Sneakyshadows
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Hi everyone,

I am looking to start a second undergraduate degree in Diagnostic Radiography. I graduated from my first degree in 2011, and I can get funding from SLC and the NHS as Diagnostic Radiography is one of the exceptions for second undergraduate degree funding.

So I emailed Leeds Uni to ask if they'd consider someone in my position and background, and they asked if I have had any periods of study in the last 5 years as this is required. They haven't yet responded to my response to that.

Has anyone gone through a similar situation as me? I understand that having not studied for around 10 years I might be a little rusty at university level study, but surely the fact that I completed a degree already (and got a 2:1) should be enough to show I can do it?

Just feeling a little frustrated that I want to try and get a job in a field with a shortage but i'm being blocked by a technicality.

Thanks
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MindMax2000
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I haven't myself. However, if they require you to have studied within the last 5 years and your A Levels (or other Level 3 qualifications) don't fulfil the requirements, you could always do an Access course. It will unfortunately mean you spend a year out of university, but it also can mean you don't have spend a year doing a foundation year unncessarily. In terms of costs, it's probably the more economical choice.

Just out of interest, was your first degree a life science degree? If so, you might be able to do a course at master's or PGDIp (conversion) level (see the list here: https://www.hcpc-uk.org/education/ap...en&PageSize=15). For some of the courses, you can do it with any undergrad degree. Personally, I'd go for the conversion course or MSc, both of which last 1 year which usually means roughly £9k tuition as opposed to the 3 year tuition, unless you're keen to spend another 2 years on top at uni.
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Sneakyshadows
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
I haven't myself. However, if they require you to have studied within the last 5 years and your A Levels (or other Level 3 qualifications) don't fulfil the requirements, you could always do an Access course. It will unfortunately mean you spend a year out of university, but it also can mean you don't have spend a year doing a foundation year unncessarily. In terms of costs, it's probably the more economical choice.

Just out of interest, was your first degree a life science degree? If so, you might be able to do a course at master's or PGDIp (conversion) level (see the list here: https://www.hcpc-uk.org/education/ap...en&PageSize=15). For some of the courses, you can do it with any undergrad degree. Personally, I'd go for the conversion course or MSc, both of which last 1 year which usually means roughly £9k tuition as opposed to the 3 year tuition, unless you're keen to spend another 2 years on top at uni.
Hi MindMax2000,

Yeah I had considered an Access course, and I would definitely do it but there aren't any living cost bursaries or loans for that type of course from what i've seen, and I haven't got the money to study full-time and pay for rent, bills, etc.

My first degree was a life science degree (Molecular Genetics), but all of the postgraduate course are 2+ years (presumably because you need to do a certain number of hours on placement) and the postgraduate loan is a max of around £11k. Plus again there isn't a living cost loan for postgraduate degrees.

Feels like i'm stuck haha!
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HellomynameisNev
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Hey sneaky, nice avatar

Anyway, I think it varies from course to course and institution to institution. I'm doing Therapeutic Radiography at Sheffield Hallam and they were more than happy to accept my undergraduate degree in Chemistry, even though it was 20+ years ago.

However I was prepared to do an online A-level in biology if they had insisted on recent academic study. You can do an A-level online in less than a year.

Have you looked into Radiotherapy? You get an extra 1k bursary per year for it as well due to it being on the "hard to recruit" list
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Sneakyshadows
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(Original post by HellomynameisNev)
Hey sneaky, nice avatar

Anyway, I think it varies from course to course and institution to institution. I'm doing Therapeutic Radiography at Sheffield Hallam and they were more than happy to accept my undergraduate degree in Chemistry, even though it was 20+ years ago.

However I was prepared to do an online A-level in biology if they had insisted on recent academic study. You can do an A-level online in less than a year.

Have you looked into Radiotherapy? You get an extra 1k bursary per year for it as well due to it being on the "hard to recruit" list
Hey Hello

Thanks, I feel that the avatar tells you all about me you need to know

Hmm ok, hopefully other unis will accept my undergrad without me having to do any extra study (can't really afford that)! I'm hoping Leeds will come back to me though and give me a shot, set my heart on it now! Which website were you going to do your A-Level with? I'd do another A-Level if I need to!

I can also get that extra £1000 a month for doing Diagnostic Radiography I mainly didn't want to do Radiotherapy because I don't think I could handle it, there's a lot of cancer in my family so it would hit too close to home! But who knows, i'll look into it!
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HellomynameisNev
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(Original post by Sneakyshadows)

I can also get that extra £1000 a month for doing Diagnostic Radiography I mainly didn't want to do Radiotherapy because I don't think I could handle it, there's a lot of cancer in my family so it would hit too close to home! But who knows, i'll look into it!
Well, I will say that working with cancer patients isn't like most people expect it to be. You tell people you're in oncology and they have this image of some kind of horrific dystopian nightmare, and its not like that at all. The beauty of radiotherapy is you get to see most patients every day for several weeks, so you really get to know them and form a relationship with them. It's generally a really positive, happy place - yes you will see some things that are quite tough, but that's the same in most healthcare professions. My friends daughter is doing diagnostic radiography and her first week of her first placement she saw domestic violence victims, abused children, road traffic accidents, severely ill covid patients.....

I would encourage you to go and do work experience in a department, but you can't because of covid However, there was this webinar done last month by SHU to try and compensate a little bit for it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJIZ...ature=emb_logo

Also, I would recommend following Jo Macnamara (course lead at SHU) on twitter, she's constantly posting loads of stuff about the career.
https://twitter.com/SHURadiotherapy
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Sneakyshadows
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(Original post by HellomynameisNev)
Well, I will say that working with cancer patients isn't like most people expect it to be. You tell people you're in oncology and they have this image of some kind of horrific dystopian nightmare, and its not like that at all. The beauty of radiotherapy is you get to see most patients every day for several weeks, so you really get to know them and form a relationship with them. It's generally a really positive, happy place - yes you will see some things that are quite tough, but that's the same in most healthcare professions. My friends daughter is doing diagnostic radiography and her first week of her first placement she saw domestic violence victims, abused children, road traffic accidents, severely ill covid patients.....

I would encourage you to go and do work experience in a department, but you can't because of covid However, there was this webinar done last month by SHU to try and compensate a little bit for it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJIZ...ature=emb_logo

Also, I would recommend following Jo Macnamara (course lead at SHU) on twitter, she's constantly posting loads of stuff about the career.
https://twitter.com/SHURadiotherapy
Oh yeah I totally wasn't thinking it would be a terrible place to work, it was more that it would remind me of my family and bring back memories. But i'd imagine when you're caring for someone all of that goes away as you're focussing on looking after them and making sure they're happy and comfortable. I will definitely do some research into radiotherapy too, so that's for making me think of it

I'm hoping that much later in the year I might be able to do maybe a day or two work experience. I'm planning to apply for entry next year, so got plenty of time to do my research and possibly do work experience Thanks for webinar, i'm definitely going to watch that, looks interesting!

How are you enjoying the course?
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Sneakyshadows)
Hi MindMax2000,

Yeah I had considered an Access course, and I would definitely do it but there aren't any living cost bursaries or loans for that type of course from what i've seen, and I haven't got the money to study full-time and pay for rent, bills, etc.

My first degree was a life science degree (Molecular Genetics), but all of the postgraduate course are 2+ years (presumably because you need to do a certain number of hours on placement) and the postgraduate loan is a max of around £11k. Plus again there isn't a living cost loan for postgraduate degrees.

Feels like i'm stuck haha!
Is that after considering applying for a bursary grant from the NHS? They tend to offer those for healthcare courses
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HellomynameisNev
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(Original post by Sneakyshadows)
How are you enjoying the course?
Loving it thanks, really interesting. It's pretty full on, and on the academic side you've got a combo of physics, anatomy and then the oncology side which is both the science of cancer, but also about holistic care of cancer patients.
Then there's placement which is like a 50/50 mix of the technical side, and then the side where you're interacting with the patient.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do in the future, if you have any questions down the road feel free to PM me.
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