Advantages of doing a part time MSc Psychology conversion??

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SaraSmyth
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Hello, I am dithering over whether to do a conversion course full or part time. Has anyone already gone through this decision process? I am thinking that part time may be better to give me more time to get work experience and also work myself. I don’t want to do a quick conversion and have nothing else on my cv. Any thoughts? I live in the same city as the unis I am applying to so no extra accommodation costs involved..thank you
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hazelmarie_dm
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(Original post by SaraSmyth)
Hello, I am dithering over whether to do a conversion course full or part time. Has anyone already gone through this decision process? I am thinking that part time may be better to give me more time to get work experience and also work myself. I don’t want to do a quick conversion and have nothing else on my cv. Any thoughts? I live in the same city as the unis I am applying to so no extra accommodation costs involved..thank you
Hi SaraSmyth, congrats on making the decision to do a conversion course, that's so cool

Though I'm not in the exact same position as you - there are some similarities. Out of interest, what was your undergrad in?

It's also great that you won't have extra accommodation costs because that is another reason people are almost 'forced' to go part time so they can fund accommodation, at least that way you can be flexible with your choice and accommodation isn't something you need to worry about which is nice!

Almost reversely to you, I did a psychology undergrad degree at Exeter and now hoping to convert to Nutrition through a masters... and I'm having the same issue as you in terms of deciding whether to do it full time or part time...theres a lot to consider! Though I am worried about accom costs too haha.

What are you hoping to do with your psych conversion after you gain the qualification? That might help you answer your own question

Some people even do a masters can still take up a couple hours a week of part time work/volunteering around their studies to gain some experience so thats something you could consider if you were leaning towards full time.

Another thing I was going to mention is that I ALWAYS see job ads for newly qualified psych grads for roles like SEN teaching assistants etc and they often don't think they often require much previous experience as they train you up for the role - obviously this isn't for everyone though. So I wouldn't worry that even if you did a full time conversion you wouldn't have any job opportunities straight away...there will be some options I'm sure...but I suppose if you're looking for something very specific after you get your MSc then maybe getting more relevant experience alongside your studies could be helpful.

The first thing I would say is that I really don't think there are any 'wrong' answers, if you do a full time conversion then you have a whole new year following that to get some work experience with no other distractions (that you wouldn't have if you did it part time)!

On the other hand, if you do it part time maybe you will benefit from having the modules a bit more spread out and maybe have a better work-life balance because you're not only studying? Obviously a Psych conversion is super cool but obviously hard because you have to fit in all the core BPS modules (that us undergrads did over 3 years) into a one year (well, 1 year's worth) course.

It depends how you work - some people like to do a masters in one hit, get it done and out of the way so you have time to plan your next step...other people prefer to mix it up and work alongside studying (albeit it, studying for 'longer').

I'm not sure if this has been helpful at all, I really know your struggle because I can't decide either, but my advice would be to go with your gut reaction because only you will know how you work best Personally I know that I'll probably benefit from having my modules spread out over 2 years so I can focus on things other than studying and have one foot in the 'real world'...but equally I do think there are a lot of perks to doing it full time within one year.

It's a tricky one! Good luck with everything, Hazel x
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SaraSmyth
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(Original post by hazelmarie_dm)
Hi SaraSmyth, congrats on making the decision to do a conversion course, that's so cool

Though I'm not in the exact same position as you - there are some similarities. Out of interest, what was your undergrad in?

It's also great that you won't have extra accommodation costs because that is another reason people are almost 'forced' to go part time so they can fund accommodation, at least that way you can be flexible with your choice and accommodation isn't something you need to worry about which is nice!

Almost reversely to you, I did a psychology undergrad degree at Exeter and now hoping to convert to Nutrition through a masters... and I'm having the same issue as you in terms of deciding whether to do it full time or part time...theres a lot to consider! Though I am worried about accom costs too haha.

What are you hoping to do with your psych conversion after you gain the qualification? That might help you answer your own question

Some people even do a masters can still take up a couple hours a week of part time work/volunteering around their studies to gain some experience so thats something you could consider if you were leaning towards full time.

Another thing I was going to mention is that I ALWAYS see job ads for newly qualified psych grads for roles like SEN teaching assistants etc and they often don't think they often require much previous experience as they train you up for the role - obviously this isn't for everyone though. So I wouldn't worry that even if you did a full time conversion you wouldn't have any job opportunities straight away...there will be some options I'm sure...but I suppose if you're looking for something very specific after you get your MSc then maybe getting more relevant experience alongside your studies could be helpful.

The first thing I would say is that I really don't think there are any 'wrong' answers, if you do a full time conversion then you have a whole new year following that to get some work experience with no other distractions (that you wouldn't have if you did it part time)!

On the other hand, if you do it part time maybe you will benefit from having the modules a bit more spread out and maybe have a better work-life balance because you're not only studying? Obviously a Psych conversion is super cool but obviously hard because you have to fit in all the core BPS modules (that us undergrads did over 3 years) into a one year (well, 1 year's worth) course.

It depends how you work - some people like to do a masters in one hit, get it done and out of the way so you have time to plan your next step...other people prefer to mix it up and work alongside studying (albeit it, studying for 'longer').

I'm not sure if this has been helpful at all, I really know your struggle because I can't decide either, but my advice would be to go with your gut reaction because only you will know how you work best Personally I know that I'll probably benefit from having my modules spread out over 2 years so I can focus on things other than studying and have one foot in the 'real world'...but equally I do think there are a lot of perks to doing it full time within one year.

It's a tricky one! Good luck with everything, Hazel x
Wow Hazel, thank you so much for taking the time to reply at length and your comments have been really helpful.

Thinking about what you have said I am going to do it part time. My background is law, I was a solicitor and then retrained as a yoga teacher.

My hopes now are to spend time in research and academia, maybe writing article and hosting events. So I think over 2 years makes more sense as I will be able to process the new information and get to know the uni and faculty too. I would like to do a doctorate afterwards so the more time I have in labs and volunteering the better.

One year goes so quickly and it would be a lot of pressure as i have to work part time too plus I have 2 small children.

What are you going to do??
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Arden University
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(Original post by SaraSmyth)
Hello, I am dithering over whether to do a conversion course full or part time. Has anyone already gone through this decision process? I am thinking that part time may be better to give me more time to get work experience and also work myself. I don’t want to do a quick conversion and have nothing else on my cv. Any thoughts? I live in the same city as the unis I am applying to so no extra accommodation costs involved..thank you
Hey SaraSmyth,

I am currently doing a Psychology Conversion Masters online part time, I decided I would not be able to commit to doing one full time as it would mean giving up my job and losing out financially but still wanted to change my career path and the mundane routine I was stuck in. During lockdown I doubled up on modules as I had the time and actually found it quite tiring studying all the time. I like to know I have understood something before moving on, doing my course part time gives me that opportunity to work at my own pace. I see work as a break from studying and vice versa! Our lecturers are also quite flexible when it comes to booking 1-2-1 sessions and live sessions and often these are held at the most convenient times for us which means that I don't miss out on too much whilst at work either.

Hope that gives you a bit of an insight into part time studying.

Abigail
Arden University Student Ambassador
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SaraSmyth
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(Original post by Arden University)
Hey SaraSmyth,

I am currently doing a Psychology Conversion Masters online part time, I decided I would not be able to commit to doing one full time as it would mean giving up my job and losing out financially but still wanted to change my career path and the mundane routine I was stuck in. During lockdown I doubled up on modules as I had the time and actually found it quite tiring studying all the time. I like to know I have understood something before moving on, doing my course part time gives me that opportunity to work at my own pace. I see work as a break from studying and vice versa! Our lecturers are also quite flexible when it comes to booking 1-2-1 sessions and live sessions and often these are held at the most convenient times for us which means that I don't miss out on too much whilst at work either.

Hope that gives you a bit of an insight into part time studying.

Abigail
Arden University Student Ambassador
Yes thank you and I think I am going to change my applications to part time. Makes more sense
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