Applying for Economics in good universities with bad gcse grades due to corona

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randomhuman123
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I want to apply for really good unis like KCL, UCL, St Andrews, LSE(MY UNI OF CHOICE) or Cambridge/Oxford. I was of school in year 10 cos of suregry for about 6/7 months and then performed not well in my GCSE mocks. I got them in 2020 and my teachers we very unfair with my grades. I didn't bother retaking my GCSEs so I got
8-Geography
7- Maths and RS
6- all triple sciences and English lang/lit
5- economics.
I'm trying to get A/a* in my A levels and i do a lot of volunteering and am trying to get work experience in a bank.
Do you think I would get a place in any good unis and is there any other way to back my application e.g which extra circular activities and just anything extra?
Also do the grades you get in the end of yr 12 matter and if i dont get into summer schools will it be ok?
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ItsJcesar
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Firstly, it would be great to know your predicted A level grades prior to giving you advice. Secondly, universities state in their course information what GCSE requirements are needed for the course. Some universities do not rely heavily on GCSE results, while others do. That being said, if you perform excellently in your A levels, achieving A* A* A, then this would be sufficient to secure a place at any top university. However, the top universities you mentioned DO require you to achieve these pre-requisite results in GCSE’s.

In regards to your injury/surgery, your able to fill out a form on your UCAS application when applying to universities for a ‘extenuating circumstances’. This form allows you to explain in detail of your circumstances that you deemed have hindered your Academic performance at any stage. However, not anyone can fill out this form. Individuals like yourself, who have suffered injury or mental health problems can fill out this form.

With that being said, even filling out an extenuating circumstances form would not guarantee that the top universities would overlook your GCSE results. That’s why it’s best to leave perform excellently in your A levels. I hope this helps.
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randomhuman123
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(Original post by ItsJcesar)
Firstly, it would be great to know your predicted A level grades prior to giving you advice. Secondly, universities state in their course information what GCSE requirements are needed for the course. Some universities do not rely heavily on GCSE results, while others do. That being said, if you perform excellently in your A levels, achieving A* A* A, then this would be sufficient to secure a place at any top university. However, the top universities you mentioned DO require you to achieve these pre-requisite results in GCSE’s.

In regards to your injury/surgery, your able to fill out a form on your UCAS application when applying to universities for a ‘extenuating circumstances’. This form allows you to explain in detail of your circumstances that you deemed have hindered your Academic performance at any stage. However, not anyone can fill out this form. Individuals like yourself, who have suffered injury or mental health problems can fill out this form.

With that being said, even filling out an extenuating circumstances form would not guarantee that the top universities would overlook your GCSE results. That’s why it’s best to leave perform excellently in your A levels. I hope this helps.
Thank you so so much for this repsonse it really relived my anxiety and also I have thought of an economics and finance degree? what are the opinons on the degree and everything.
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BenRyan99
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As long as you take maths and further maths a-level plus another subject and get at least A*A*A or A*AA then you stand a chance. Oxbridge tend to look closely at GCSE grades so would've thought it'd be unlikely to receive an offer from there. LSE and UCL don't really look at GCSEs but just require high grades is maths and FM. Kings and St Andrews are much more lenient
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by randomhuman123)
Thank you so so much for this repsonse it really relived my anxiety and also I have thought of an economics and finance degree? what are the opinons on the degree and everything.
It's a fun degree in my experience, but the knowledge has practical limitations.

Although the stuff you learn in the finance sections of the degree are what they perscribe in professional qualifications, it's not strictly accepted for jobs. To get a finance job, you will go for the professional qualification instead of getting a finance degree. Unless you intend to go into research, the finance part of the degree has little use other than being another degree you can apply to jobs that asks for any degree.

The economics part of the degree will allow you to become an economist or go into economics research, which can be said to be more or less the same job. You can also apply for jobs that asks for any degree from any subject.

The overall degree is very theoretical, and it doesn't have that many practical elements. You do get to learn a few things about stats, which can be useful for investments and knowing about stats, but it might not be enough for some stats related jobs.
What I find valuable in the degree is the thinking and reasoning skills you pick up for business applications. I consider economics to be the science part of business/management, and can help determine what and how a business should decide on issues. In practice, the economics aren't always considered, if at all.
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randomhuman123
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
It's a fun degree in my experience, but the knowledge has practical limitations.

Although the stuff you learn in the finance sections of the degree are what they perscribe in professional qualifications, it's not strictly accepted for jobs. To get a finance job, you will go for the professional qualification instead of getting a finance degree. Unless you intend to go into research, the finance part of the degree has little use other than being another degree you can apply to jobs that asks for any degree.

The economics part of the degree will allow you to become an economist or go into economics research, which can be said to be more or less the same job. You can also apply for jobs that asks for any degree from any subject.

The overall degree is very theoretical, and it doesn't have that many practical elements. You do get to learn a few things about stats, which can be useful for investments and knowing about stats, but it might not be enough for some stats related jobs.
What I find valuable in the degree is the thinking and reasoning skills you pick up for business applications. I consider economics to be the science part of business/management, and can help determine what and how a business should decide on issues. In practice, the economics aren't always considered, if at all.
Ahhhh thank you but I have finally decided to go into either pure finance for accounting and finance? any help or tips i could get for my personal statement
i only have work experience and a lot of volunteering
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by randomhuman123)
Ahhhh thank you but I have finally decided to go into either pure finance for accounting and finance? any help or tips i could get for my personal statement
i only have work experience and a lot of volunteering
Not particularly. I think I more or less winged it for mine.
Again, I don't think most employers will have a preferrence on finance/accounting graduates over graduates of other degrees. Bear that in mind when applying for grad jobs.

When I wrote my personal statement, I think I mentioned stuff on understanding the stock market, the way the financial industry works, and understanding the complexities of how the financial system meshes together. In hindsight, I should have mentioned specific things that would have boosted my personal statement e.g. reading some of the books everyone reads (e.g. A random walk down wall street by Malkiel), mention that I read the financial times and keep up with business related news on BBC, put together a mock stock portfolio, participated in a stock market trading game. For accounting, you could read up AccountingWeb (which is free), or try to pick up the IFRS handbook on accounting treatments, or you have picked up a book on bookkeeping by the AAT to learn more about bookkeeping, or you have looked into accounting software and played around with the bookkeeping to understand how things are put together (unfrotunately most of the extracurricular stuff for accounting is pretty dry). It will help if you could specify whether you're more into financial accounting or management accounting, as this will also highlight what you would likely want to get into.
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randomhuman123
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Not particularly. I think I more or less winged it for mine.
Again, I don't think most employers will have a preferrence on finance/accounting graduates over graduates of other degrees. Bear that in mind when applying for grad jobs.

When I wrote my personal statement, I think I mentioned stuff on understanding the stock market, the way the financial industry works, and understanding the complexities of how the financial system meshes together. In hindsight, I should have mentioned specific things that would have boosted my personal statement e.g. reading some of the books everyone reads (e.g. A random walk down wall street by Malkiel), mention that I read the financial times and keep up with business related news on BBC, put together a mock stock portfolio, participated in a stock market trading game. For accounting, you could read up AccountingWeb (which is free), or try to pick up the IFRS handbook on accounting treatments, or you have picked up a book on bookkeeping by the AAT to learn more about bookkeeping, or you have looked into accounting software and played around with the bookkeeping to understand how things are put together (unfrotunately most of the extracurricular stuff for accounting is pretty dry). It will help if you could specify whether you're more into financial accounting or management accounting, as this will also highlight what you would likely want to get into.
heyy thank you so much. i dont know what aspect but i enjoy the financial market more and aiming to land job there through this degree. also im more focused on the financial side than the accounting. sceondly i have work experience with henley business school for a fca role and with hsbc giving more insight in the financial market. is it possible you coyld share your ps with me please that would be amazing and also what unis did u applyy to with what grades and what uni did you get into/ go to. also ive read that reading for this degree isnt very necessary or you dont really need it. is that true?
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by randomhuman123)
heyy thank you so much. i dont know what aspect but i enjoy the financial market more and aiming to land job there through this degree. also im more focused on the financial side than the accounting. sceondly i have work experience with henley business school for a fca role and with hsbc giving more insight in the financial market. is it possible you coyld share your ps with me please that would be amazing and also what unis did u applyy to with what grades and what uni did you get into/ go to. also ive read that reading for this degree isnt very necessary or you dont really need it. is that true?
I don't have my PS with me anymore, since it was a while ago.
I'd rather keep the unis and grades thing confidential if that's OK with you. Put it this way, they weren't spectacualr, which is what you need to get into finance.

As mentioned earlier, you don't need a finance degree to get into finance. An appropriate qualification in the finance industry will do you more good than a degree. Infact, a random degree from a targeted top end uni will do you more good than a finance degree at a nontargeted uni. It doesn't mean you won't get into finance from a nontargeted uni, but it will be that much harder for a number of reasons.

Any work experience you can get your hands on will do wonders, but you should make sure it's related to your role of choice e.g. getting a job as a bank teller won't help much if you intend to work in quants.
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