Race: White, Black, Irish Watch

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SamTheMan
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#1
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This post was inspired by a previous post in General chat about ethnicity. Why in questionnaires is Irish always an extra option for race? White European, Asian, Afro-Carribean and then Irish? I've noticed this so many times...
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technik
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cant say ive ever seen that.

majority of people in the republic of ireland, and northern ireland are white.
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an Siarach
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The only time ive ever noticed something like that is as part of a listing such as:

British - Scottish
British - English
British - Welsh
British - Irish

Ive definately never seen Irish as a choice alongside 'white' or anything like that.
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dogtanian
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I've not seen it on many forms, but I've seen things like
White - British
White - Irish
White - Other


Maybe it's forms where it's mostly people in Britain and Ireland filling it in, with the 'other' option there for the few, well, others...
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NDGAARONDI
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These race options make me laugh. There are only three races in the world, excluding mixed race. I am of the same race as Gerry Adams, Gadaffi and George W Bush.
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Howard
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(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
These race options make me laugh. There are only three races in the world, excluding mixed race. I am of the same race as Gerry Adams, Gadaffi and George W Bush.
That's right; mongoloid, caucasianoid, and negroid. Those are indeed the three proto-races.
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Catrionanism
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I've not seen it on many forms, but I've seen things like
White - British
White - Irish
White - Other
The above options are usually offered on forms that cover the whole of the UK. There are many people in Northern Ireland who would completely refuse to fill in any form that required them to declare they were British. Therefore, a form like that keeps everyone happy.
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technik
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(Original post by Catrionanism)
The above options are usually offered on forms that cover the whole of the UK. There are many people in Northern Ireland who would completely refuse to fill in any form that required them to declare they were British. Therefore, a form like that keeps everyone happy.
bet many of those people wont refuse the benefits though...
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Catrionanism
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bet many of those people wont refuse the benefits though...
I'm not sure what you mean by "the benefits"?
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frost105
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I've seen forms where if you have ticked Irish or your from Northern Ireland you have been asked to declare whether your protestant or catholic
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Catrionanism
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I've seen forms where if you have ticked Irish or your from Northern Ireland you have been asked to declare whether your protestant or catholic
Yes, that appeared on the census forms. They need an idea of the Protestant and Catholic percentages in N. Ireland so the Protestant newspapers can write "Aagh! They're catching up! Quick, start shooting them!" and the Catholic ones can write "Any day now! Shoot them to make our victory faster!"

What would life be without alarmist editorials?

Interestingly, if you refuse to disclose your religious background, they'll look at your name, your family's religion, etc and assign one to you anyway. So refusing to indicate your background because you see no point in institutionalising sectarianism doesn't work.
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frost105
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Well these forms were for Boots and Monsoon so dont know how that worked
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Catrionanism
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In that case it would be to ensure they're an Equal Opportunities employer, I should imagine.
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technik
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(Original post by frost105)
I've seen forms where if you have ticked Irish or your from Northern Ireland you have been asked to declare whether your protestant or catholic
all state schools and job applications require you to state your religion or religious background.
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technik
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(Original post by Catrionanism)
Yes, that appeared on the census forms. They need an idea of the Protestant and Catholic percentages in N. Ireland so the Protestant newspapers can write "Aagh! They're catching up! Quick, start shooting them!" and the Catholic ones can write "Any day now! Shoot them to make our victory faster!"

What would life be without alarmist editorials?

Interestingly, if you refuse to disclose your religious background, they'll look at your name, your family's religion, etc and assign one to you anyway. So refusing to indicate your background because you see no point in institutionalising sectarianism doesn't work.
the catholics have a bit to go yet
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yawn
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(Original post by technik)
the mics have a bit to go yet

I'm surprised that there are so many Catholics in Northern Ireland - the numbers overwhelm any other Christian sect.

It is disappointing that not many Irish people in Northern Ireland can speak Irish - I wonder how the percentage compares with the percentage of Welsh speaking people in Wales?
yawn
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(Original post by technik)
all state schools and job applications require you to state your religion or religious background.
Why is that - are quotas in place? I have heard that Catholics were not given jobs when there was a Protestant without one - particularly at Harland & Wolfe - in the dark, not so distant, past.
hitchhiker_13
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(Original post by frost105)
Well these forms were for Boots and Monsoon so dont know how that worked
It's for statisical purposes - they have to meet certain quotas and show they're an equal opportunities employer.
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Catrionanism
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the mics have a bit to go yet
Ah, racism. Lovely.

Why is that - are quotas in place? I have heard that Catholics were not given jobs when there was a Protestant without one - particularly at Harland & Wolfe - in the dark, not so distant, past.
I believe my father was only the third or fourth Catholic Senior Lecturer in the history of Queen's University (the main university in Northern Ireland), and in my grandfather's time good jobs for Catholics were hopelessly hard to find. Until the Civil Rights movement Catholics were simply treated as second-class citizens -- it was "A Protestant State for a Protestant People". So yes, that sort of discrimination is less than two generations away.

Personally, I am not Catholic. But I am of Catholic background, and if I'd been born 50 years ago I definitely wouldn't be where I am today, so such casual racism as technik displayed above is unacceptable to me. Not to mention ignorant, and born of hate and fear.
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Agent Smith
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Questionnaires that ask for your cultural, racial and religious backgrounds in the name of equality are clearly hypocritical. If their authors really didn't attach any importance to it, they wouldn't bother to ask.

What are 'mics'? Is that a new variant on 'prods' and 'taigs'?
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