What are the LNAT’s like and what preparations can you do ahead for law?

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Hailey629
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Hi I was wondering what are the lnats like what do you get asked and is it based on law or just general knowledge overall for example like maths, English, science? Also what ways can you make yourself more familiar with law and what are things that you could start remembering and getting familiar with which may be useful for law on university?
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ItsJcesar
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The LNAT is a aptitude test. Therefore, you cannot study it, but you can practice it to make yourself more ready for the test.

To explain further, it’s a test on your cognitive reasoning and understanding skills, set out in mini essays in the test. Your given 42 multiple choice questions and have 90 minutes to complete the test.

In regards to studying it, the LNAT website states that you shouldn’t pay for programs as there is no “real way” to study for the test.

However, the ‘arbitio’ website has been regarded as a very useful website to help practice for the exam. That being said, it cost about £30 if I’m not mistaken. Anything I mentioned about the LNAT can be found on their website in more detail. So I suggest you look at the website as everything you need to know if on there. https://lnat.ac.uk
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mma_jd
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I'll give you my experience.

I actually found the LNAT to be quite enjoyable. Well, almost enjoyable, lets say. It's honestly not that bad and there's quite a few interesting passages you're going to be given. Your task is usually to understand exactly what the writer is trying to say with the passage. This may be hard for some people and easier for others, and it's not really something you can prepare for in just a few weeks or even a few months (LNAT themselves state that this is not a test you can revise for). I did practically no revision and scored above the cohort average for this year. The only form of 'preparation' you can really do is practice tests on the LNAT website.

In essence, the test is there to test your aptitude for a law degree. There's obviously a lot of reading involved in law, and therefore some of the most competitive universities have chosen to use this test as a way to filter out unsuitable candidates. If Law is the right degree for you, then you'll probably do quite well in this test. If you take the test and end up getting a poor score, it's likely that Law might not be the degree for you, given that you'll be expected to do a lot of complicated reading (which you'll have to understand) throughout your degree.
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ItsJcesar
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(Original post by mma_jd)
I'll give you my experience.

I actually found the LNAT to be quite enjoyable. Well, almost enjoyable, lets say. It's honestly not that bad and there's quite a few interesting passages you're going to be given. Your task is usually to understand exactly what the writer is trying to say with the passage. This may be hard for some people and easier for others, and it's not really something you can prepare for in just a few weeks or even a few months (LNAT themselves state that this is not a test you can revise for). I did practically no revision and scored above the cohort average for this year. The only form of 'preparation' you can really do is practice tests on the LNAT website.

In essence, the test is there to test your aptitude for a law degree. There's obviously a lot of reading involved in law, and therefore some of the most competitive universities have chosen to use this test as a way to filter out unsuitable candidates. If Law is the right degree for you, then you'll probably do quite well in this test. If you take the test and end up getting a poor score, it's likely that Law might not be the degree for you, given that you'll be expected to do a lot of complicated reading (which you'll have to understand) throughout your degree.
Getting a poor score on the LNAT does not mean a law degree is the incorrect choice.

LNAT is only accepted a few universities within the country. And there are countless universities that offer law degrees but do not require the LNAT. So your statement is lacking in substance tbh.
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mma_jd
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(Original post by ItsJcesar)
Getting a poor score on the LNAT does not mean a law degree is the incorrect choice.

LNAT is only accepted a few universities within the country. And there are countless universities that offer law degrees but do not require the LNAT. So your statement is lacking in substance tbh.
Well, I mean... the universities which do "accept" it are literally the top universities in the country. So the fact that the most competitive universities which everyone wants to get into REQUIRE (not just accept!) it clearly demonstrates that the skills required to do well in the test are important for a law degree.
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Hailey629
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I understand thanks everyone for your help and info and I get what both of you are saying as top universities do usually want the lnat like Cambridge if anyone else has anything else to say please do like their own experience. Thanks everyone!
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ItsJcesar
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(Original post by Hailey629)
I understand thanks everyone for your help and info and I get what both of you are saying as top universities do usually want the lnat like Cambridge if anyone else has anything else to say please do like their own experience. Thanks everyone!
Cambridge do no require the LNAT. Successful applicants are invited to an interview, and on the interview day, you will sit the CLT, which stands for Cambridge Law Test. It's similar to the LNAT. However, the CLT is actually about law, therefore some prior knowledge of the subject would be an advantage. Whereas the LNAT is not law based questions but rather the "understanding and reasoning" on questions
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Hailey629
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Oh sorry she had said top universities I thought I had seen the lnat on their website guess not but thank you for that information as I do want to get into cambridge
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ItsJcesar
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(Original post by Hailey629)
Oh sorry she had said top universities I thought I had seen the lnat on their website guess not but thank you for that information as I do want to get into cambridge
You welcome. Just a reminder that Oxford require the LNAT but Cambridge don’t. hope this helps
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Mikos
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(Original post by ItsJcesar)
Cambridge do no require the LNAT. Successful applicants are invited to an interview, and on the interview day, you will sit the CLT, which stands for Cambridge Law Test. It's similar to the LNAT. However, the CLT is actually about law, therefore some prior knowledge of the subject would be an advantage. Whereas the LNAT is not law based questions but rather the "understanding and reasoning" on questions
I kind of disagree. I got into Cambridge (and therefore sat the CLT). You don't really need legal knowledge, and they're quite different tests i.e whilst both have an argumentative essay, but the CLT doesn't have a multiple choice section which is a huge aspect of the LNAT ofc.

You're definitely right to say that Cambridge don't ask for an LNAT, though.
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ItsJcesar
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(Original post by Mikos)
I kind of disagree. I got into Cambridge (and therefore sat the CLT). You don't really need legal knowledge, and they're quite different tests i.e whilst both have an argumentative essay, but the CLT doesn't have a multiple choice section which is a huge aspect of the LNAT ofc.

You're definitely right to say that Cambridge don't ask for an LNAT, though.
I can agree. Your first hand experience would provide more knowledge than mine. From my understanding, they are indeed two very separate tests.
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Hailey629
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(Original post by Mikos)
I kind of disagree. I got into Cambridge (and therefore sat the CLT). You don't really need legal knowledge, and they're quite different tests i.e whilst both have an argumentative essay, but the CLT doesn't have a multiple choice section which is a huge aspect of the LNAT ofc.

You're definitely right to say that Cambridge don't ask for an LNAT, though.
Hi what did/are you studying in Cambridge I’m a mining Cambridge and working very hard what were you a level grades as well if you don’t mind saying.
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Hailey629
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Thank you to everyone though as all your opinions and ways the lnats and Clt help give me more knowledge as I was a bit unsure for what to expect in the future.
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Mikos
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(Original post by ItsJcesar)
I can agree. Your first hand experience would provide more knowledge than mine. From my understanding, they are indeed two very separate tests.
Yeah for sure, though tbf the LNAT essay section and the CLT do have similarities in fairness so you weren't entirely incorrect

(Original post by Hailey629)
Hi what did/are you studying in Cambridge I’m a mining Cambridge and working very hard what were you a level grades as well if you don’t mind saying.
My offer is for law, my A-level grades (I took the October exams) were A*AA.
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Hailey629
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I know that the entry requirement for law was A*AA and I want to also study law but didn’t think cambridge would accept people with A*AA as their must be people with A*A*A* but I’m very happy for you I hope I can’t get into cambridge one day what a levels did you do
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Mikos
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(Original post by Hailey629)
I know that the entry requirement for law was A*AA and I want to also study law but didn’t think cambridge would accept people with A*AA as their must be people with A*A*A* but I’m very happy for you I hope I can’t get into cambridge one day what a levels did you do
Well A*AA is the entry requirement lol, and they have to take predicted grades with a pinch of salt anyway. I did history, biology and English literature
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Hailey629
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Yeah I had just thought that even if I got A*AA they would mainly want the people with top grades like all A* I want to study in sixth form politics, sociology and English either combined or literature many sixth forms that offer this combination do combined so I think I will take the combined English would you say this is a good combination?
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npic9
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If you score low on the LNAT it doesn’t mean your not suitable for law so don’t worry about that, you can still get into a good law school ( eg LSE, Warwick, Leeds & etc ).

If you want practise the LNAT website provides a practise exam in which you’re timed, so maybe give that a shot.
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fadereacts
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If you want to do well in the lnat, the most effective way is to get Arbitio. Yes, it is expensive, but it almost guarantees you a good grade if you stick to the course. You will get lower scores in the arbitio tests as they are designed to be harder than the real lnat.
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Hailey629
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Okay thanks everyone I will check out the past papers and arbitio as well
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