GCSEstudyhello
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hi I am picking my Gcse options soon and have already chosen to do german as my primary language, would you say it is a good idea to do French as well? do you think doing two languages is necessary? and if it is what are the benefits of it in terms of how it affects my career, do you think I would benefit with my career more if I take French additionally or if I take computer science( in terms of how difficult they both are and in terms of what benefits come from both of them) thanks so much
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MindMax2000
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It depends on the career.

I did 2 languages for GCSE (3 if you include the one I did privately), and I can tell you it doesn't matter that much for career unless you are fluent in it i.e. native speaker level.

If you want to do a degree with/on a language, then you would need to do the language(s) at A Level. And for A Levels, you are most likely required to do the languages at GCSE.

Again, whether you should do computer science at GCSE will depend on the career you want to have. If you want to work in an IT related field, you could take it at GCSE. I don't think you would need it for A Level IT, but you should check on that. Most would be looking for graduates in IT related subjects.
In terms of getting a job in IT, I don't think you would even need a degree in it as much as the experience and the know-how to do the job. e.g. If I want to become a Java developer, I just need to learn how to program in Java and be able to demonstrate it.
With some employers, they would want you to have a computer science degree (or similar) though.

Of course, if you want to get a language certificate in a language (see the following: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common...pecific_scales), then you might want the GCSE and A Levels as evidence of your capabilities. To me, they're also the cheapest ways to get recognition. Btw, A2 on the CEFR scale is the equivalent of a higher GCSE in the foreign language, B2 is A Level in the language, C1 is degree level for degrees in a foreign language (e.g. French at degree level in the UK, not French at degree level in France), whereas C2 is complete mastery/native speaker. If you're looking at comparison for UK English speakers, C1 is the equivalent of GCSE English Language and C2 is A Level in English Language.
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GCSEstudyhello
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
It depends on the career.

I did 2 languages for GCSE (3 if you include the one I did privately), and I can tell you it doesn't matter that much for career unless you are fluent in it i.e. native speaker level.

If you want to do a degree with/on a language, then you would need to do the language(s) at A Level. And for A Levels, you are most likely required to do the languages at GCSE.

Again, whether you should do computer science at GCSE will depend on the career you want to have. If you want to work in an IT related field, you could take it at GCSE. I don't think you would need it for A Level IT, but you should check on that. Most would be looking for graduates in IT related subjects.
In terms of getting a job in IT, I don't think you would even need a degree in it as much as the experience and the know-how to do the job. e.g. If I want to become a Java developer, I just need to learn how to program in Java and be able to demonstrate it.
With some employers, they would want you to have a computer science degree (or similar) though.

Of course, if you want to get a language certificate in a language (see the following: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common...pecific_scales), then you might want the GCSE and A Levels as evidence of your capabilities. To me, they're also the cheapest ways to get recognition. Btw, A2 on the CEFR scale is the equivalent of a higher GCSE in the foreign language, B2 is A Level in the language, C1 is degree level for degrees in a foreign language (e.g. French at degree level in the UK, not French at degree level in France), whereas C2 is complete mastery/native speaker. If you're looking at comparison for UK English speakers, C1 is the equivalent of GCSE English Language and C2 is A Level in English Language.
thank you so much, this was very helpful
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by GCSEstudyhello)
thank you so much, this was very helpful
Sorry, forgot to mention that there is a myriad of IT certifications that would probably be more relevant to the specific role outside of an IT related degree. e.g. Comptia, Oracle, Microsoft networking, etc. However, you should really check what the specific requirements are for the specific job you're looking at first.
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aiwiloistyping
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I do both French and Computer Science - I'd say they are both equally as hard but still very enjoyable.
French is a very good subject in general. If you take it with German too you'll show that you are a very good learner because it takes a lot of skill to learn a language well, let alone two. Computer Science however requires more 'logical' thinking. It's also a very good choice because nowadays technology is advancing very quickly and to do well in it problem solving and critical thinking is essential.
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absolutelysprout
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i did french and computer science, found them both hard but manageable. take subjects you enjoy- what really matters at gcse is the grades you achieve and you're more likely to achieve decent grades if you are interested in your subjects :yep:
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