GCSE an inspector calls essay

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MissZ123
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
How many marks out of 30? What grade?
How can I improve? I'm aiming for a grade 7/8

How does Priestley present the theme of responsibility in An Inspector Calls?

Priestly presents the theme of responsibility in an Insector Calls, set in 1912, through the ‘everyman’ Eva Smith who commits suicide by drining disinfectant to clean herself from the Birling’s capitalist behaviour. Written in 1945, the Inspector is used as Priestley's mouthpiece to illustrate to the patriarchal society that ‘we are all part of one body’,using Eva as an example. Priestly set the morality play in the Birlings’ rich, and over-satisfied household in an attempt to make socialist views more prominent in Edwardian society.

One way that the theme of responsibility is presented is through Mr Birling's rude and unsympathetic attitude towards Eva who is a figure of the working class. Mr Birling’s capitalist views personifies the upper classes’ disrespect and neglect towards the poor as he ‘can’t accept any responsibility’ because ‘it would be very awkward’ This shows that he is unwilling take responsibility because he has never taken any responsibility before, as he has been brought up in a wealthy family, where everything has been provided for him. But also because he believes that Eva's death has nothing to do with him and if it did it would ruin his social status, which was very important to him, and to the upper class in that time. Furthermore, Mr Birling believed that he had no right to take any responsibility because, as an upper class, capitalist businessman, he ‘has to look after himself - and his family too’ His lack of compassion and responsibility is due to his capitalist beliefs. However, the 1945 audience would have known that he was very wrong, as he was also very confident that the ‘titanic is unsinkable’ and that a war will not break out, but the audience knew that the titanic sank and they had just been through war. Priestley aimed to spread his socialist idea of shared responsibility, as Birling's behaviour and actions all had consequences - the death of a young girl. The Inspector, Priesty’s mouthpiece encourages them to be accountable for their actions, and to take responsibility for others. During this time, Priestly believed that capitalism benefits the rich over the poor, but this must change, as shown through the case of Eva.

Another way that the theme of responsibility is presented in the play is Sheila who
learns to accept blame for her actions, taking responsibility, as she is more open-minded. After the inspector left, the Birlings realised that the Inspector was not from the police and so Mr Birling and Gerald felt relieved, knowing that the public will not know and their social status will remain high. However, Sheila sarcastically exclaims, ‘ I suppose we’re all nice people now’ Her ironic tone shows that the moral crimes they commited have still taken place, and she feels guilt. To her, her social status is unimportant, the fact that her actions led to the death of an innocent poor girl, was more important. She had learnt to take responsibility unlike her parents and gerald who remain unaffected by the moral lesson the Inspector taught as ‘it may have all been nonsense’ The older generation, stuck in their narrow-minded, capitalist beliefs, try to redeem themselves by proving that if they forget what had happened with the inspector, then everything will be alright, deflecting they way they treated Eva.

Furthermore, another way that the theme of responsibility is presented in the play is through the inspectors final speech, as he is used as Priestly’s mouthpiece to portray his socialistt views. He tells the family that ‘each one of you helped kill her’, showing that they must accept and take responsibility for their actions as it is evident that their actions led to her death. This is done in an attempt to change the mistakes of the previous generations so the new generation learn about the suffering of the poor, but apart from Eva, ‘there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths still left with us, with their lives, their hopes and fears, their suffering and chance of happiness’
The use of repetition of the number ‘millions’ emphasises the amount of other people who suffer hardships but go by unknown. ‘Eva smiths and John Smiths’ represent the ‘millions’ of the working class. Her name is symbolically significant as ‘Eva refers to the first woman and ‘Smith’ is a common name which can mean any woman, emphasising that Eva is representative of many other people. The inspector warns the Birlings that if they dont change they will be taught in ‘fire blood and anguish’ This could be imagery of the war, which the audience had just experienced or it could be a biblical reference to hellfire, which the Edwardian audience had a belief in. As Britain had experienced war, Mr Birling and his views become less trustworthy as the inspector becomes more trusted by the audience, emphasising Priestly’s views that the would can become hell if it the capitalists do not change and take responsibility

Overall, the theme of responsibility is shown in the play through Mr Birlings refusal to take responsibility, Sheila’s acceptance of her actions and also through the Inspectors final speech, to portray to the audience that by not taking responsibility, people will suffer.
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jasmine_north
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#2
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#2
(Original post by MissZ123)
How many marks out of 30? What grade?
How can I improve? I'm aiming for a grade 7/8

How does Priestley present the theme of responsibility in An Inspector Calls?

Priestly presents the theme of responsibility in an Insector Calls, set in 1912, through the ‘everyman’ Eva Smith who commits suicide by drining disinfectant to clean herself from the Birling’s capitalist behaviour. Written in 1945, the Inspector is used as Priestley's mouthpiece to illustrate to the patriarchal society that ‘we are all part of one body’,using Eva as an example. Priestly set the morality play in the Birlings’ rich, and over-satisfied household in an attempt to make socialist views more prominent in Edwardian society.

One way that the theme of responsibility is presented is through Mr Birling's rude and unsympathetic attitude towards Eva who is a figure of the working class. Mr Birling’s capitalist views personifies the upper classes’ disrespect and neglect towards the poor as he ‘can’t accept any responsibility’ because ‘it would be very awkward’ This shows that he is unwilling take responsibility because he has never taken any responsibility before, as he has been brought up in a wealthy family, where everything has been provided for him. But also because he believes that Eva's death has nothing to do with him and if it did it would ruin his social status, which was very important to him, and to the upper class in that time. Furthermore, Mr Birling believed that he had no right to take any responsibility because, as an upper class, capitalist businessman, he ‘has to look after himself - and his family too’ His lack of compassion and responsibility is due to his capitalist beliefs. However, the 1945 audience would have known that he was very wrong, as he was also very confident that the ‘titanic is unsinkable’ and that a war will not break out, but the audience knew that the titanic sank and they had just been through war. Priestley aimed to spread his socialist idea of shared responsibility, as Birling's behaviour and actions all had consequences - the death of a young girl. The Inspector, Priesty’s mouthpiece encourages them to be accountable for their actions, and to take responsibility for others. During this time, Priestly believed that capitalism benefits the rich over the poor, but this must change, as shown through the case of Eva.

Another way that the theme of responsibility is presented in the play is Sheila who
learns to accept blame for her actions, taking responsibility, as she is more open-minded. After the inspector left, the Birlings realised that the Inspector was not from the police and so Mr Birling and Gerald felt relieved, knowing that the public will not know and their social status will remain high. However, Sheila sarcastically exclaims, ‘ I suppose we’re all nice people now’ Her ironic tone shows that the moral crimes they commited have still taken place, and she feels guilt. To her, her social status is unimportant, the fact that her actions led to the death of an innocent poor girl, was more important. She had learnt to take responsibility unlike her parents and gerald who remain unaffected by the moral lesson the Inspector taught as ‘it may have all been nonsense’ The older generation, stuck in their narrow-minded, capitalist beliefs, try to redeem themselves by proving that if they forget what had happened with the inspector, then everything will be alright, deflecting they way they treated Eva.

Furthermore, another way that the theme of responsibility is presented in the play is through the inspectors final speech, as he is used as Priestly’s mouthpiece to portray his socialistt views. He tells the family that ‘each one of you helped kill her’, showing that they must accept and take responsibility for their actions as it is evident that their actions led to her death. This is done in an attempt to change the mistakes of the previous generations so the new generation learn about the suffering of the poor, but apart from Eva, ‘there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths still left with us, with their lives, their hopes and fears, their suffering and chance of happiness’
The use of repetition of the number ‘millions’ emphasises the amount of other people who suffer hardships but go by unknown. ‘Eva smiths and John Smiths’ represent the ‘millions’ of the working class. Her name is symbolically significant as ‘Eva refers to the first woman and ‘Smith’ is a common name which can mean any woman, emphasising that Eva is representative of many other people. The inspector warns the Birlings that if they dont change they will be taught in ‘fire blood and anguish’ This could be imagery of the war, which the audience had just experienced or it could be a biblical reference to hellfire, which the Edwardian audience had a belief in. As Britain had experienced war, Mr Birling and his views become less trustworthy as the inspector becomes more trusted by the audience, emphasising Priestly’s views that the would can become hell if it the capitalists do not change and take responsibility

Overall, the theme of responsibility is shown in the play through Mr Birlings refusal to take responsibility, Sheila’s acceptance of her actions and also through the Inspectors final speech, to portray to the audience that by not taking responsibility, people will suffer.
Hi! i remember doing an inspector calls for my english GCSE, i now do english a level
The first thing i would say is that you must NOT use quotes in your introduction. Instead, tell the reader what you are doing to be writing about - e.g. a few of your points in mind and lots and lots of context! So so so many marks are given out due to context. But make sure that your context in each paragraph is highly related to your point - you dont want to be including irrelevant context.
be careful not to be too narrative either. try not to explain the whole play because the reader already knows this! to stop being narrative, add quotes! Maybe two per paragraph and analysis!!! analyse all the quotes by using literary terms ( lots of marks for this), so words like metaphor, simile, motif, foreshadowing and stuff like that. Also include what you think Priestly is trying to achieve with the audience by using terms like these in his play.
Overall, i think your essay is really good! and i think that if you keep working on my points that I've said in your future essays you could definitely get that grade 7 or 8!
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helloiambored
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#3
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#3
(Original post by MissZ123)
How many marks out of 30? What grade?
How can I improve? I'm aiming for a grade 7/8

How does Priestley present the theme of responsibility in An Inspector Calls?

Priestly presents the theme of responsibility in an Insector Calls, set in 1912, through the ‘everyman’ Eva Smith who commits suicide by drining disinfectant to clean herself from the Birling’s capitalist behaviour. Written in 1945, the Inspector is used as Priestley's mouthpiece to illustrate to the patriarchal society that ‘we are all part of one body’,using Eva as an example. Priestly set the morality play in the Birlings’ rich, and over-satisfied household in an attempt to make socialist views more prominent in Edwardian society.

One way that the theme of responsibility is presented is through Mr Birling's rude and unsympathetic attitude towards Eva who is a figure of the working class. Mr Birling’s capitalist views personifies the upper classes’ disrespect and neglect towards the poor as he ‘can’t accept any responsibility’ because ‘it would be very awkward’ This shows that he is unwilling take responsibility because he has never taken any responsibility before, as he has been brought up in a wealthy family, where everything has been provided for him. But also because he believes that Eva's death has nothing to do with him and if it did it would ruin his social status, which was very important to him, and to the upper class in that time. Furthermore, Mr Birling believed that he had no right to take any responsibility because, as an upper class, capitalist businessman, he ‘has to look after himself - and his family too’ His lack of compassion and responsibility is due to his capitalist beliefs. However, the 1945 audience would have known that he was very wrong, as he was also very confident that the ‘titanic is unsinkable’ and that a war will not break out, but the audience knew that the titanic sank and they had just been through war. Priestley aimed to spread his socialist idea of shared responsibility, as Birling's behaviour and actions all had consequences - the death of a young girl. The Inspector, Priesty’s mouthpiece encourages them to be accountable for their actions, and to take responsibility for others. During this time, Priestly believed that capitalism benefits the rich over the poor, but this must change, as shown through the case of Eva.

Another way that the theme of responsibility is presented in the play is Sheila who
learns to accept blame for her actions, taking responsibility, as she is more open-minded. After the inspector left, the Birlings realised that the Inspector was not from the police and so Mr Birling and Gerald felt relieved, knowing that the public will not know and their social status will remain high. However, Sheila sarcastically exclaims, ‘ I suppose we’re all nice people now’ Her ironic tone shows that the moral crimes they commited have still taken place, and she feels guilt. To her, her social status is unimportant, the fact that her actions led to the death of an innocent poor girl, was more important. She had learnt to take responsibility unlike her parents and gerald who remain unaffected by the moral lesson the Inspector taught as ‘it may have all been nonsense’ The older generation, stuck in their narrow-minded, capitalist beliefs, try to redeem themselves by proving that if they forget what had happened with the inspector, then everything will be alright, deflecting they way they treated Eva.

Furthermore, another way that the theme of responsibility is presented in the play is through the inspectors final speech, as he is used as Priestly’s mouthpiece to portray his socialistt views. He tells the family that ‘each one of you helped kill her’, showing that they must accept and take responsibility for their actions as it is evident that their actions led to her death. This is done in an attempt to change the mistakes of the previous generations so the new generation learn about the suffering of the poor, but apart from Eva, ‘there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths still left with us, with their lives, their hopes and fears, their suffering and chance of happiness’
The use of repetition of the number ‘millions’ emphasises the amount of other people who suffer hardships but go by unknown. ‘Eva smiths and John Smiths’ represent the ‘millions’ of the working class. Her name is symbolically significant as ‘Eva refers to the first woman and ‘Smith’ is a common name which can mean any woman, emphasising that Eva is representative of many other people. The inspector warns the Birlings that if they dont change they will be taught in ‘fire blood and anguish’ This could be imagery of the war, which the audience had just experienced or it could be a biblical reference to hellfire, which the Edwardian audience had a belief in. As Britain had experienced war, Mr Birling and his views become less trustworthy as the inspector becomes more trusted by the audience, emphasising Priestly’s views that the would can become hell if it the capitalists do not change and take responsibility

Overall, the theme of responsibility is shown in the play through Mr Birlings refusal to take responsibility, Sheila’s acceptance of her actions and also through the Inspectors final speech, to portray to the audience that by not taking responsibility, people will suffer.
this is a really good essay. I am in year 11 so not the best person to mark it out of 30 but I have a question, did you do the question in exam conditions?
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MissZ123
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#4
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(Original post by helloiambored)
this is a really good essay. I am in year 11 so not the best person to mark it out of 30 but I have a question, did you do the question in exam conditions?
Sort of. I did take a little longer than 45 minutes but that just because im working on improving the quality of my writing first.
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MissZ123
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#5
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#5
(Original post by jasmine_north)
Hi! i remember doing an inspector calls for my english GCSE, i now do english a level
The first thing i would say is that you must NOT use quotes in your introduction. Instead, tell the reader what you are doing to be writing about - e.g. a few of your points in mind and lots and lots of context! So so so many marks are given out due to context. But make sure that your context in each paragraph is highly related to your point - you dont want to be including irrelevant context.
be careful not to be too narrative either. try not to explain the whole play because the reader already knows this! to stop being narrative, add quotes! Maybe two per paragraph and analysis!!! analyse all the quotes by using literary terms ( lots of marks for this), so words like metaphor, simile, motif, foreshadowing and stuff like that. Also include what you think Priestly is trying to achieve with the audience by using terms like these in his play.
Overall, i think your essay is really good! and i think that if you keep working on my points that I've said in your future essays you could definitely get that grade 7 or 8!
Thank you for your advice. It is really helpful! I don't usually add quotes to the introduction but looking at someone else's essay, I thought it might be a good idea. But thank you for the advice!
Last edited by MissZ123; 1 year ago
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helloiambored
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#6
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#6
(Original post by MissZ123)
Sort of. I did take a little longer than 45 minutes but that just because im working on improving the quality of my writing first.
Ah ok well done tho its a really good essay!
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Kerzen
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#7
Be sure to check the spellings in your essay, especially of the writer's name.

PS Punctuation in places too.
Last edited by Kerzen; 1 year ago
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MissZ123
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#8
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(Original post by Kerzen)
Be sure to check the spellings in your essay, especially of the writer's name.

PS Punctuation in places too.
Ok. Thanks!
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Kerzen
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#9
Which board are you doing?
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MissZ123
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#10
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(Original post by Kerzen)
Which board are you doing?
AQA
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Kerzen
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#11
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#11
(Original post by MissZ123)
AQA
Check out the GCSE Bitesize AQA page for English Literature - it includes 'An Inspector Calls'.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zxqncwx
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