cupcakemania22
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to be doing medicine at a Russell group university or be doing a languages degree at oxbridge? I know it doesn't matter but I'm curious which is regarded higher. thanks.
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concernedLMAO
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(Original post by cupcakemania22)
to be doing medicine at a Russell group university or be doing a languages degree at oxbridge? I know it doesn't matter but I'm curious which is regarded higher. thanks.
Let’s face it. If you’re studying medicine at a university other than oxbridge or languages at oxbridge you’re pretty much doomed to sleep on the streets, begging for pennies to buy your daily greggs. Only as an oxbridge educated doctor will you be able to live a lavish life full of McDonald’s cheeseburgers.
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ecolier
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(Original post by cupcakemania22)
to be doing medicine at a Russell group university or be doing a languages degree at oxbridge? I know it doesn't matter but I'm curious which is regarded higher. thanks.
:argh: Rankings, prestige or Russell Group means nothing for Medicine, at all

If you must look at rankings, in the top 10 there are 6 non-RG med schools, and in the bottom 10 there are 8 RG med schools.

(Original post by concernedLMAO)
Let’s face it. If you’re studying medicine at a university other than oxbridge or languages at oxbridge you’re pretty much doomed to sleep on the streets, begging for pennies to buy your daily greggs. Only as an oxbridge educated doctor will you be able to live a lavish life full of McDonald’s cheeseburgers.
Correct answer :congrats:

Indeed, I am messaging this from under a bridge shivering in the cold :cry:
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Serene Dreams
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(Original post by concernedLMAO)
Let’s face it. If you’re studying medicine at a university other than oxbridge or languages at oxbridge you’re pretty much doomed to sleep on the streets, begging for pennies to buy your daily greggs. Only as an oxbridge educated doctor will you be able to live a lavish life full of McDonald’s cheeseburgers.
The best post I have read on TSR today. :rofl2:
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cupcakemania22
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hahaha! fair enough I get what you are saying but in all seriousness which one would you be most impressed by, as in who would you look at and be like: wow, they are smart-smart?
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ecolier
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(Original post by cupcakemania22)
hahaha! fair enough I get what you are saying but in all seriousness which one would you be most impressed by, as in who would you look at and be like: wow, they are smart-smart?
Well, certainly not someone who did Medicine in the UK because they could have done a bunch of other more lucrative / rewarding degrees.
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AspiringLLMer
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I don’t understand the motives underpinning this question. Are you asking because you are deciding which route to pursue? Or is it purely to satisfy a hypothetical curiosity?

If it is the former, I would be worried if any of my doctors asked a question like this on TSR prior to pursuing their medical degree.

If it is the latter, these are not comparable. Both are rigorous and respectable degrees.
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concernedLMAO
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(Original post by cupcakemania22)
hahaha! fair enough I get what you are saying but in all seriousness which one would you be most impressed by, as in who would you look at and be like: wow, they are smart-smart?
I think the issue is it sounds very much like you’re picking based off of prestige instead of actual interest....

But seriously I’d guess the average oxbridge languages student is a bit smarter, but with medicine you’re very likely going to be doing something very meaningful which requires more than just raw intelligence. I would “respect” the medical student more cause of this.

Edit: to clarify though this really shouldn’t play into your decision
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TSRTD
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(Original post by cupcakemania22)
to be doing medicine at a Russell group university or be doing a languages degree at oxbridge? I know it doesn't matter but I'm curious which is regarded higher. thanks.
Statistically speaking medicine is more difficult to get into - a greater percentage of language applicants to oxbridge are successful than medical students are in landing a place at a med school...
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george37373737
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(Original post by ecolier)
:argh: Rankings, prestige or Russell Group means nothing for Medicine, at all

If you must look at rankings, in the top 10 there are 6 non-RG med schools, and in the bottom 10 there are 8 RG med schools.



Correct answer :congrats:

Indeed, I am messaging this from under a bridge shivering in the cold :cry:
I will have to disagree with you. There is prestige in medicine in a way; yes everyone will become a doctor and it will not matter technically. But RG are much harder to get into than some of the other schools, plus they provide better research facilities and are more established for example Kent and Medway hasn’t been around for long so it’s not as reliable. Plus there are better resources to those that go to good RG universities as they have more funding. Those that attend RG are usually more intelligent too as they on average require higher GCSEs, higher UCAT and better academics on record. To argue that RG on average aren’t superior is blatantly wrong; they’re more competitive for a reason. For example, someone applying to Anglia Ruskin only needs 2500 UCAT, someone applying to Bristol needs 2800 UCAT. It’s an aptitude test after all.
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ecolier
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(Original post by george37373737)
I will have to disagree with you. There is prestige in medicine in a way; yes everyone will become a doctor and it will not matter technically. But RG are much harder to get into than some of the other schools, plus they provide better research facilities and are more established for example Kent and Medway hasn’t been around for long so it’s not as reliable. Plus there are better resources to those that go to good RG universities as they have more funding. Those that attend RG are usually more intelligent too as they on average require higher GCSEs, higher UCAT and better academics on record. To argue that RG on average aren’t superior is blatantly wrong; they’re more competitive for a reason. For example, someone applying to Anglia Ruskin only needs 2500 UCAT, someone applying to Bristol needs 2800 UCAT. It’s an aptitude test after all.
For specialty training in the UK, where you graduated from is made blind to the assessors so it doesn't matter at all.

Plus, the most competitive med schools (in terms of ratios) are KMMS, ARU and UCLan.

Just because one med school is more UCAT-heavy, doesn't mean that their students will be of a higher calibre. It's just a different method of assessment - and all med schools vary in how they judge their applicants.

Dundee, Aberdeen, Brighton Sussex are all incredibly hard to get in - and they rank higher than Cambridge.

Can I ask your background?

P.S. Thanks for registering just to say this.
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george37373737
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(Original post by ecolier)
For specialty training in the UK, where you graduated from is made blind to the assessors so it doesn't matter at all.

Plus, the most competitive med schools (in terms of ratios) are KMMS, ARU and UCLan.

Just because one med school is more UCAT-heavy, doesn't mean that their students will be of a higher calibre. It's just a different method of assessment - and all med schools vary in how they judge their applicants.

Dundee, Aberdeen, Brighton Sussex are all incredibly hard to get in - and they rank higher than Cambridge.

Can I ask your background?

P.S. Thanks for registering just to say this.
I’m a second year medical student in London FYI. I personally think that those ratios are meaningless. It’s based on too many factors, hence they are not the “most difficult” to get into. For example, comparing ARU and Manchester- there are far less places in ARU than somewhere in a RG such as Manchester (contributing to the “ratios” which don’t account for these). I think the biggest flaw with these ratios are the type of applicants applying. People base their application process depending on their profile. Everyone knows the cut off score for ARU is like 2300-2500, hence attracting those with lower scores and less academic background. There is no reason why majority of applicants with better scores and a better profile would apply to it (unless very few, who wanted a safe option)- it’s not as highly regarded etc. Whereas Manchester will attract those with better academics, prioritisation of B1+B2 and usually scores way over 2700. RG are superior, both in terms of what they offer themselves as a university but also the kind of students that attend there.
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ecolier
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(Original post by george37373737)
I’m a second year medical student in London FYI. I personally think that those ratios are meaningless. It’s based on too many factors, hence they are not the “most difficult” to get into. For example, comparing ARU and Manchester- there are far less places in ARU than somewhere in a RG such as Manchester (contributing to the “ratios” which don’t account for these). I think the biggest flaw with these ratios are the type of applicants applying. People base their application process depending on their profile. Everyone knows the cut off score for ARU is like 2300-2500, hence attracting those with lower scores and less academic background. There is no reason why majority of applicants with better scores and a better profile would apply to it (unless very few, who wanted a safe option)- it’s not as highly regarded etc. Whereas Manchester will attract those with better academics, prioritisation of B1+B2 and usually scores way over 2700. RG are superior, both in terms of what they offer themselves as a university but also the kind of students that attend there.
Well if you are basing this on the "calibre of students", then studying at an institution that will attract the high fliers are even worse.

As you may (or may not) know you'll be ranked against your year for FY1 placements (Educational Performance Measure = EPM) by decile, the chances are you will find it harder to come top or win prizes in Oxbridge, and maybe easier in Buckingham.

Because you don't get an advantage for graduating from Oxbridge (in specialty training), in effect you are "sacrificing" for nothing. Remember that any advantage that you gain is literally just "bragging rights", as a doctor working in the NHS no one will ask you "where you graduated" apart from as part of informal discussions.

Here's a debate about whether it's "worth studying at Oxbridge", for example: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6781954

I still stand by my original statement that Russell Group means nothing for medicine, it's a research alliance, a marketing gimmick and most medical students do not do much (if any) research during their medical studies.

If you are interested in research as a medical student you can always study at a non-RG uni and intercalate at a more research-intensive university by liaising and negotiating with other unis.

P.S. I can assure you that many med applicants definitely do not apply strategically and therefore not many will know that ARU has a lower UCAT so apply to them. However, they may know that KMMS's standard offer is AAB and so that's why last year they shot up to the top of the competition-ratio-league.
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ROTL94
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I find neither on their own particularly impressive. Individuals are impressive on the whole not just individual aspects of them like where they went to university or what they did there.
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Oxbridge is probably a bit harder to get into I guess, if we take your meaning as overall 'Oxbridge' rather than picking a specific, less competitive than average course :dontknow:

Is this how you are picking your career? :laugh:
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