Too Much Exercise?

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Crimson7777777
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I am currently bordering on overweight according to my BMI, and my diet isn't good at all. When I get into uni in September, I am going to use this as a chance to get in shape and healthy, by eating healthy, taking the stairs etc.

I'm not one who enjoys exercise, but will start doing it when I get to uni. As I say, I don't particularly like sports but was going to aim for 3 sessions a week, either one run and two swims or two runs and one swim (runs ~ 2 or 3k, building to 5).

Would this be considered in a good range or would this be classed as overworking it (don't want to cause more damage than good)?
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Otherdjrj
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It’s fine. Considering your health etc, perhaps start off slowly by going for a brisk walk every other day or something. Then slowly build it up to running 5k and swimming.

Obvs idk u but it might be more sustainable and realistic to start off by simply going for a daily walk instead of turning from a couch potato into Mo Farah in one week
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Surnia
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Why are you waiting until September? Thats another 7 months of umhealthy lifestyle. You can start now by learning to cook healthy meals, go for a walk or bike ride and exercise around the house; step-ups on stairs, dips on chairs, cans or bottles as hand-weights.
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aurimaspra
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(Original post by Crimson7777777)
I am currently bordering on overweight according to my BMI, and my diet isn't good at all. When I get into uni in September, I am going to use this as a chance to get in shape and healthy, by eating healthy, taking the stairs etc.

I'm not one who enjoys exercise, but will start doing it when I get to uni. As I say, I don't particularly like sports but was going to aim for 3 sessions a week, either one run and two swims or two runs and one swim (runs ~ 2 or 3k, building to 5).

Would this be considered in a good range or would this be classed as overworking it (don't want to cause more damage than good)?
I am not a certified fitness instructor, just a passionate, fitness freak, 17 year old with 3 years of fitness experience so take things I say at your own precaution.

To start with, BMI is a load of SH*T. It is completely inaccurate and you should never base yourself off a BMI scale. Any bodybuilder that has a lot of mass is technically "overweight" or "obese" so it's just completely useless...

To respond to your question, see how you feel. No one can tell you how much is too much for your body, only you can answer that. If you feel like you're always sore even after recovery days maybe that's a sign that you're overtraining, and overtraining can lead to serious injuries. 2k and 3k are still big distances for a beginner so think about doing maybe 1-1.5k to begin with. Soreness could just be due to DOMS and make sure to stretch to reduce amounts of lactic acid building up which can also lead to cramps and pains etc.

Also, diet is just as important if not more important than the exercise. Without a good diet you will not lose weight and quite frankly depending how bad it is you could feel really ill, drowsy etc. Being in good shape is 60% diet 40% exercise.

Feel free to ask any other questions.
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Surnia
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(Original post by aurimaspra)
To start with, BMI is a load of SH*T. It is completely inaccurate and you should never base yourself off a BMI scale. Any bodybuilder that has a lot of mass is technically "overweight" or "obese" so it's just completely useless...
No it's not; it's a good indicator when used in conjunction with waist size and lifestyle. And it's good enough for organisations like the Armed Forces to use in this way; we pass rugby players who over the BMI because we look at the whole picture.
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Natalie Pate
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No this doesn't cause damage to you, this is good for starting, but remember you have to eat a good diet. Make a good nutrition diet plan for you after a workout, eat a healthy diet and avoid all types of junk food. Otherwise, your hard work will become zero in the end.
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aurimaspra
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(Original post by Surnia)
No it's not; it's a good indicator when used in conjunction with waist size and lifestyle. And it's good enough for organisations like the Armed Forces to use in this way; we pass rugby players who over the BMI because we look at the whole picture.
"BMI is an inaccurate measure of body fat content and does not take into account muscle mass, bone density, overall body composition, and racial and sex differences." source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...20Pennsylvania.

stop spreading lies it's seriously annoying. BMI is generally very oversimplified and for someone who wants to accurately measure themselves it is an awful method. it is never a good indicator for anybody who has stepped in the gym or does any sports.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by aurimaspra)
"BMI is an inaccurate measure of body fat content and does not take into account muscle mass, bone density, overall body composition, and racial and sex differences." source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...20Pennsylvania.

stop spreading lies it's seriously annoying. BMI is generally very oversimplified and for someone who wants to accurately measure themselves it is an awful method. it is never a good indicator for anybody who has stepped in the gym or does any sports.
Pretty sure if OP had considerable amount of muscle mass, they wouldn't come on to TSR asking how to lose weight, literally said diet is not good. Also, race and sex has been accounted for in BMI.
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Surnia
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(Original post by aurimaspra)
"BMI is an inaccurate measure of body fat content and does not take into account muscle mass, bone density, overall body composition, and racial and sex differences." source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...20Pennsylvania.

stop spreading lies it's seriously annoying. BMI is generally very oversimplified and for someone who wants to accurately measure themselves it is an awful method. it is never a good indicator for anybody who has stepped in the gym or does any sports.
I'm not lying, and you've agreed with me by saying accuracy and indication are 2 different things.
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Mason_taylor16
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(Original post by Crimson7777777)
I am currently bordering on overweight according to my BMI, and my diet isn't good at all. When I get into uni in September, I am going to use this as a chance to get in shape and healthy, by eating healthy, taking the stairs etc.

I'm not one who enjoys exercise, but will start doing it when I get to uni. As I say, I don't particularly like sports but was going to aim for 3 sessions a week, either one run and two swims or two runs and one swim (runs ~ 2 or 3k, building to 5).

Would this be considered in a good range or would this be classed as overworking it (don't want to cause more damage than good)?
start today. eat in a calorie deficit by finding out your TDEE. you can eat whatever you want as long as you eat under your TDEE
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illusionz
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(Original post by aurimaspra)
"BMI is an inaccurate measure of body fat content and does not take into account muscle mass, bone density, overall body composition, and racial and sex differences." source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...20Pennsylvania.

stop spreading lies it's seriously annoying. BMI is generally very oversimplified and for someone who wants to accurately measure themselves it is an awful method. it is never a good indicator for anybody who has stepped in the gym or does any sports.
BMI is useful for the average person who does not take strength training seriously. The populations for who BMI is not a useful metric know that it is not useful for them. If you've not trained for a few years already then BMI will still be relevant.

For the average person, BMI is useful and a high BMI is strongly correlated with a number of health issues.
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