lj7784
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Hi! I am wishing to study GCSE Chemistry alone in around 2.5 months at the end of this academic year (July-September).
I didn't take it during my real GCSE years and wish to take it now.
Do you think it's possible to self-study a GCSE in 2.5 months? NOTE: This will be the only subject I'll be studying. I have basic chemistry knowledge from Bio and Physics, as well as a few years earlier on in my education also in chemistry. I wouldn't be a TOTAL beginner!
Logistically, since I took 9 subjects in 2 years, one could argue one subject in around 10 weeks is doable? Considering those 2 years had holidays in, etc!
I'm a very committed and motivated person! I would most likely have tutoring as well to provide me with the extra assistance I may need, and I have a tutor as a very close family friend who is a Chemistry teacher.
(As far as practical work goes, I'm able to register as a private candidate with a school. I just want to know what your opinion is!)
I am able to study around 4 hours each day. This is very doable for me.

Thanks in advance.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by lj7784)
Hi! I am wishing to study GCSE Chemistry alone in around 2.5 months at the end of this academic year (July-September).
I didn't take it during my real GCSE years and wish to take it now.
Do you think it's possible to self-study a GCSE in 2.5 months? NOTE: This will be the only subject I'll be studying. I have basic chemistry knowledge from Bio and Physics, as well as a few years earlier on in my education also in chemistry. I wouldn't be a TOTAL beginner!
Logistically, since I took 9 subjects in 2 years, one could argue one subject in around 10 weeks is doable? Considering those 2 years had holidays in, etc!
I'm a very committed and motivated person! I would most likely have tutoring as well to provide me with the extra assistance I may need, and I have a tutor as a very close family friend who is a Chemistry teacher.
(As far as practical work goes, I'm able to register as a private candidate with a school. I just want to know what your opinion is!)
I am able to study around 4 hours each day. This is very doable for me.

Thanks in advance.
Online colleges are quoting 120 hours for the GCSE. Chemistry at GCSE level isn't particularly taxing, so I wouldn't be that surprised that you would be able to speed through the whole thing in less time. Having said that, online colleges say you can get it within 6 months, which is a bit long for my liking.

I go by a 60 hour week rota, so I should be able to do the whole thing within 2 weeks, but it depends on how your course is designed and how you study.

Presuming you're only studying 5 days a week, and you do 4 hours each day (why would you?), then you should be able to do it in 6 weeks.

If you do this, do try to get a 9. I am guessing you would only want to do this once, and you have the time to spare, so might as well go all out on it.
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S.K.M
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I would say if you really want to do it and feel as though you can do it and stay motivated, then do it. There is numerous apps/websites/tutoring out there for you to go to. You can always ask me for help as well I am currently taking Gcse AQA Chemistry (Triple science) and would be happy to help. I do recommend that if you do go for it and begin to lose your motivation, see if anyone you know is willing to help you stay motivated or even help you stay on track. Some good things I use for Chemistry is:
-get.atomi (videos and quizzes on a website)
-freesciencelessons (youtube channel)

Hope this helps
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lj7784
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Online colleges are quoting 120 hours for the GCSE. Chemistry at GCSE level isn't particularly taxing, so I wouldn't be that surprised that you would be able to speed through the whole thing in less time. Having said that, online colleges say you can get it within 6 months, which is a bit long for my liking.

I go by a 60 hour week rota, so I should be able to do the whole thing within 2 weeks, but it depends on how your course is designed and how you study.

Presuming you're only studying 5 days a week, and you do 4 hours each day (why would you?), then you should be able to do it in 6 weeks.

If you do this, do try to get a 9. I am guessing you would only want to do this once, and you have the time to spare, so might as well go all out on it.
Very helpful!
When you say 'why would you?' - I am guessing you mean I should do more than 4hrs/day? It's over Summer and I'm completely free, would you suggest doing more?
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lj7784
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(Original post by S.K.M)
I would say if you really want to do it and feel as though you can do it and stay motivated, then do it. There is numerous apps/websites/tutoring out there for you to go to. You can always ask me for help as well I am currently taking Gcse AQA Chemistry (Triple science) and would be happy to help. I do recommend that if you do go for it and begin to lose your motivation, see if anyone you know is willing to help you stay motivated or even help you stay on track. Some good things I use for Chemistry is:
-get.atomi (videos and quizzes on a website)
-freesciencelessons (youtube channel)

Hope this helps
Thank you! That was a really helpful, and very motivating response.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by lj7784)
Very helpful!
When you say 'why would you?' - I am guessing you mean I should do more than 4hrs/day? It's over Summer and I'm completely free, would you suggest doing more?
Pretty much. I'm usually studying material that's harder than GCSE and I spend roughly 10 hours a day on it without burning out (I chill over parts of the weekend).
To me, unless it dents your ability to actively recall the material for a test or exam, 4 hours a day or less is kind of slacking a bit in my book. I also have a habit of doing things intensively as opposed to habitually. I find that I'm more productive and focused that way.

I also would rather get it done and out of the way.
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lj7784
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Pretty much. I'm usually studying material that's harder than GCSE and I spend roughly 10 hours a day on it without burning out (I chill over parts of the weekend).
To me, unless it dents your ability to actively recall the material for a test or exam, 4 hours a day or less is kind of slacking a bit in my book. I also have a habit of doing things intensively as opposed to habitually. I find that I'm more productive and focused that way.

I also would rather get it done and out of the way.
Wow! I will take what you said into consideration! See, I was thinking of working weekends. Now, coming to think of it, working more on the weekdays and having the weekends to relax may be a lot less stressful.
Thank you for the advice!
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