(Not Finished) What would you grade this essay so far? English Literature (J+H)

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Sam33837
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Throughout the novella of Jekyll and Hyde, Mr. Hyde’s construction tends to be that of an “outsider” or freak. The idea of Hyde’s outsider qualities, and the fright he inflicts on others can be compared to Caesure Lombroso’s theory of Physiognomy, where criminals were proven to be born with deformities, such as Hyde’s “dwarfish” height . The novella is set in Victorian times, when people like Hyde would be considered “troglodytic”, or in some instances freaks, simply due to their physical appearance. The idea of “born criminality” is employed in the construction of Hyde's personality and appearance - Hyde being a man with obvious disfigurements and criminal tendencies, viewed as unorthodox (and feared) by the mainly Christian people of Victorian society. It could be said that Hyde is a symbol of Lombroso’s theory, as he shares both criminal nature, and disfigurements. This essay will explore how Hyde is presented as an outsider, and disliked by many people - even feared.

The foreign representation of Mr. Hyde’s appearance demonstrates how Elfield’s recount to Utterson aims to describe Hyde as an outsider, in this belief-driven society. In particular, the quote “damned Juggernaut” - as Elfield is recounting Hyde “trampling” over the girl, raises the idea of Hyde’s frightening, powerful appearance, but also his foreign or outsider place in society. In particular, the religious noun “Juggernaut”, is representative of the Indian God, which many people bow down to, in processions. Moreover, we see the obvious insert of “damned”, meaning when someone goes to Hell, or is made an “outsider” of Heaven. The use of “Juggernaut”, makes Stevenson’s readership - who happen to be Victorian - dislike the man even more, with the addition of his “foreign” or in this case Indian description. The readership is not only frightened of the man’s physical appearance, but his heritage. Moreover, this idea of Hyde being a foreigner is echoed when we see Stevenson describing Hyde’s “black sneering coolness”, after he is confronted with the crime he commits - in this case being the trampling of the girl, again. In this case, black is not only symbolic of the Devil, Satan’s colour, but is also possibly describing Hyde’s skin colour “black”. In particular, “sneering” could be used to create an effect of satisfaction on Hyde’s behalf, after commiting a crime in a foreign country - possibly due to the potentially xenophobic comments he recieves from Victorian society.
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username4503148
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(Original post by Sam33837)
Throughout the novella of Jekyll and Hyde, Mr. Hyde’s construction tends to be that of an “outsider” or freak. The idea of Hyde’s outsider qualities, and the fright he inflicts on others can be compared to Caesure Lombroso’s theory of Physiognomy, where criminals were proven to be born with deformities, such as Hyde’s “dwarfish” height . The novella is set in Victorian times, when people like Hyde would be considered “troglodytic”, or in some instances freaks, simply due to their physical appearance. The idea of “born criminality” is employed in the construction of Hyde's personality and appearance - Hyde being a man with obvious disfigurements and criminal tendencies, viewed as unorthodox (and feared) by the mainly Christian people of Victorian society. It could be said that Hyde is a symbol of Lombroso’s theory, as he shares both criminal nature, and disfigurements. This essay will explore how Hyde is presented as an outsider, and disliked by many people - even feared.

The foreign representation of Mr. Hyde’s appearance demonstrates how Elfield’s recount to Utterson aims to describe Hyde as an outsider, in this belief-driven society. In particular, the quote “damned Juggernaut” - as Elfield is recounting Hyde “trampling” over the girl, raises the idea of Hyde’s frightening, powerful appearance, but also his foreign or outsider place in society. In particular, the religious noun “Juggernaut”, is representative of the Indian God, which many people bow down to, in processions. Moreover, we see the obvious insert of “damned”, meaning when someone goes to Hell, or is made an “outsider” of Heaven. The use of “Juggernaut”, makes Stevenson’s readership - who happen to be Victorian - dislike the man even more, with the addition of his “foreign” or in this case Indian description. The readership is not only frightened of the man’s physical appearance, but his heritage. Moreover, this idea of Hyde being a foreigner is echoed when we see Stevenson describing Hyde’s “black sneering coolness”, after he is confronted with the crime he commits - in this case being the trampling of the girl, again. In this case, black is not only symbolic of the Devil, Satan’s colour, but is also possibly describing Hyde’s skin colour “black”. In particular, “sneering” could be used to create an effect of satisfaction on Hyde’s behalf, after commiting a crime in a foreign country - possibly due to the potentially xenophobic comments he recieves from Victorian society.
Make sure that you include the title so we know what essay you are writing!!
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Mehvij12345
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(Original post by Sam33837)
Throughout the novella of Jekyll and Hyde, Mr. Hyde’s construction tends to be that of an “outsider” or freak. The idea of Hyde’s outsider qualities, and the fright he inflicts on others can be compared to Caesure Lombroso’s theory of Physiognomy, where criminals were proven to be born with deformities, such as Hyde’s “dwarfish” height . The novella is set in Victorian times, when people like Hyde would be considered “troglodytic”, or in some instances freaks, simply due to their physical appearance. The idea of “born criminality” is employed in the construction of Hyde's personality and appearance - Hyde being a man with obvious disfigurements and criminal tendencies, viewed as unorthodox (and feared) by the mainly Christian people of Victorian society. It could be said that Hyde is a symbol of Lombroso’s theory, as he shares both criminal nature, and disfigurements. This essay will explore how Hyde is presented as an outsider, and disliked by many people - even feared.

The foreign representation of Mr. Hyde’s appearance demonstrates how Elfield’s recount to Utterson aims to describe Hyde as an outsider, in this belief-driven society. In particular, the quote “damned Juggernaut” - as Elfield is recounting Hyde “trampling” over the girl, raises the idea of Hyde’s frightening, powerful appearance, but also his foreign or outsider place in society. In particular, the religious noun “Juggernaut”, is representative of the Indian God, which many people bow down to, in processions. Moreover, we see the obvious insert of “damned”, meaning when someone goes to Hell, or is made an “outsider” of Heaven. The use of “Juggernaut”, makes Stevenson’s readership - who happen to be Victorian - dislike the man even more, with the addition of his “foreign” or in this case Indian description. The readership is not only frightened of the man’s physical appearance, but his heritage. Moreover, this idea of Hyde being a foreigner is echoed when we see Stevenson describing Hyde’s “black sneering coolness”, after he is confronted with the crime he commits - in this case being the trampling of the girl, again. In this case, black is not only symbolic of the Devil, Satan’s colour, but is also possibly describing Hyde’s skin colour “black”. In particular, “sneering” could be used to create an effect of satisfaction on Hyde’s behalf, after commiting a crime in a foreign country - possibly due to the potentially xenophobic comments he recieves from Victorian society.
I am not entirely sure what you are writing about but here are some improvements i think you may want to add (in my opinion.)
1. Impact on the readers, What is Stevenson trying to convey?
2. Maybe adding on the Satan analysis by linking 'sneering' to sibilance and chain it onto Edenic imagery of the snake, putting him away as an outcast.
3. Mention that it is a gothic novel and was published on 1885.
4. Maybe link it to the bigger picture?
Again take these with a pinch of salt because i don't know which exam board you are on and which section you're writing up. Hope this helps!
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Samara1601
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(Original post by Sam33837)
Throughout the novella of Jekyll and Hyde, Mr. Hyde’s construction tends to be that of an “outsider” or freak. The idea of Hyde’s outsider qualities, and the fright he inflicts on others can be compared to Caesure Lombroso’s theory of Physiognomy, where criminals were proven to be born with deformities, such as Hyde’s “dwarfish” height . The novella is set in Victorian times, when people like Hyde would be considered “troglodytic”, or in some instances freaks, simply due to their physical appearance. The idea of “born criminality” is employed in the construction of Hyde's personality and appearance - Hyde being a man with obvious disfigurements and criminal tendencies, viewed as unorthodox (and feared) by the mainly Christian people of Victorian society. It could be said that Hyde is a symbol of Lombroso’s theory, as he shares both criminal nature, and disfigurements. This essay will explore how Hyde is presented as an outsider, and disliked by many people - even feared.

The foreign representation of Mr. Hyde’s appearance demonstrates how Elfield’s recount to Utterson aims to describe Hyde as an outsider, in this belief-driven society. In particular, the quote “damned Juggernaut” - as Elfield is recounting Hyde “trampling” over the girl, raises the idea of Hyde’s frightening, powerful appearance, but also his foreign or outsider place in society. In particular, the religious noun “Juggernaut”, is representative of the Indian God, which many people bow down to, in processions. Moreover, we see the obvious insert of “damned”, meaning when someone goes to Hell, or is made an “outsider” of Heaven. The use of “Juggernaut”, makes Stevenson’s readership - who happen to be Victorian - dislike the man even more, with the addition of his “foreign” or in this case Indian description. The readership is not only frightened of the man’s physical appearance, but his heritage. Moreover, this idea of Hyde being a foreigner is echoed when we see Stevenson describing Hyde’s “black sneering coolness”, after he is confronted with the crime he commits - in this case being the trampling of the girl, again. In this case, black is not only symbolic of the Devil, Satan’s colour, but is also possibly describing Hyde’s skin colour “black”. In particular, “sneering” could be used to create an effect of satisfaction on Hyde’s behalf, after commiting a crime in a foreign country - possibly due to the potentially xenophobic comments he recieves from Victorian society.
i'm also studying J&H and here are a few tips i've been taught (you don't have to do them or even read them if you don't want to):
- i've always been taught never to explictely say "this essay will..." or "this quote..." and instead just inbed the quote
- you have talked a lot about context around religion, especially the devil, so maybemnetion that in christian victorian society it was believed that disabilities were a sign of being cursed by the devil
- personally i don't interpret "black sneering coolness" as being a reference to Hyde's skin but rather the complete lack of emotion he demonstrates on his face and how difficult it is to read

hope this helps but these are only a couple suggestions
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