What jobs can you get straight after leaving uni with a biological science degree?

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diffcolours
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Particularly science related?
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#StressedStudent
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(Original post by diffcolours)
Particularly science related?
pharmaceutical industry- maybe research and development...?
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by diffcolours)
Particularly science related?
Hey diffcolours ! My friend did this degree and she began her career in the drug manufacturing/testing industry, and moved up through her department quite quickly to become a Senior Scientist Opportunities can come up to work in pharmaceuticals, toxicology, and biomanufacturing. Other areas that are quite popular amongst graduates, for example, are being employed by the NHS or the private sector doing things like diagnosis, screening, monitoring and research.
You could also think a little bit broader- and even consider careers in areas like the food and drink industry, forensic science, or work in the Education sector as a Lab Technician/Assistant, which would still give you the chance to keep the science related things you enjoy!
I'd say this type of degree is really diverse and can turn itself to lots of different industries!

Hope this helps a bit! Are you already studying or are you still thinking of your options at the moment?

- Caitlin
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diffcolours
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Hi thank you for all that!!
I’m just wondering if what you mentioned, like being employed by the nhs/ private sector for diagnosis, screening, monitoring; or the industry your friend got into, if all that can be straight out of uni w ur BSc without needing work experience in those areas like for example when it comes to screening. Like I feel like you would need to do a year or two more of education to get into a health care job and into the NHS? Did your friend start her career right after uni?

Also do you think there’s a significant difference between the way biomedical science is viewed and the way Biosciences degree is viewed? Is one more favourable by employers, specifically the NHS?
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by diffcolours)
Hi thank you for all that!!
I’m just wondering if what you mentioned, like being employed by the nhs/ private sector for diagnosis, screening, monitoring; or the industry your friend got into, if all that can be straight out of uni w ur BSc without needing work experience in those areas like for example when it comes to screening. Like I feel like you would need to do a year or two more of education to get into a health care job and into the NHS? Did your friend start her career right after uni?

Also do you think there’s a significant difference between the way biomedical science is viewed and the way Biosciences degree is viewed? Is one more favourable by employers, specifically the NHS?
diffcolours Hey! My friend went straight in to her role, and I think some of her classmates did similar or stayed on to carry out a Masters research project She didn't have any work experience as far as I'm aware- she used her experience of working in labs throughout uni combined with her dissertation project when it came to the interview stage. Everyone's journey after uni is totally unique in a way, and at least you have lots of options you can explore! Work experience can definitely help (as is the case for any degree), but as long as you can effectively show that you're capable and competent and understand the challenges of working in the industry then that should set you up well. Often work experience isn't strictly required for entry level roles, but if your competition all have some sort of experience then they may have a slight edge so could be worth bearing in mind.

For your second q- I'd be inclined to say no, but that obviously if you want to go on to something within the NHS then having the Biomedical element is a plus. At Strathclyde our degrees are very broad based up until the end of your second year (everyone studies the same things- Immunology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology and Microbiology), and then those who choose the Biomedical Science pathway follow a more structured curriculum that's designed to set graduates up with skills for future NHS employment. That's not to say that students who choose Biomolecular Science, or one of the specific areas (i.e. Pharmacology) are less likely to work in the NHS- it just means they have a bit more flexibility in choosing their elective modules.

It's maybe worth getting in touch with a careers advisor to see if they have any specific info on this within the sector, as I'm far from an expert on this sorry! Maybe you could use Unibuddy or something like that too to speak to current students or academics working in the area too? I'm sure if you work hard in your degree and keep your mind open to lots of different opportunities then you'll end up in a great position

Best of luck! Hope that helps a bit.
- Caitlin
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diffcolours
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diffcolours Hey! My friend went straight in to her role, and I think some of her classmates did similar or stayed on to carry out a Masters research project She didn't have any work experience as far as I'm aware- she used her experience of working in labs throughout uni combined with her dissertation project when it came to the interview stage. Everyone's journey after uni is totally unique in a way, and at least you have lots of options you can explore! Work experience can definitely help (as is the case for any degree), but as long as you can effectively show that you're capable and competent and understand the challenges of working in the industry then that should set you up well. Often work experience isn't strictly required for entry level roles, but if your competition all have some sort of experience then they may have a slight edge so could be worth bearing in mind.

For your second q- I'd be inclined to say no, but that obviously if you want to go on to something within the NHS then having the Biomedical element is a plus. At Strathclyde our degrees are very broad based up until the end of your second year (everyone studies the same things- Immunology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology and Microbiology), and then those who choose the Biomedical Science pathway follow a more structured curriculum that's designed to set graduates up with skills for future NHS employment. That's not to say that students who choose Biomolecular Science, or one of the specific areas (i.e. Pharmacology) are less likely to work in the NHS- it just means they have a bit more flexibility in choosing their elective modules.

It's maybe worth getting in touch with a careers advisor to see if they have any specific info on this within the sector, as I'm far from an expert on this sorry! Maybe you could use Unibuddy or something like that too to speak to current students or academics working in the area too? I'm sure if you work hard in your degree and keep your mind open to lots of different opportunities then you'll end up in a great position

Best of luck! Hope that helps a bit.
- Caitlin
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Thank youuu!!! 🤗🤗🤗
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sathy606
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(Original post by diffcolours)
Particularly science related?
A job working for the NHS as a technician or medical lab assistant. Perhaps an associate practitioner job for the NHS. Or you could get a job working for a company like UCB, which is more research and development based. Another option is going down the scientist route, working for the NHS.
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