2 Degrees in 4 years - is it possible?

Watch
JApple
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
So I took a gap year followed by deferring for a year thanks to our new pal Covid.

When I first applied, my degree choice was obvious but now they’ve added a degree which is also ideal for me. Now I’m stuck trying to choose between two degrees both of which are perfect for me and what I want to do. I’ve seen on UCAS that it’s possible to do two degrees alongside each other but this may vary between each university. I know it’d be a lot of work, no free time, barely having the time to go to the loo but I cannot put into words how grateful I would be to do both of them. Neither of them have post graduate options and I know the UK government will only fund one but given if I can find the money, do you reckon I could do both at the same time? Or am I over ambitious here? I’m very confused now so any help is greatly appreciated
0
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
(Original post by JApple)
So I took a gap year followed by deferring for a year thanks to our new pal Covid.

When I first applied, my degree choice was obvious but now they’ve added a degree which is also ideal for me. Now I’m stuck trying to choose between two degrees both of which are perfect for me and what I want to do. I’ve seen on UCAS that it’s possible to do two degrees alongside each other but this may vary between each university. I know it’d be a lot of work, no free time, barely having the time to go to the loo but I cannot put into words how grateful I would be to do both of them. Neither of them have post graduate options and I know the UK government will only fund one but given if I can find the money, do you reckon I could do both at the same time? Or am I over ambitious here? I’m very confused now so any help is greatly appreciated
No, this is a terrible idea unless the two courses have an official joint option, or you take a 4 year MSci course with an integrated BSc + Masters joined together. Otherwise the workload will kill you and you will have endless clashes between lectures, tutorials and exams. Course 1 will simply say no if you ask if you can miss their exam so you can take another one at course 2.
Last edited by Mr Wednesday; 1 week ago
3
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 week ago
#3
(Original post by JApple)
So I took a gap year followed by deferring for a year thanks to our new pal Covid.

When I first applied, my degree choice was obvious but now they’ve added a degree which is also ideal for me. Now I’m stuck trying to choose between two degrees both of which are perfect for me and what I want to do. I’ve seen on UCAS that it’s possible to do two degrees alongside each other but this may vary between each university. I know it’d be a lot of work, no free time, barely having the time to go to the loo but I cannot put into words how grateful I would be to do both of them. Neither of them have post graduate options and I know the UK government will only fund one but given if I can find the money, do you reckon I could do both at the same time? Or am I over ambitious here? I’m very confused now so any help is greatly appreciated
You need to ask the university concerned directly. Normally university regulations will prevent registration on more than one degree at any time.
0
reply
jonathanemptage
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by JApple)
So I took a gap year followed by deferring for a year thanks to our new pal Covid.

When I first applied, my degree choice was obvious but now they’ve added a degree which is also ideal for me. Now I’m stuck trying to choose between two degrees both of which are perfect for me and what I want to do. I’ve seen on UCAS that it’s possible to do two degrees alongside each other but this may vary between each university. I know it’d be a lot of work, no free time, barely having the time to go to the loo but I cannot put into words how grateful I would be to do both of them. Neither of them have post graduate options and I know the UK government will only fund one but given if I can find the money, do you reckon I could do both at the same time? Or am I over ambitious here? I’m very confused now so any help is greatly appreciated
I would really not recommend doing the two in parallel but you could do the two one after the other. A degree is very hard work your expected to spend about 35 hours a week (overall) on it (you often spend more I'd really consider doing it that way I mean you'd be 26/27 at the end but if you truly want to do both of these degrees do it that way the other way wold be too hard and probably negitivlt affect your mental health even if your really mentally strong it would be really hard.
0
reply
McGinger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 week ago
#5
You will not be allowed to register for two full time degrees courses at once.
Its that simple.
2
reply
yeye21
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by McGinger)
You will not be allowed to register for two full time degrees courses at once.
Its that simple.
I don't understand why though? Like why can't I do Maths and English?
0
reply
McGinger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
Can I suggest that you phone up some leading Universities are ask them if you can do two undergraduate degrees at once - and then you can let us know what their responses are.
0
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 days ago
#8
(Original post by yeye21)
I don't understand why though? Like why can't I do Maths and English?
Maths course, university A, finals exam Monday 10-12,
English course, university B, finals exam Monday 10-12

Which do you take and why, which do you automatically fail by not attending ? Now repeat for all assessed activities over 3 years.
1
reply
yeye21
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 days ago
#9
(Original post by Mr Wednesday)
Maths course, university A, finals exam Monday 10-12,
English course, university B, finals exam Monday 10-12

Which do you take and why, which do you automatically fail by not attending ? Now repeat for all assessed activities over 3 years.
I would talk to one of the universities and explain the clash
0
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 days ago
#10
(Original post by yeye21)
I would talk to one of the universities and explain the clash
For potentially 100+ clashes for tutorials, exams and labs over multiple years, nope, not going to happen. All of these would need to be rescheduled, new exam papers written, rooms booked, exams invigilated etc, why would they spend the time and effort (literarily 100s of hours of staff time) on that when you are not prioritising their course ?
Last edited by Mr Wednesday; 6 days ago
0
reply
yeye21
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 days ago
#11
(Original post by Mr Wednesday)
For potentially 100+ clashes for tutorials, exams and labs over multiple years, nope, not going to happen. All of these would need to be rescheduled, new exam papers written, rooms booked, exams invigilated etc, why would they spend the time and effort (literarily 100s of hours of staff time) on that when you are not prioritising their course ?
Well I would be aiming for a first for both and trying my best to get there
0
reply
McGinger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 days ago
#12
I think all of trying to advise you on this have reached the limit of our patience.
1
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 days ago
#13
(Original post by yeye21)
Well I would be aiming for a first for both and trying my best to get there
Sure, but you missed the bit where you are now costing the university literally 100s of extra staff hours and £££ because you are not fully engaging with the course for no benefit to them. Sure, universities do spend this extra effort supporting a small number of students with disabilities, but not “ordinary” students that don’t want to attend a scheduled session because they have decided something else is more important.
0
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#14
Report 6 days ago
#14
(Original post by yeye21)
Well I would be aiming for a first for both and trying my best to get there
Sure, but you missed the bit where you are now costing the university literally 100s of extra staff hours and £££ because you are not fully engaging with the course for no benefit to them. Sure, universities do spend this extra effort supporting a small number of students with disabilities, but not “ordinary” students that don’t want to attend a scheduled session because they have decided something else is more important.

(Original post by McGinger)
I think all of trying to advise you on this have reached the limit of our patience.
Yes, but now we are into "comedy value" territory .
0
reply
yeye21
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#15
Report 6 days ago
#15
(Original post by Mr Wednesday)
Sure, but you missed the bit where you are now costing the university literally 100s of extra staff hours and £££ because you are not fully engaging with the course for no benefit to them. Sure, universities do spend this extra effort supporting a small number of students with disabilities, but not “ordinary” students that don’t want to attend a scheduled session because they have decided something else is more important.
that might be a bit of an exaggeration. Plus it's only the exams that are the issues, not the classes. Also even if there was a clash I am fortunate to have access to more than 1 electronic device.
0
reply
username11235813
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 6 days ago
#16
(Original post by yeye21)
that might be a bit of an exaggeration. Plus it's only the exams that are the issues, not the classes. Also even if there was a clash I am fortunate to have access to more than 1 electronic device.
It doesn't exactly work like that... it'll probably be in person at some point in the next 4 years.
0
reply
Cat Tonge (YSJU Student Ambassador)
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#17
Report 6 days ago
#17
(Original post by JApple)
So I took a gap year followed by deferring for a year thanks to our new pal Covid.

When I first applied, my degree choice was obvious but now they’ve added a degree which is also ideal for me. Now I’m stuck trying to choose between two degrees both of which are perfect for me and what I want to do. I’ve seen on UCAS that it’s possible to do two degrees alongside each other but this may vary between each university. I know it’d be a lot of work, no free time, barely having the time to go to the loo but I cannot put into words how grateful I would be to do both of them. Neither of them have post graduate options and I know the UK government will only fund one but given if I can find the money, do you reckon I could do both at the same time? Or am I over ambitious here? I’m very confused now so any help is greatly appreciated
Hi JApple,

I would suggest that to take two entirely separate degrees parallel to one another would be incredibly difficult, not only as you say will you only get funding for one but I would put money on this not even being possible and only being able to do one at a time. You are however, more than welcome to do one AFTER the other. This would mean not only getting a student loan for each, but also it would mean you could dedicate your time and effort into getting the best grade that you can for each rather than potential getting a lower grade at the end having split your time across the two. I would also suggest considering how you work, for example would you be able to handle the work load if a single degree has three modules a semester, 4 assessments and an exam will you be able to cope with that doubly over? Would you be able to handle the emotional and wellbeing strains that you might experience?

If your utterly desperate to do both I would suggest looking to see if there is a course of duel honours in these subjects. You would be able to study both subject, get a single degree and be able to dedicate all your time to that single degree getting you the best grade possible.

If your still set on this I would suggest talking to a university support team as they might be able to give you more specific guidance and even tell you if this is possible at all or not, which I don't think you can.

I hope this helps
Cat, York St John University Student Ambassador
3
reply
Mr Wednesday
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 6 days ago
#18
(Original post by yeye21)
that might be a bit of an exaggeration. Plus it's only the exams that are the issues, not the classes. Also even if there was a clash I am fortunate to have access to more than 1 electronic device.
Most courses will have a broad range of activities, projects and group work where you are scheduled to be in attendance and that attendance is recorded and assessed, it’s not just exams, its everything you do apart from pre-recorded lectures (which are a bit of a covid special this year). I think you just have no concept of how much time and effort goes into delivering a course and the difficulty of scheduling to avoid clashes during the SAME degree, let alone across 2 different courses and institutions. But to emphasise what PQ said, just about every university explicitly bans students from being registered on two courses at once.
3
reply
McGinger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#19
Report 6 days ago
#19
(Original post by yeye21)
that might be a bit of an exaggeration. Plus it's only the exams that are the issues, not the classes. Also even if there was a clash I am fortunate to have access to more than 1 electronic device.
You don't actually have a clue what doing a degree involves do you.
2
reply
username11235813
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 6 days ago
#20
(Original post by McGinger)
You don't actually have a clue what doing a degree involves do you.
Maybe a part time Open University degree would work for them? Something they could fit around everything else...
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Following the government's announcement, do you think you will be awarded a fair grade this year?

Yes (257)
51.81%
No (239)
48.19%

Watched Threads

View All