username4633536
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Hey guys,

I am planning on applying to Oxford after a gap year for either Biology, Biochemistry or Biomedical Science.

Biomedical Sciences seems like my ideal course, with most of my preferred topics however it seems very, very hard to get into.

Biology seems interesting, however the overwhelming focus on plant and animal behaviour/adaptation/ecology is slightly off-putting (I enjoy these topics, but have a much greater interest for the molecular side, in topics such as immunology, epigenetics and physiology). I wouldn’t mind a degree in this however as I do find it quite interesting!

Biochemistry seems like a good middle ground between the 2, however the website seems a bit elusive as to what exactly is covered in each of the broad overall titles in each year. Would anyone have any advice/tips for me, or any way of outlining the exact modules/topics covered? For example is the cell biology and genetics topic the exact same between all 3 courses?

Also, I am predicted 4A* at A level (in Further Maths, Maths, Biology and Chemistry, which are achievable for me if all goes to plan). I got 10A* at GCSE. Does anyone know if I have a chance, or what admission statistics are like for Post-Qualification applicants in a similar position to me?

Any help is hugely appreciated. Thank you!
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OXFbiochemist
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Hiya,I'm a first year at Oxford doing biochem. It six modules in first year: cellular (lots of metabolism, actually really intersting and much better presented than at A levels), practical course (kinda of a pain ngl but supposedly gets better in 2nd year), mechanistic (lots and lots of organic chemistry, most of mechanisms needed for the entire course is taught in first year) , molecular (proteins, DNA, membranes. Really interesting), physical (some quantum mechanics,rates of reaction, thermodynamics, etc) , and quantitative.The tutor you get will be a specialist in one of these things so will go quite in depth with it. Important to choose a tutor that does something that interests you so have a look at that as well when choosing a college. It's definitely one of the harder subjects at Oxford but should get better in 2nd year workload wise.
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username4633536
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(Original post by OXFbiochemist)
Hiya,I'm a first year at Oxford doing biochem. It six modules in first year: cellular (lots of metabolism, actually really intersting and much better presented than at A levels), practical course (kinda of a pain ngl but supposedly gets better in 2nd year), mechanistic (lots and lots of organic chemistry, most of mechanisms needed for the entire course is taught in first year) , molecular (proteins, DNA, membranes. Really interesting), physical (some quantum mechanics,rates of reaction, thermodynamics, etc) , and quantitative.The tutor you get will be a specialist in one of these things so will go quite in depth with it. Important to choose a tutor that does something that interests you so have a look at that as well when choosing a college. It's definitely one of the harder subjects at Oxford but should get better in 2nd year workload wise.
Sounds great! I was just wondering if you touch on topics such as pharmacology, immunology, physiology, neuroscience, genetics and epigenetics (I also enjoy cell biology and biochemistry but these are obviously covered!). These are topics I think I would enjoy but am unsure if they are covered in the biochemical degree, would you be able to let me know if they are to any extent? Also topics such as genetics that overlap between biomedical science and biology, are they taught the same in each course (I.e do you have the same lectures and stuff?) Any idea what sort of topics/fields are available in later years? I am very grateful if you can answer any of these questions, although I realise it may be too much to ask! Thank you very much for your help 😊
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OXFbiochemist
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(Original post by hariisawesome)
Sounds great! I was just wondering if you touch on topics such as pharmacology, immunology, physiology, neuroscience, genetics and epigenetics (I also enjoy cell biology and biochemistry but these are obviously covered!). These are topics I think I would enjoy but am unsure if they are covered in the biochemical degree, would you be able to let me know if they are to any extent? Also topics such as genetics that overlap between biomedical science and biology, are they taught the same in each course (I.e do you have the same lectures and stuff?) Any idea what sort of topics/fields are available in later years? I am very grateful if you can answer any of these questions, although I realise it may be too much to ask! Thank you very much for your help 😊
I have had a lot of genetics and epigenetics but I think that's partly because that's the field my tutor is in. The lectures do cover it quite a bit as well with even more focus on epigenetics in the next few years. I don't think there's too much neuroscience, maybe one or two lecture series on it. I'm fairly certain we will cover pharmacology and immunology in the year 2 and 3 but the course recently changed so not too sure. There's always the master in year 4 where you get to focus on something you like and write a thesis on it even if you haven't covered it much in the degree. hope that helps
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username4633536
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(Original post by OXFbiochemist)
I have had a lot of genetics and epigenetics but I think that's partly because that's the field my tutor is in. The lectures do cover it quite a bit as well with even more focus on epigenetics in the next few years. I don't think there's too much neuroscience, maybe one or two lecture series on it. I'm fairly certain we will cover pharmacology and immunology in the year 2 and 3 but the course recently changed so not too sure. There's always the master in year 4 where you get to focus on something you like and write a thesis on it even if you haven't covered it much in the degree. hope that helps
Thank you very much! Definitely helps. I am very grateful.
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