Fedecrim
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Hey guys, I have an offer to studying Accounting and Finance at King’s College London. If someone who is doing this course could please tell me their experience, that’d be great. I know it’s a new course, and so there isn’t that much info on it online. Please let me know if you like it, the types of opportunities/masters you have after this course (cus it seems like quite a specific course?), and anything else.

I am just worried that by doing an Accounting and Finance degree at King’s, it’d be hard to do a masters such as Econ/ Econ and Finance, as Accounting and Finance seems quite closed...
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MindMax2000
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I've done an accounting related undergrad, and then I did economics and finance related postgrads, althought not at King's

The course can be great if you intend to go into accountancy, but there are cheaper and faster ways to get qualified. The sort of master's you can do is limited to either accounting, finance, and management to my knowledge (there might be other postgrads that won't require any subject specific degrees at undergrad, but I haven't checked). I don't see the point in doing a master's in accounting though, because you're mor or less covering the same material in the undergrad and you won't get any more exemptions for your professional accounting qualification. I'm also not keen to say you should do finance as a master's because similarly it will cover similar content as the undergrad, and you won't need it to go into the finance sector, where they have a myriad of Level 3 qualifications to get into a lot of finance related jobs (most of which have little to no entry requirements). The only qualification that I know of that would require a degree of some sort is the CFA, but even then you can get around that by doing the IMC that doesn't require an entry requirements.

Whether you will enjoy accounting and finance will depend on your personality. Personally, if it doesn't have quantitative calculations, and is more perscriptive and more rules based like a law subject, I would hate it. So I ended up liking the management accounting, stats, economics, and finance modules a lot more than the financial accounting. I didn't do any law modules, because you would understand I would avoid them like crazy. Having done accounting modules outside of uni, I can say I'd avoid audit like the plague as well.

In order to do some master's in economics, you will need to do a conversion course (PGDip) after your bachelor's in accounting and finance, because you won't have enough accounting knowledge in your undergrad to do a master's in economics. If your undergrad was in economics and accounting or economics and finance, then you should be able to do the master's in economics or economics and finance. Most top universities don't usually offer this option at undergrad though.

My question to you is why are you choosing to do these set of degreees? If you intend to go into research, then the economics undergrad is more than sufficient. If you intend to go into accounting, you might want to decide on the professional body, and choose modules that are more aligned with the body (although it will be cheaper and possibly quicker if you go straight for the qualification instead). You can also go into accounting research after you have done your accounting qualification.
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Fedecrim
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Thanks! That’s so helpful, honestly. I am not 100% sure, still what exactly I want to do. I know I love finance, economics and accounting. I am not particularly interested in going into THAT much research, if that makes sense, but a master’s of a year would be nice, to gain a bit more knowledge in something slightly different. What are these conversion courses? Who offers them, and do you know how long they are?
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Fedecrim)
Thanks! That’s so helpful, honestly. I am not 100% sure, still what exactly I want to do. I know I love finance, economics and accounting. I am not particularly interested in going into THAT much research, if that makes sense, but a master’s of a year would be nice, to gain a bit more knowledge in something slightly different. What are these conversion courses? Who offers them, and do you know how long they are?
Conversion courses are 1 year courses/degrees that demonstrate you are able to do the subject at a higher level. Content-wise they're the equivalent of half of a bachelor's, and you will be studying alongside of those who are doing their bachelor's. It should make sense to spend no longer than 1 year since a master's is a 1 year course.

I did mine at the university I did my undergrad, but they tend to be commonplace. There are 8 places mentioned in the following link:
https://www.postgraduatesearch.com/p...fication=pgdip
.
Do bear in mind that whatever you learn in your conversion course, you are more than likely to repeat again in your master's, which is a little silly in grand scheme of things. This is because a master's is like an accelerated half of a bachelor's degree + a little more above year 3 of a bachelor's with a master's dissertation. At some universities, the only difference between a PGDip and a MSc is that the MSc has a master's dissertation. However, a PGDip is regarded as a Level 7 qualification, the same level as MSc, both of which are still higher than a bachelor's.

You can do some MA courses without having a prior background in economics, but I don't know how relevant they are to what you want. Generally, the MSc and MRes (or MEcon, depending on how the universities decide to abbreviate them) are the better degrees for research, and generally require the PGDip if you don't have the background.
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Fedecrim
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That’s honestly so helpful. I’m glad there’s so many choices for me to make, to make the most of my chances of getting a good job. That’s great, thanks!
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