MDchalametobrien
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what is the difference between psychology bsc or Ma coz im more interested in Ma due to my A-level subjects but im not sure if i would be able to get a job in psychology if i go with Ma. Also some uni's have the Ma option on there website but not on the USCAS why is this? thank you
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ellie997
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MA as Master of Arts - so postgrad?
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by MDchalametobrien)
what is the difference between psychology bsc or Ma coz im more interested in Ma due to my A-level subjects but im not sure if i would be able to get a job in psychology if i go with Ma. Also some uni's have the Ma option on there website but not on the USCAS why is this? thank you
As above, the BSc is an undergraduate courses which you can apply for via UCAS.

The MA is a postgraduate course, undertaken after completing an undergraduate degree. You apply for Masters courses directly via the university rather than UCAS.
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by MDchalametobrien)
what is the difference between psychology bsc or Ma coz im more interested in Ma due to my A-level subjects but im not sure if i would be able to get a job in psychology if i go with Ma. Also some uni's have the Ma option on there website but not on the USCAS why is this? thank you
Hey hey MDchalametobrien Can I ask where you've seen the MA degrees? The only reason I ask is because I know some of the older universities in Scotland do have undergraduate degrees which are classed as an MA (for example, Glasgow). They're still 4 year undergraduate degree programmes, and are the same level of qualification as a BSc. So essentially, if you undertake the MA Psychology at Glasgow, you will have the equivalent Honours degree qualification.

Here's a quote from the University of Glasgow's website:
At Glasgow (and the other three ancient universities in Scotland), an Honours level degree in the Arts is called a Master of Arts (MA) and an Honours level degree in the Social Sciences a Master of Arts (Social Sciences). These should not be confused with the Master of Arts offered by some universities in England, which refers to a postgraduate qualification.

Sorry, this may not be relevant as you may not have been looking at those Scottish universities but thought I would mention it just in case you were! I know it can be confusing, and I'd say in the vast majority of occasions when you're looking at an MA it will be a Postgraduate course.

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
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MDchalametobrien
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(Original post by University of Strathclyde)
Hey hey MDchalametobrien Can I ask where you've seen the MA degrees? The only reason I ask is because I know some of the older universities in Scotland do have undergraduate degrees which are classed as an MA (for example, Glasgow). They're still 4 year undergraduate degree programmes, and are the same level of qualification as a BSc. So essentially, if you undertake the MA Psychology at Glasgow, you will have the equivalent Honours degree qualification.

Here's a quote from the University of Glasgow's website:
At Glasgow (and the other three ancient universities in Scotland), an Honours level degree in the Arts is called a Master of Arts (MA) and an Honours level degree in the Social Sciences a Master of Arts (Social Sciences). These should not be confused with the Master of Arts offered by some universities in England, which refers to a postgraduate qualification.

Sorry, this may not be relevant as you may not have been looking at those Scottish universities but thought I would mention it just in case you were! I know it can be confusing, and I'd say in the vast majority of occasions when you're looking at an MA it will be a Postgraduate course.

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
Hi yes, I was looking at Glasgow and Aberdeen so it was helpful. Thank you
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Arden University
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(Original post by MDchalametobrien)
what is the difference between psychology bsc or Ma coz im more interested in Ma due to my A-level subjects but im not sure if i would be able to get a job in psychology if i go with Ma. Also some uni's have the Ma option on there website but not on the USCAS why is this? thank you
MDchalametobrien
A BSc or BA is a typical Psychology degree (level 4,5,6), an MA or MSc is a post graduate (Level 7).

Ten years ago when I did my degree a lot of people carried on at the same University for their 4th year, however it is much more common to go to another University (I've been to three) which helps you to build up contacts within an industry - and I've got two jobs through doing this over the years.

Post graduate study is also a lot easier to do distance learning wise too if you have work/general life commitments. You might be interested in the degree and MSc programs at Arden University, there is a blended learning option in Manchester, Birmingham, and London but also ones completely online - here is a link https://arden.ac.uk/our-courses/subj...logy-sociology

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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JamesManc
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In Scotland courses are often MA instead of BA - it makes no difference, I'd go for the MA if I had the choice - it looks better.
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artful_lounger
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As above in Scotland the first degree from ancient universities is usually an MA, although they also offer BSc degrees in some subjects. The degree title (MA/BSc/BA/etc) is irrelevant compared to the course content however, so you should focus on what modules etc are actually available, rather than the title of the degree.
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bethanny_g
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
As above in Scotland the first degree from ancient universities is usually an MA, although they also offer BSc degrees in some subjects. The degree title (MA/BSc/BA/etc) is irrelevant compared to the course content however, so you should focus on what modules etc are actually available, rather than the title of the degree.
I know that's a bit off topic but do you know if getting MA from a higher ranked university (Aberdeen) is better than BSc from a lower ranked one (Abertay Dundee)? I'm thinking about masters in forensic psychology and I want to know if completing MA instead of BSc would affect my future prospects
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by bethanny_g)
I know that's a bit off topic but do you know if getting MA from a higher ranked university (Aberdeen) is better than BSc from a lower ranked one (Abertay Dundee)? I'm thinking about masters in forensic psychology and I want to know if completing MA instead of BSc would affect my future prospects
I doubt it, BSc vs MA (from a Scottish uni) is going to be seen as exactly the same. The difference will be the relative strength of each department (indepdently of the degree title) and probably more importantly what relevant work experience you have. I don't know as much about forensic psychology, but for example for clinical psychology in England you need to do a DClinPsy after your BPS accredited undergraduate degree, but the DClinPsy is extremely competitive with most applicants having years of work experiences, masters degrees and/or PhDs. Forensic psychology I would guess is probably similar, albeit with possibly a different qualification route?
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bethanny_g
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I doubt it, BSc vs MA (from a Scottish uni) is going to be seen as exactly the same. The difference will be the relative strength of each department (indepdently of the degree title) and probably more importantly what relevant work experience you have. I don't know as much about forensic psychology, but for example for clinical psychology in England you need to do a DClinPsy after your BPS accredited undergraduate degree, but the DClinPsy is extremely competitive with most applicants having years of work experiences, masters degrees and/or PhDs. Forensic psychology I would guess is probably similar, albeit with possibly a different qualification route?
thanks for the info
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I doubt it, BSc vs MA (from a Scottish uni) is going to be seen as exactly the same. The difference will be the relative strength of each department (indepdently of the degree title) and probably more importantly what relevant work experience you have. I don't know as much about forensic psychology, but for example for clinical psychology in England you need to do a DClinPsy after your BPS accredited undergraduate degree, but the DClinPsy is extremely competitive with most applicants having years of work experiences, masters degrees and/or PhDs. Forensic psychology I would guess is probably similar, albeit with possibly a different qualification route?
There's a few different routes to become a Forensic Psychologist but they all requires both the Stage 1 and Stage 2

1. MSc in Forensic Psychology (Stage 1), then the BPS Qualification in Forensic Psychology (Stage 2)
2. MSc in Forensic Psychology, then a Postgraduate Diploma in Forensic Psychology (only certain uni's offer this course)
3. Professional Doctorate in Forensic Psychology (ForenPsyD, both Stage 1 and 2 combined)

I'd argue that unlike the clinical doctorate, the aspect most people seem to struggle with is finding employment in a relevant forensic setting before applying for the Stage 2, rather than getting accepted onto the doctorate itself.

(Original post by bethanny_g)
I know that's a bit off topic but do you know if getting MA from a higher ranked university (Aberdeen) is better than BSc from a lower ranked one (Abertay Dundee)? I'm thinking about masters in forensic psychology and I want to know if completing MA instead of BSc would affect my future prospects
I'd check and see if holding an MA instead of a BSc will affect your eligibility for the postgraduate loan, otherwise you may have to fund the MSc yourself.
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bethanny_g
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
I'd check and see if holding an MA instead of a BSc will affect your eligibility for the postgraduate loan, otherwise you may have to fund the MSc yourself.
I'm not sure if that's what you mean but despite the title MA is an undergraduate degree in Scotland (it's like BA in England). My concern is if Forensic Psychology courses have a preference for Bachelor of Science psych degrees rather than Bachelor of Arts and whether or not BSc is "worth" more
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by bethanny_g)
I'm not sure if that's what you mean but despite the title MA is an undergraduate degree in Scotland (it's like BA in England). My concern is if Forensic Psychology courses have a preference for Bachelor of Science psych degrees rather than Bachelor of Arts and whether or not BSc is "worth" more
Oh okay, I thought the extra year of study gave you a Masters degree. Seems weird that anyone would choose an extra year of studying for the same end result, unless you're Scottish and don't pay tuition fees.

Like many things, preferences are university specific, but as long as the course is BPS accredited it won't matter if you do a BSc or MA.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
Oh okay, I thought the extra year of study gave you a Masters degree. Seems weird that anyone would choose an extra year of studying for the same end result, unless you're Scottish and don't pay tuition fees.

Like many things, preferences are university specific, but as long as the course is BPS accredited it won't matter if you do a BSc or MA.
I believe most Scottish unis have a fee arrangement for RUK students where they don't pay more than the equivalent amount they'd pay for a degree done in England (e.g. 3 years for an English BSc vs 4 for a Scottish BSc, both will pay a maximum of £27750 for tuition fees across the courses currently). Usually the Scottish degrees do this by having the final two years cost half the tuition fees. Also students with high A-level grades can apply for direct entry to second year for most Scottish degrees
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I believe most Scottish unis have a fee arrangement for RUK students where they don't pay more than the equivalent amount they'd pay for a degree done in England (e.g. 3 years for an English BSc vs 4 for a Scottish BSc, both will pay a maximum of £27750 for tuition fees across the courses currently). Usually the Scottish degrees do this by having the final two years cost half the tuition fees. Also students with high A-level grades can apply for direct entry to second year for most Scottish degrees
Oh, that's good! Every day is truly a school day
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