Career choices

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Scorpiodarlin
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I’m so confused on what I want to do in career based and it’s becoming difficult to know where I want do it
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adveetha
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hi! No need to worry too much.
Do you have any subjects that you prefer? If so you could research careers linked to those subjects.
After you find a couple you like, pinpoint the countries/unis you'd like to go to- something must have popped up in your mind- and look for the suitable course that falls in line with your subjects/career option.
I would also suggest interning at a couple of places related to the careers you chose earlier. This might help you choose as you will be able to experience and decide which options you prefer.
Hope this helps! :]
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Rabbit2
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Well, the first question i would ask is: where are you in the educational cycle?? If you are still 'at school' as they say - i.e. not immediately in need of entering uni, you have some time. If you are right at the point of having to select a uni and what course to do, you have really left it too long. However, you can still work something out. My criteria for selecting a career is the following: I ask myself: "Will this career [including degree and any necessary licensure] equip me to earn a decent living - with reasonable job security? If the answer is 'no' or.. 'i don't know', then it is time to drop that one from consideration and move on to the next one. Currently, in western society, the careers that a> pay the best, and b> are the most challenging/interesting are based upon "STEM" - Science, Technology, Engineering & Medicine. My personal statistics are: I hold a MSEE {Master's Degree in Electrical Engineering}, I have lived in 14 countries (so far) doing engineerideng, and am presently about half retired - altho i will take on a project if it looks interesting.

I would first figure what you will need to live: Take the amount that a flat will cost you, what you will need for groceries & eating out, how much you will need for clothing and transportation. Ask your 'rents or your mate's 'rents what it costs them. Many ppl won't have a clue, but some should know. I would recommend NOT figuring on a 'room-mate'. Those arrangements often don't work out, and you could end up not being able to afford a place [i.e. homeless], or having to put up with a very undesirable situation. If you can find a compatible room-mate, so much the better - it's money in the bank.

Then consider which careers in the STEM area would appeal to you. Perhaps computer programming [of which there are hundreds of thousands of different jobs]. Engineering might be an alternative too. Contact the professional societies [like the IEEE for engineers], and ask them to put you in contact with degreed professionals that would be willing to talk to you about their profession. Tell them that you are considering a career ..whatever it is. Ask them to refer you to people who have been working in their field for at least 10 years. You don't want fresh graduates - they don't know how things work yet.


The first two years or so, for most STEM degrees are pretty much the same - so if you decide to change from Computer Science to Electrical Engineering, nearly all the courses will be the same. Make up a list of questions to ask your degreed professional. Things such as: "How much do you make, where do you see yourself in 5 yrs, 10 yrs, If you had your education to do over, what would you change, What other careers did you consider, Why did you decide against them, If you had to find another job - how difficult do you think it would be, and how long would it take, Have you ever worked overseas, where, did you enjoy it, where else have you lived. This should give you a few ideas as to what to ask. WRITE DOWN the questions - so that you ask the same questions of each person you are interviewing. Also, write down the answers. Take them home and consider them. Interview the people one at a time. You want an individual answer, not a 'committee' answer, and you do NOT want the interviewees 'intimidating' each other. They will probably be much more honest and open if they are dealing only with you. Be SURE to thank your interviewee for spending time with you. After you go over their answers in your notes, send them a written 'thank you' to back up your verbal thanks - by mail if you have their mail addy - or by email if you don't.

Best of luck!!!
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Final Fantasy
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Do computer science and then a career in computer networks, software development, DevOps etc. (yes, I'm biased).
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Do computer science and then a career in computer networks, software development, DevOps etc. (yes, I'm biased).
That sounds like a reasonable choice(s) to me
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Do computer science and then a career in computer networks, software development, DevOps etc. (yes, I'm biased).A
Another, related choice, could be to become 'expert' on cellular and packet communications, and get a anti-terrorism job with MI-5 or MI-6. This could be very effectively combined with linguistics study in Pashtu, Farsi, Arabic, or Swahili. This area of COMINT & SIGINT is bound to grow in the years ahead, and [IMHO] prove very lucrative in the private sector. Cheers.
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