in English and Mathematics is a requirement for most universities.
This is not just universities that has this requirement but employers, colleges and probably the Army. I am sure there are many others as well.

I'd just bite the bullet and get your GCSE in math done as soon as its reasonably possible.
For a C grade in maths its pretty easy to achieve if your halfway decent at math. You take the higher paper as it has a lower grade boundary and you can wing a lot of the paper. (Well I did)
0
reply
RedPanda100
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#5
Yeah, I had considered resitting maths, but I was told the Access course would be quite intensive and my grades may suffer if I studied for it simultaneously. I'm not finding that to be the case though, so I probably could have opted to take it alongside my maths course, I certainly regret not making the decision to do so now anyway.
0
reply
University of South Wales
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 months ago
#6
(Original post by RedPanda100)
Yeah, I had considered resitting maths, but I was told the Access course would be quite intensive and my grades may suffer if I studied for it simultaneously. I'm not finding that to be the case though, so I probably could have opted to take it alongside my maths course, I certainly regret not making the decision to do so now anyway.
Hi RedPanda100 What course were you hoping to study at university? Let me know if I can help further, you'll get there, keep smiling Rebecca
0
reply
Arden University
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 months ago
#7
(Original post by RedPanda100)
Hi,

I'm a 28 year old mature student studying Law, Politics and International Relations at Access Level. I flunked my GCSEs quite badly, did practically no revision and turned up pissed to my science exams because my gf had just dumped me, so ended up with ABBBCCE (the A being in English lit and the E being in maths, got Us in all science subjects). But after growing up a bit I've given education another go and surprisingly I'm finding it to be a breeze to be honest. I've achieved distinctions in all assignments without really being challenged, and I've looked at the assignment briefs on the later modules and they look even easier than the ones I've already turned in. I have a genuine interest in the subject matter of the course, which honestly helps a huge deal.

I've applied to Royal Holloway, Sussex, Kent, Reading and Surrey. Surrey rejected me on the grounds I didnt have a maths GCSE (thought it was a BSci qualification if that matters) but Kent and Reading have made conditional offers. I'm yet to hear from the other two.

Anyway, my main question is: if I was to pass the Access Course with 45 Distinction Credits, how willing would top universities be to overlook the lack of a maths GCSE? I have applied to Politics and International Relations/International Relations courses at the universities I've mentioned, and as far as I'm aware the application of any mathematics on these courses is more or less non-existent, so would it matter? Cheers
RedPanda100
Hello! I teach on an Access program, you have a big advantage because your three subjects are quite similar in terms of academic skills required (a bit like social sciences; criminology, sociology, psychology). Courses such as Nursing are really difficult to get distinctions across the board because they involve science and social science modules

In terms of the GCSE's it does depend what career you want to go into. If it is Nursing or Primary Teaching you need the GCSE's as a professional requirement (plus science for Midwifery). It is worth talking to the admissions tutors at the Universities - I would consider doing GCSE Maths at some point online or at your local FE college as it will open up more opportunities

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think mandatory Relationships and Sex Education in secondary schools is a good idea?

Yes (357)
84%
No (68)
16%

Watched Threads

View All