I dont tip at restaurants or to drivers, why is considered so rude? makes no sense

Watch
jumbojim56877
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
I would genuinely say that I am a very nice and caring person before anyone comes for me and more so than the general population but one thing I don't understand is why is it considered so rude not to tip? surely its their job and low pay is so sad and disgusting but its not my job to pay extra especially when I cant afford much. If I was rich i would definitely tip them. People then would reply saying if you cant afford to tip don't eat out which doesn't make sense to me. I want to eat. I do feel bad beacausde it is considered to be rude but why is the anger and pressure being directed onto us buyers. It should be towards the companies underpaying workers. What do you think and whts your age ? (I have realised older people have the view its rude not to tip but i wonder if its different in the younger generation)
0
reply
Bryan2222
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
I’m 18, I very rarely tip and if I do it’s for rounding up convenience. At the end of the day they know what wage they signed up for and shouldn’t guilt trip paying customers into giving them extra money for doing a service they are required to do.
1
reply
DiddyDec
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
Tipping isn't really part of British culture. I do tip but only because I have the means to do so now, I never used to.
0
reply
jumbojim56877
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by Bryan2222)
I’m 18, I very rarely tip and if I do it’s for rounding up convenience. At the end of the day they know what wage they signed up for and shouldn’t guilt trip paying customers into giving them extra money for doing a service they are required to do.
yeah exactly
0
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 week ago
#5
It annoys me when I’m back in the uk. Where I live now you don’t tip at all, and it’s so nice and easy.

If business can’t pay their staff just bump the prices up in general rather than randomly asking people to give what ever they feel like at the end.

It also seems to be really awkward sometimes at the end of a meal if your splitting with people who tip more or less than you.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
I'm middle aged and I always tip unless the service was poor. Not just restaurants, but taxis and hairdressers too. It's just a cultural way of saying thanks but I think it's dying out as younger people don't seem to do it as much it seems whereas I was bought up that way. But I don't feel any embarrassment over not tipping if I didn't like the service, unlike when I went to New York where it seemed very much expected.

It isn't awkward in a group to tip in a restaurant, we all just round up our meal approximately 10% or just over.
1
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by harrysbar)
I'm middle aged and I always tip unless the service was poor. Not just restaurants, but taxis and hairdressers too. It's just a cultural way of saying thanks but I think it's dying out as younger people don't seem to do it as much it seems whereas I was bought up that way. But I don't feel any embarrassment over not tipping if I didn't like the service, unlike when I went to New York where it seemed very much expected.

It isn't awkward in a group to tip in a restaurant, we all just round up our meal approximately 10% or just over.
That’s fine if you all agree.. I’ve had friends who are dead against tipping and won’t contribute at all, and then some in my family go way overboard and will want to tip 10-20% which puts a lot of pressure on other member who aren’t as well off. Etc.

it’s not exactly a bit problem, but just another little annoyance. I agree with you that it’s nice to have a culture that says thanks. But even then we don’t say thanks fairly.. who tips their supermarket worker or cleaner for example.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
That’s fine if you all agree.. I’ve had friends who are dead against tipping and won’t contribute at all, and then some in my family go way overboard and will want to tip 10-20% which puts a lot of pressure on other member who aren’t as well off. Etc.

it’s not exactly a bit problem, but just another little annoyance. I agree with you that it’s nice to have a culture that says thanks. But even then we don’t say thanks fairly.. who tips their supermarket worker or cleaner for example.
I actually did tip my cleaner in a way when I had one years ago, in the form of a financial gift at Christmas. Not supermarket workers no, that doesn't happen - same with my job in a school, no one expects it.

It can cause slight awkwardness in groups I agree - fine with most people as you all just put in a bit extra and the ones who can't afford it just round it up slightly or say they can't afford to pay extra and that's ok. But it can cause irritation when eating out with people who easily can afford it but start getting the calculator out to work out exactly what they spent and not a penny more.
1
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 week ago
#9
(Original post by harrysbar)
I actually did tip my cleaner in a way when I had one years ago, in the form of a financial gift at Christmas. Not supermarket workers no, that doesn't happen - same with my job in a school, no one expects it.

It can cause slight awkwardness in groups I agree - fine with most people as you all just put in a bit extra and the ones who can't afford it just round it up slightly or say they can't afford to pay extra and that's ok. But it can cause irritation when eating out with people who easily can afford it but start getting the calculator out to work out exactly what they spent and not a penny more.
Don’t get me started on people that give that much of a **** that they break out calculators after a meal.. I don’t have any time for that, especially with a bit of wine and a lot of food in me!

Christmas tips are great though, and your right they do often reach people who aren’t normally tipped. Bin men, paper boys, cleaners, gardeners etc. Great tradition
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
Don’t get me started on people that give that much of a **** that they break out calculators after a meal.. I don’t have any time for that, especially with a bit of wine and a lot of food in me!

Christmas tips are great though, and your right they do often reach people who aren’t normally tipped. Bin men, paper boys, cleaners, gardeners etc. Great tradition
Yeah I agree Christmas tips are nice way to say thanks to people who have been great all year.

The worst are the ones who say "Well I will only pay the exact price of my meal as I don't drink alcohol" - conveniently forgetting they had a fancy spritzer thing that cost almost as much as a glass of house wine. They always act shocked at how much their share goes up when you remind them to add in the cost of their soft drinks.

And don't get me started on the ones with money who still only drink tap water in restaurants :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 week ago
#11
I mean, it makes sense right? Give them a financial incentive to do a good job, over and above being shouted at by a manager or something? It also means that richer people can effectively subsidise poorer people, which is nice.

As long as they are getting a stable wage too of course. In some states in the US where they only get tips is just crazy.
1
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 week ago
#12
(Original post by nexttime)
As long as they are getting a stable wage too of course. In some states in the US where they only get tips is just crazy.
yes I agree - the US system is screwed up but as long as it feels entirely voluntary, tipping is win win
0
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
I don’t think it’s that difficult; just go according to the tipping norms of the country. If you’re in the UK, there’s no need to add a tip of your own accord (unless you really want to). In the US, just factor a 10-20% tip into the price (like you would have to do with tax in a shop anyway).

I agree that the tipping culture in the US is a bit more inconvenient than it needs to be, but the point of payment isn’t really the time to have a big ideological debate about it. Ultimately the waiter is expecting to be paid a tip for his services, and you know that perfectly well before sitting down to eat, so even if it’s not legally enforceable it’s bad form not to do it.

Think of it like the “12.5% discretionary service charge” that restaurants in the UK often add to the bill. You could ask them to remove it if you really wanted to be an ass about it, but you wouldn’t (except in serious cases of poor service), because they’ve made it clear that they’re expecting it as part of the total cost. The difference in the US is that people already know this without it needing to be written on the bill.
Last edited by tazarooni89; 1 week ago
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 week ago
#14
(Original post by tazarooni89)
I don’t think it’s that difficult; just go according to the tipping norms of the country. If you’re in the UK, there’s no need to add a tip of your own accord (unless you really want to). In the US, just factor a 10-20% tip into the price (like you would have to do with tax in a shop anyway).

I agree that the tipping culture in the US is a bit more inconvenient than it needs to be, but the point of payment isn’t really the time to have a big ideological debate about it. Ultimately the waiter is expecting to be paid a tip for his services, and you know that perfectly well before sitting down to eat, so even if it’s not legally enforceable it’s bad form not to do it.
But what if the service is bad in the US? How can you show your displeasure with the way they are doing their job apart from by not tipping? But I've heard of people from the UK getting into arguments with US waiters for not tipping as it seems like it's a hostile act
0
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 week ago
#15
(Original post by harrysbar)
But what if the service is bad in the US? How can you show your displeasure with the way they are doing their job apart from by not tipping? But I've heard of people from the UK getting into arguments with US waiters for not tipping as it seems like it's a hostile act
Well yes, not tipping is considered a hostile act, because it's usually reserved for when the service is absolutely atrocious, e.g. when you've made complaints about something several times and they don't bother taking any notice. You'd reserve that for situations where the equivalent in the UK would be to ask them to remove the discretionary service charge from the bill.

Otherwise I believe the general rule of thumb is 10% tip if the service was bad, 15% if it was acceptable and 20% if it was good.
Last edited by tazarooni89; 1 week ago
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 week ago
#16
It just wouldn’t sit right with me to tip 10% for bad service 🤷🏼*♀️
0
reply
SHallowvale
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 week ago
#17
I'm pretty much against tipping of any kind, especially in restaurants. I don't see any reason why I should tip waiter staff since all they do is take an order and delivery food.
0
reply
Joleee
Badges: 19
#18
Report 1 week ago
#18
i used to be a server overseas where tipping is expected and you have to give a certain percentage of the total bill to the kitchen; so let's say the bill for your table is $20 and the tip out rate is 5 percent. you as a server would have to give the kitchen $1.00 regardless it the table tipped you or not, so literally costing you money. don't know if it's the same system in the UK but if i had a life and went to a restaurant/bar i would tip with that knowledge. i also have great respect for servers as it's soul-sucking work as you're not only there to take orders and deliver food, but to make sure your guests are having a great night and entertain them while you're running around with your head cut off, the kitchen and the bar is in chaos and you get the blame for it and must deeply apologise to your guests for all of it cuz now your guests aren't having a good time, oh and put up with drunk people hitting on you. personally never met a server who genuinely enjoyed their job outside the social aspect with their colleagues.

if you'd rather servers earned a fair wage and there was no actual tipping, you as a customer are going to end up paying for it in the price of your bill anyway as the restaurant/bar will just hike up the cost of your food and drink. that's how they do it in Australia.
Last edited by Joleee; 1 week ago
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 week ago
#19
(Original post by Joleee)
i used to be a server overseas where tipping is expected and you have to give a certain percentage of the total bill to the kitchen; so let's say the bill for your table is $20 and the tip out rate is 5 percent. you as a server would have to give the kitchen $1.00 regardless it the table tipped you or not, so literally costing you money. don't know if it's the same system in the UK but if i had a life and went to a restaurant/bar i would tip with that knowledge. i also have great respect for servers as it's soul-sucking work as you're not only there to take orders and deliver food, but to make sure your guests are having a great night and entertain them while you're running around with your head cut off, the kitchen and the bar is in chaos and you get the blame for it and must deeply apologise to your guests for all of it cuz now your guests aren't having a good time, oh and put up with drunk people hitting on you. personally never met a server who genuinely enjoyed their job outside the social aspect with their colleagues.

if you'd rather servers earned a fair wage and there was no actual tipping, you as a customer are going to end up paying for it in the price of your bill anyway as the restaurant/bar will just hike up the cost of your food and drink. that's how they do it in Australia.
That’s strange, my Dad lives in Australia half the year and he always comments how exceptionally cheap eating out is there compared to London
0
reply
tazarooni89
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 week ago
#20
(Original post by harrysbar)
It just wouldn’t sit right with me to tip 10% for bad service 🤷🏼*♀️
So then all you have to do is this: If the bill comes to $10, just add 15% onto it to make it $11.50, and pretend that's how much your bill actually came to, because that's how much that's expected by default. The extra $1.50 is the same as the "discretionary service charge" added onto a bill in the UK.

Then if the service was particularly good, you can tip extra if you want to. If the service was particularly bad, you might consider removing some or all of the service charge (depending on exactly how bad).
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling being back in school?

Happy (43)
23.37%
Unhappy (52)
28.26%
Conflicted (89)
48.37%

Watched Threads

View All