How does Stevenson portray Soho in this extract?

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dollsforlols
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The dismal quarter of Soho in this extract? Write a point of analysis, keeping in mind what you've learned about Victorian London.
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dazai768
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(Original post by dollsforlols)
The dismal quarter of Soho in this extract? Write a point of analysis, keeping in mind what you've learned about Victorian London.
hey : ) i don't know what extract you wanted specifically, but overall, the contrast between soho and the posher parts of london are there to represent the duplicity within the surroundings. These surroundings are places which are habitats to man, therefore represent the duplicity within man (that is a basic idea)
i attached a document where i do the same topic just in a slightly different question, feel free to read (there is an annotated extract), i did this a while ago so its probably not my best work because i improved (make sure not to copy word for word!)

in terms of going into detail, contextually, Jekyll was given the John Hunter house (this was the house of a famous scientist who robbed graves illegally to do medical research of the body, he ended up getting a lot of bad press initially for being so immoral but in the end, his discoveries shaped the medical world we live in). Stevenson deliberately gives Jekyll this house to suggest the idea that despite Jekyll's actions and double persona being immoral and heretical, it may lead to great scientific discovery eventually. Once again, Stevenson makes Utterson hide Jekyll's will at the end where he reveals this, so he is suggesting that the upper class are the hinderance to great discovery for the better of humanity. From this, you can say that Soho itself is a construct for the idea of development - despite it being ramshackle, it is there and it is growing, its presence is what matters, however, because it has not been maintained, those surrounding it do not pay attention to it and give it a bad reputation by default - there is no desire for change. This symbolises the idea that the upper class will only ever think about themselves when trying to be comfortable with life, the areas that they discard have potential to be just as great as theirs. (this links to the repression within the society, no ambition and no desire for excitement or interest in newer things), Stevenson is heavily critisising this.
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