The Philosopher's Corner 2005 Watch

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Zarathustra
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Adhsur)
I think it is unfair to make a judgement about the whole of Mill's work simply by examining one of his theories.
...Which is why I commented that, whilst I didn't like Utilitarianism, his phenomenalism was interesting and overall he probably wasn't that bad...
:confused:

ZarathustraX

EDIT: Adhsur, where did you get your copy of the Robert Martin text? I've been after that one for ages!
Anthony Grayling one of the best around!?! :rofl:
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Adhsur
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#82
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#82
(Original post by Zarathustra)
EDIT: Adhsur, where did you get your copy of the Robert Martin text? I've been after that one for ages!
Anthony Grayling one of the best around!?! :rofl:
I'm afraid that I got it from my Dad who has a great philosophy collection. Try and find it on Amazon (and its marketplace) or ebay? Or try abebooks which is very good.

As for Grayling, ok admittedly I haven't read much of his work but I like the way he writes short essays on various topics, many of which appear in the Times. Some of his views are really good I think. In fact, I do believe that he's a really active philosopher in terms of his publications and there are hardly many left. There is nothing wrong with Grayling. :p:
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Reema
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#83
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#83
Well I've not read AC Grayling so I have no idea. Seems to be popular though!

And thanks for the suggestion. Yes where did you get the Martin book? I saw that in the Girton Library and went "oooh!". .

And yes, Mill's phenomenalism was fascinating. Was hoping I'd get to discuss that at Camb interview (oh well...)
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Adhsur
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#84
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#84
(Original post by Reema)
And yes, Mill's phenomenalism was fascinating. Was hoping I'd get to discuss that at Camb interview (oh well...)
I still keep regretting some things I said in interview and wishing I could have discussed other things. And then I realise I've got an offer so why am I being bitter :rolleyes: :confused:
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as1
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#85
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#85
Hey, just quickly in reply to a few things people have said:

"I'll go order that now I think, any thoughts on the other book about applying logic to philosophy? The one at http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...4728805-3303867 "

I wouldn't really use anything else to be honest. Smith's book is fairly straight-forward (even if he does have a tendency to use overily complicated langauge to describe things that were not that hard to understand in the first place!).

"I'm feeling a bit left out of this thread of mine, having not heard of Adorno/Frankfurt School. Am I to understand this is some kind of political philosophy? Not quite my forte, but it does sound interesting."

There isn't a great deal of compulsory political philosophy, so don't worry about it. The political phil options are mostly in the second year. All you do in the first year is study Leviathan (and actually, even that is optional). I must say, I like Leviathan (get the Cambridge University Press edition, it is by far the best), even if I don't agree with everything Hobbes has to say. That is the thing about phil @ cam (I don't know what it is like at other uni's), you have to be prepared to be open minded. Too many people find a belief, or something they like and defend it to the cows come home- rejecting and destroying everything opposing it. You can't do this... you have to be prepared to just accept that people have alot to say, and it is your job to sift through it and work out where the flaws are, and come to a balanced conclusion (doesn't mean you can't fall on one side, just that you shouldn't be aggressive in destroying other philosophers - everyone should be properly respected and too often people think philosophy is about being right, and finding that all-time great theory, when it isn't, it is about analysing, understanding and evaluating. Philosophy can really be such a wonderful subject because you can really let yourself go and just be original, creative and exciting... but anyway, all subjects have their good/bad points).

AS
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coldfish
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#86
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#86
Hi! Sorry to interrupt the discussion on Mill, which I entirely understood... honest. *tries to look honest*

I got an offer to study Philosophy at Queens', so grades permitting, I shall be seeing you lot next year. I'm into music quite a bit, I love Placebo and Nine Inch Nails et al... but I like piano music (Chopin and Rachmaninov, particularly) mainly 'cos I play as much of it as my (rather limited) ability allows me. Like Rik_Rock I'm into geeky RPG stuff, though I don't -quite- descend into the dank depths of pen+paper stuff.

As far as Philosophers go, I haven't ever found the -one- that I agree with completely. I'm reading Russel's History of Western Philosophy at the moment... I'm trying to get to grips with how the bits fit into the whole before really delving into the details of each bit. (Yes, well spotted. This is a fancy excuse for "I know nothing")

Alex
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Rik_Rock
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#87
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#87
(Original post by coldfish)
Hi! Sorry to interrupt the discussion on Mill, which I entirely understood... honest. *tries to look honest*

I got an offer to study Philosophy at Queens', so grades permitting, I shall be seeing you lot next year. I'm into music quite a bit, I love Placebo and Nine Inch Nails et al... but I like piano music (Chopin and Rachmaninov, particularly) mainly 'cos I play as much of it as my (rather limited) ability allows me. Like Rik_Rock I'm into geeky RPG stuff, though I don't -quite- descend into the dank depths of pen+paper stuff.

As far as Philosophers go, I haven't ever found the -one- that I agree with completely. I'm reading Russel's History of Western Philosophy at the moment... I'm trying to get to grips with how the bits fit into the whole before really delving into the details of each bit. (Yes, well spotted. This is a fancy excuse for "I know nothing")

Alex
Hey, welcome, I'll add you to the list at the top of the thread

I'm sure you weren't being too derogatory, but pen-and-paper RPGs are easily the best and most fulfilling type of role-play out there. Any time you've been playing a computer game and thought 'oh, i wish it would let me xxxxx', now you can! I might go ahead and bring my books if anybody wants to have a bash, although it can be a little time-consuming. Great fun though.

Hmm, I think I'm going to pick up the Smith logic book and then make my way through some more philosophy of religion. Fun fun!!
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Reema
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#88
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#88
I agree with everything you said As1. That's really why I'm so looking forward to studying Philosophy at Cambridge!

Welcome coldfish - well done on your offer, and we can add another person to the TSR meet-up . Well, if you agree with one philosopher completely, what is the point of studying Philosophy? I admire certain philosophers, but I don't think I'll ever agree with one philosopher completely. It would be an awful waste of your intellect if you did so - there's always a way to improve.

And I LOVE placebo - listening to The Bitter End right now...good stuff
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coldfish
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#89
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#89
(Original post by Rik_Rock)
Hey, welcome, I'll add you to the list at the top of the thread

I'm sure you weren't being too derogatory, but pen-and-paper RPGs are easily the best and most fulfilling type of role-play out there. Any time you've been playing a computer game and thought 'oh, i wish it would let me xxxxx', now you can! I might go ahead and bring my books if anybody wants to have a bash, although it can be a little time-consuming. Great fun though.

Hmm, I think I'm going to pick up the Smith logic book and then make my way through some more philosophy of religion. Fun fun!!
Yeah, I was only joking about the RPG. I play on a text MUD (Multi-User Somethingorother), it is excellent... I have about one hundred and fifty days of online time with my main character. Far better than any picture-based computer game... so much more detail is possible. How can you show a feeling or a mood in pictures? In what picture-based game can texture be shown with the same degree of vividness as colour?

I've always wanted to do the more traditional RPG stuff though, to be honest. It probably won't be for me, I have a fatal tendency towards curiosity.

Alex
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Reema
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#90
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#90
Can someone link me to this? I've never heard of these MUD and RPG thingies....
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coldfish
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#91
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#91
The one that I play on is based on the Discworld series of books by Terry Pratchett (another geeky love-affair of mine). The address for the web-site on which it is hosted is http://discworld.atuin.net/lpc/ , but if you're serious about starting to play then I'll PM you my MSN address or character name... starting playing these games (especially if you've never played one before, or have not that much experience with command prompt OS thingies)

Alex
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musicbloke
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#92
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#92
(Original post by as1)
That is the thing about phil @ cam (I don't know what it is like at other uni's), you have to be prepared to be open minded. Too many people find a belief, or something they like and defend it to the cows come home- rejecting and destroying everything opposing it. You can't do this... you have to be prepared to just accept that people have alot to say, and it is your job to sift through it and work out where the flaws are, and come to a balanced conclusion (doesn't mean you can't fall on one side, just that you shouldn't be aggressive in destroying other philosophers - everyone should be properly respected and too often people think philosophy is about being right, and finding that all-time great theory, when it isn't, it is about analysing, understanding and evaluating.

This is clearly the same in any essay based course in Cambridge and not specific to philosophy (although of course postmodernism has led to a certain level of decline in sceptical methods)

MB
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lskdgjsj
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#93
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#93
(Original post by Reema)

Do any philosophers wish to recommend me any further preparatory texts for the summer?
The philosophy faculty, in the person of Peter Smith as it happens, author of Formal Logic, has put together a fairly thorough list of preparatory reading, which you may have seen before:

http://www.phil.cam.ac.uk/teaching_s...s/reading.html

It's quite difficult to recommend further reading: if you want simply to be knowledgeable about philosophy per se, then you may as well read the entire canon systematically; if you want stimulus for independent philosophical thought, then there are two types of books I could recommend: those that lie on the periphery of philosophy, or are purely literary; and those that are especially fecund in ideas, but sufficiently incomplete or vague to allow the flourishing of new thought. Of the former I could recommend such works as Lichtenberg's Waste Books, reissued fairly recently by the New York Review of Books, which exercised a profound influence on Nietzsche, Einstein, Wittgenstein, Tolstoy, and so forth; or as a purely literary work, by way of example, Jorge Luis Borges' Fictions, short stories as artifice, rather than impressionistic portrait a la Chekhov, which contain remarkable meditations on the nature of language, identity, temporality, &c. Of the latter (and I realize this is tendentious), I'd recommend Plato's Theaetetus, his most sustained discussion of epistemology, and St Augustine's Confessions, two works especially valued by Wittgenstein (I believe he carried with him a copy of the Confessions in the Great War; remarkable when you consider his reluctance to read the works of other philosophers, or even to attend philosophical lecturers delivered by friends).

I am inordinately fond of continental philosophy, and would naturally like to impress upon you the greatness of Kant, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Heidegger, Cioran, and so forth, but this sort of thing features comparatively little in the Cambridge philosophy tripos, and if you're inclined to pursue it, you can always take it as an option in part II.
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Reema
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#94
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#94
Wow, he carried Confessions with him in the War? You learn a new thing everyday...(Somehow I never thought Wittgenstein in particular would've been into Augustine but that shows you how much I know!)

Thank you for the "literary" style of philosophy. I don't know if it's just me, but TS Eliot has always stimulated my thought in this area (it's NOT philosophy in any sense), but somehow a line of his poetry always manages to start off a train of thought in my head. It's fantastic (for me)...
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Zarathustra
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#95
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#95
(Original post by svidrigailov)
or as a purely literary work, by way of example, Jorge Luis Borges' Fictions...
*Pokes nose in to advertise Berkeley again*

If you get Fictions (it's excellent!) then be sure to try Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius and The Circular Ruins - they're both explorations of Immaterialist Idealism that really add to any purely philosophical (as opposed to literary) text you could read on them.

ZarathustraX

PS: Welcome to the new guy!
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coldfish
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#96
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#96
Or Dostoevsky! In particular Notes from the Underground seemed to have lots of existential ideas, at least as far as I understood the book and the term existential. :P
Plus he really is rather good reading. Crime and Punishment, numnum.

Alex
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Reema
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#97
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#97
I LOVE Dostoyevsky! I read and analysed the Brothers Karamazov for an essay competition (literature), and we went off on a discussion of Free Will/Philosophy of Religion in that novel in my Cambridge interview. Very enjoyable! And plenty of existentialist thought in there too.
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Zarathustra
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#98
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#98
Dear Philosophers,

Word has it, Warwick are finally getting moving on Phil V500 offers
:rolleyes:

Can't remember who else here applied there...?

Anyway, I'm still pissed that they've ignored me for so long - I want a speedy rejection, at least.

ZarathustraX
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coldfish
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#99
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#99
Hrm... the only uni I have left now are UCL, who invited me to a non-optional open day in February. I need to get around to sending them a letter telling them that I won't be there, I can't be bothered to fork out money for a train ticket and wasting a day in London when I know that I won't be accepting their off.
I want the whole thing to hurry up so I get my sheet with all my offers on from UCAS... Yay Cambridge and Edinburgh!

Alex
. o 0 (Or maybe York...)
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Reema
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#100
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#100
Please for gods sake, hurry up Warwick ....I AM hoping they'll be my insurance though, so I won't be happy if they reject me at all. Rather wait and get an offer than get a speedy rejection .

Warwick are notoriously slow though, so I knew in advance they'd take forever.
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