what do you think is the most useless subject in general?

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nikkiblonsky
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Ik this will vary between people so I just wanted to see what people think
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lord shimada
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it depends on what you want to go on to do but i think stuff like general studies dont specify on anything,critical thinking is also not accepted at many unis
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nikkiblonsky
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(Original post by lord shimada)
it depends on what you want to go on to do but i think stuff like general studies dont specify on anything,critical thinking is also not accepted at many unis
hmm yh I think peoples personal experiences influence a lot as well
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by lord shimada)
it depends on what you want to go on to do but i think stuff like general studies dont specify on anything,critical thinking is also not accepted at many unis
As someone who had to do general studies at a-level (it was compulsory at my old 6th form), I totally agree that general studies is a load of shite.
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jamiet0185
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If we are to say, "what is the most useless subject that a sizeable number of people do?" I would nominate BTEC Sport
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tinygirl96
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Computer studies and history
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ellaa01
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ICT
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ellaa01
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(Original post by Wise Goldie)
i thought you would say PE lol
I like/d PE.
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Spelunker
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im biased but geography. i know people need to know the basics like country names and generally where everything is but every geography teacher i ever had either disliked me and just taught the 3 people they liked in geography or was simply not there to teach the lesson OR just showed us episodes of Bear Grylls (which i guess was ok). i couldn't tell you were exeter was on a map but im doing fine in life
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a.planet
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(Original post by ellaa01)
ICT
I agree to disagree. The world is moving toward everything tech related and we need to know how to at least use the software and understand the basics of a computer for most jobs.
Same for computer science
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ellaa01
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(Original post by a.planet)
I agree to disagree. The world is moving toward everything tech related and we need to know how to at least use the software and understand the basics of a computer for most jobs.
Same for computer science
I agree with you there, we do need ICT, but my school overdid it a tad I think. Near enough everybody in my year group now despises the subject, but we do all know how to use a computer + the software at least.
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artful_lounger
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Business/management, up to undergrad at least. Companies don't expect you to have any specialised knowledge in that realm when applying to graduate roles, and you don't get rewarded in any way for having done those subjects. It's just a totally nothing degree for people who lack the imagination to do something more intellectually stimulating...
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Wise Goldie
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(Original post by ellaa01)
I agree with you there, we do need ICT, but my school overdid it a tad I think. Near enough everybody in my year group now despises the subject, but we do all know how to use a computer + the software at least.
i suppose in like 20 years every job maybe needs some sort of computer skills so we need to learn technoligy

i am not good at pc/computer but im good on ps4
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ellaa01
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(Original post by Wise Goldie)
i suppose in like 20 years every job maybe needs some sort of computer skills so we need to learn technoligy

i am not good at pc/computer but im good on ps4
Yeah, definitely, especially in the modern day and age where technology is continually advancing (even if that only means adding more cameras to your phone *cough cough* Apple).

My point is, however, that unless you want to pursue a career in a technology based field, an ICT course studied to GCSE level can be relatively pointless imo. At least, in my case, before having to have gone through with the ICT course for GCSE in year 10, I’d been doing ICT lessons once a week anyway as a part of the curriculum, so the basic knowledge needed for work in a career path that’s not mainly based off ICT I already had by then. So I think it was fairly pointless for my school to make us pursue it further, but again, that’s only my view on it 🤷🏻
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Wise Goldie
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(Original post by ellaa01)
Yeah, definitely, especially in the modern day and age where technology is continually advancing (even if that only means adding more cameras to your phone *cough cough* Apple).

My point is, however, that unless you want to pursue a career in a technology based field, an ICT course studied to GCSE level can be relatively pointless imo. At least, in my case, before having to have gone through with the ICT course for GCSE in year 10, I’d been doing ICT lessons once a week anyway as a part of the curriculum, so the basic knowledge needed for work in a career path that’s not mainly based off ICT I already had by then. So I think it was fairly pointless for my school to make us pursue it further, but again, that’s only my view on it 🤷🏻
your writing is always so good
looking at you
\^_^/:D


ok how i get bubbs to stop slanging lol
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Smack
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Business/management, up to undergrad at least. Companies don't expect you to have any specialised knowledge in that realm when applying to graduate roles, and you don't get rewarded in any way for having done those subjects. It's just a totally nothing degree for people who lack the imagination to do something more intellectually stimulating...
Actually, lots of businesses favour or specifically employ graduates with business (and related degrees that are typically offered at a business school) for a range of commercial and administrative positions. I certainly wouldn't classify business as a useless degree.
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nikkiblonsky
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ihatePE
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Smack)
Actually, lots of businesses favour or specifically employ graduates with business (and related degrees that are typically offered at a business school) for a range of commercial and administrative positions. I certainly wouldn't classify business as a useless degree.
Really? I'm somewhat surprised at that, I would expect that unless it's a postgrad course like an MBA, or a specialised course like HR Management that someone doing a BA/BSc Management/Business would not be notably more employable than someone else with a degree in some other academic subject from an equivalent university at the same classification, assuming similar work experience was gained during the degree.

I suppose someone doing a business degree might be statistically more likely to have that work experience by the end potentially, although that may simply be a self selection bias due to someone doing a degree in that area more actively pursuing internships etc compared to someone doing some other academic degree who might spend their summers doing other stuff (e.g. research projects or something else) or not realise the importance of work experience.
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Smack
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Really? I'm somewhat surprised at that, I would expect that unless it's a postgrad course like an MBA, or a specialised course like HR Management that someone doing a BA/BSc Management/Business would not be notably more employable than someone else with a degree in some other academic subject from an equivalent university at the same classification, assuming similar work experience was gained during the degree.

I suppose someone doing a business degree might be statistically more likely to have that work experience by the end potentially, although that may simply be a self selection bias due to someone doing a degree in that area more actively pursuing internships etc compared to someone doing some other academic degree who might spend their summers doing other stuff (e.g. research projects or something else) or not realise the importance of work experience.
Work experience is likely also an important factor as you note. But a lot of companies also aim to recruit students with business related degrees for their internships and placements too (probably the same ones that prefer them for their graduate roles). It's the same pipeline.

Think about it logically: why would it be surprising that many organisations prefer graduates with degrees relevant to the positions they are applying for? No one finds it surprising that, for example, companies would rather hire engineering grads for engineering roles.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Smack)
Work experience is likely also an important factor as you note. But a lot of companies also aim to recruit students with business related degrees for their internships and placements too (probably the same ones that prefer them for their graduate roles). It's the same pipeline.

Think about it logically: why would it be surprising that many organisations prefer graduates with degrees relevant to the positions they are applying for? No one finds it surprising that, for example, companies would rather hire engineering grads for engineering roles.
My impression has always been that for "general" business/management positions they don't really expect any prior academic knowledge; it's only in more specific areas (e.g. accounts, HR management) which they seemed to look for particular prior background. At least, from the first degree; for higher management positions my understanding is an MBA is usually necessary, but that doesn't require or assume a business background anyway.

While I could see that a business degree might give applicants some skills that employers are looking for by actively including them (e.g. project management knowledge by having a module on project management with an assignment on managing a hypothetical project) that doesn't seem to suggest that those doing other degrees couldn't gain those same skills in their academic or non-academic endeavours. I would've thought that those who had that same experience would be equivalent in the eyes of employers; maybe this assumption is wrong.
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