khaxx
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Does anyone have any examples for this? Thank you
0
reply
Wired_1800
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by khaxx)
Does anyone have any examples for this? Thank you
The 2010-2015 UK coalition government

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron–Clegg_coalition
1
reply
Wise Goldie
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by khaxx)
Does anyone have any examples for this? Thank you
im not sure about that
0
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Wired_1800)
The 2010-2015 UK coalition government

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron–Clegg_coalition
Not a splendid example. They were not especially indecisive (perhaps on lords, boundaries and Syria) but that’s because unlike European nations our coalition had a majority of about 80.

The better example would be the May government which while not a coalition was in a much more similar parliamentary position.
1
reply
Wired_1800
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Rakas21)
Not a splendid example. They were not especially indecisive (perhaps on lords, boundaries and Syria) but that’s because unlike European nations our coalition had a majority of about 80.

The better example would be the May government which while not a coalition was in a much more similar parliamentary position.
The May Government is also a good example. The DUP’s confidence and supply agreement was silly to me. It was worth £1 Billion though.
0
reply
MatureStudent37
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by khaxx)
Does anyone have any examples for this? Thank you
Belgium. Italy. Lib/Con.

It’s difficult in a coalition as many policies tie in together. What you do for example in education impacts on spending which in turn may impact in healthcare.

You also run the risk of parties getting voted on on manifestos that they can’t enact. The LibDems promised to scrap tuition fees. Great to say that when you’re not in power. Get into power in a collation and they can’t do it.

It’s not just political coalitions. Look at the allies in WW2 and WW1. They only worked when one group of leaders were forced to become subservient to another. British and French forces in WW1 couldn’t work together. It want until Foch was put in charge that they did. At that point though. Both parties outcomes were completely aligned.
1
reply
linedpaper
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Wired_1800)
The May Government is also a good example. The DUP’s confidence and supply agreement was silly to me. It was worth £1 Billion though.
The May Government was not a coalition.
0
reply
Wired_1800
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by linedpaper)
The May Government was not a coalition.
Not on paper.
0
reply
l3078
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
Be careful with some examples here. The May 2017-19 government was not a coalition, it was a confidence and supply arrangement.

If this is being considered as part of the UK Government unit, you need to use UK examples as opposed to solely international examples.

You could talk about indecision within the 2010-15 coalition, any major disagreements. Perhaps talk about the disagreement over the 2011 referendum on the voting system, which meant the Lib Dems had to compromise with an Alternative Vote referendum.
0
reply
MatureStudent37
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by l3078)
Be careful with some examples here. The May 2017-19 government was not a coalition, it was a confidence and supply arrangement.

If this is being considered as part of the UK Government unit, you need to use UK examples as opposed to solely international examples.

You could talk about indecision within the 2010-15 coalition, any major disagreements. Perhaps talk about the disagreement over the 2011 referendum on the voting system, which meant the Lib Dems had to compromise with an Alternative Vote referendum.
Valid Point.

But there’s also Belgium and Italy as prime examples of what happens with coalitions.

You only need to look at Holyrood. The Greens have one MSP. That MSP keeps the SNP in power. Result is that the SNP need the greens support so allow some pure mental bills to be passed.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now?

Anxiousness about lockdown easing (160)
4.88%
Uncertainty around my education (480)
14.64%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (369)
11.25%
Lack of purpose or motivation (459)
14%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (154)
4.7%
Impact of lockdown on physical health (199)
6.07%
Loneliness (280)
8.54%
Financial worries (114)
3.48%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (132)
4.03%
Exposure to negative news/social media (150)
4.57%
Lack of real life entertainment (180)
5.49%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (295)
9%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (307)
9.36%

Watched Threads

View All