Calorie deficit

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bgwti55
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Can someone please explain to me a calorie deficit?
I understand it’s burning more than you consume however if I’m in a deficit and eating 1400 calories a day, do I have to burn more than 1400 calories in an exercise?
I go on morning walks, 10k steps, and lose between 500-700 sometimes
I’m 22, a female, 5ft5 and weigh 10st 6 lbs.
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V℮rsions
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"however if I’m in a deficit and eating 1400 calories a day, do I have to burn more than 1400 calories in an exercise?"

No, you should be in a deficit already, as you burn more than that being idol, so exercise just increases the weight loss and burns even more calories - which are taken from other sources, such as fat and then muscle. If you burned all your intake calories during exercise then you'd have no energy left for you body to function (i.e. recycling cells, growth, temperature regulation).
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npic9
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I’m currently on one now actually but the exercising is just extra calories being burnt, I recommend getting an app that tells you how many KM and calories you have burnt on your walks/exercise ( I use Samsung health )
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rosy_posy
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Surely, doing a calorie deficit isn't healthy :/
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V℮rsions
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(Original post by gem2004)
Surely, doing a calorie deficit isn't healthy :/
If you have excess fat it burns that as fuel to make up for the deficit, thats how you lose weight :yy:
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by gem2004)
Surely, doing a calorie deficit isn't healthy :/
Explain.
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rosy_posy
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
If you have excess fat it burns that as fuel to make up for the deficit, thats how you lose weight :yy:
(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
Explain.
It can lead to eating disorders, such as Anorexia and Bulimia: https://behavioralnutrition.org/conn...ing-disorders/
Calorie deficits also lead to poor health with or without an eating disorder: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...triction-risks

You may see restricting calories as being 'worth it' despite the health risks, but the body and mind need adequate amounts of food and water to function optimally. It is not uncommon for people with eating disorders to faint and even end up being hospitalised because their body is so starved of the calories and nutrients it needs.
A balanced diet and active lifestyle without strictly controlling calorie intake is a healthier option.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by gem2004)
It can lead to eating disorders, such as Anorexia and Bulimia: https://behavioralnutrition.org/conn...ing-disorders/
Calorie deficits also lead to poor health with or without an eating disorder: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...triction-risks

You may see restricting calories as being 'worth it' despite the health risks, but the body and mind need adequate amounts of food and water to function optimally. It is not uncommon for people with eating disorders to faint and even end up being hospitalised because their body is so starved of the calories and nutrients it needs.
A balanced diet and active lifestyle without strictly controlling calorie intake is a healthier option.
It can lead to doesn't mean it will for sure, with proper knowledge, caloric defict will not lead to eating disorders and your second link talks about risks associated with extreme deficits and trying to lose weight when you don't need to, again things that can be avoided with proper knowledge.

What would you tell an obese person to do?
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rosy_posy
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
1 It can lead to doesn't mean it will for sure, with proper knowledge, caloric defict will not lead to eating disorders and your second link talks about risks associated with extreme deficits and trying to lose weight when you don't need to, again things that can be avoided with proper knowledge.

2 What would you tell an obese person to do?
1 doesn't mean it's healthy though 🙃
2 I wouldn't tell them to do anything, unless they were a close friend or family member and they had specifically asked me to give them advice on leading a healthy life.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by gem2004)
1 doesn't mean it's healthy though 🙃
2 I wouldn't tell them to do anything, unless they were a close friend or family member and they had specifically asked me to give them advice on leading a healthy life.
1. If someone is overweight, the best thing they can do for the health risks associated with that is to lose weight.
2. Okay thats dodging the question lets say a close friend asked you I am obese what should I do to be healthy?
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rosy_posy
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
1. If someone is overweight, the best thing they can do for the health risks associated with that is to lose weight.
2. Okay thats dodging the question lets say a close friend asked you I am obese what should I do to be healthy?
1. If they choose to lose weight it shouldn't be through a calorie deficit, for reasons I have already stated. There are other ways of losing weight that are better for mental and physical health (eating balanced diet, exercising routinely, etc.)
2. I would just ask them what they eat and how often they exercise. Then I would suggest solutions if they asked me to, but I wouldn't force them to do anything as ultimately it's up to them.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by gem2004)
1. If they choose to lose weight it shouldn't be through a calorie deficit, for reasons I have already stated. There are other ways of losing weight that are better for mental and physical health (eating balanced diet, exercising routinely, etc.)
2. I would just ask them what they eat and how often they exercise. Then I would suggest solutions if they asked me to, but I wouldn't force them to do anything as ultimately it's up to them.
1. Caloric deficit is the only way to lose weight. Your body will not lose weight if you eat at maintenance.
2. Your solutions if they worked would bring upon a caloric deficit directly if they were to work,
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V℮rsions
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(Original post by gem2004)
It can lead to eating disorders, such as Anorexia and Bulimia: https://behavioralnutrition.org/conn...ing-disorders/
Calorie deficits also lead to poor health with or without an eating disorder: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...triction-risks

You may see restricting calories as being 'worth it' despite the health risks, but the body and mind need adequate amounts of food and water to function optimally. It is not uncommon for people with eating disorders to faint and even end up being hospitalised because their body is so starved of the calories and nutrients it needs.
A balanced diet and active lifestyle without strictly controlling calorie intake is a healthier option.
Yeah, but you can say the same for anything. Considering how rare eating disorders actually are, it's not really a fair point to make. Especially since ED's have now been found to have somewhat links to genetics, and media being lesser in the equation. In fact, restriction as part of a healthy lifestyle can be quite healthy.
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DFGH1
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(Original post by gem2004)
1. If they choose to lose weight it shouldn't be through a calorie deficit, for reasons I have already stated. There are other ways of losing weight that are better for mental and physical health (eating balanced diet, exercising routinely, etc.)
2. I would just ask them what they eat and how often they exercise. Then I would suggest solutions if they asked me to, but I wouldn't force them to do anything as ultimately it's up to them.
I think you don't know how to achieve a calorie deficit if u think its unhealthy.
1. its the only way to lose weight, laws of thermodynamics
2. balanced diet and exercise help contribute to a calorie deficit
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aaaaaaaa32
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(Original post by gem2004)
1. If they choose to lose weight it shouldn't be through a calorie deficit, for reasons I have already stated. There are other ways of losing weight that are better for mental and physical health (eating balanced diet, exercising routinely, etc.)
2. I would just ask them what they eat and how often they exercise. Then I would suggest solutions if they asked me to, but I wouldn't force them to do anything as ultimately it's up to them.
I think that it is healthy as long as the person has a good sense of mental wellbeing and is seeking to monitor their calorie intake reasonably and for the right reasons. If not, I think that's when it becomes unhealthy as their relationship with their food and their body is guided by how many calories they've had. If they don't seem mentally stable enough then yes, I agree that it would be wiser to recommend other options such as eating a more balanced diet or uptaking a sport
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linedpaper
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(Original post by gem2004)
It can lead to eating disorders, such as Anorexia and Bulimia: https://behavioralnutrition.org/conn...ing-disorders/
Calorie deficits also lead to poor health with or without an eating disorder: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...triction-risks

You may see restricting calories as being 'worth it' despite the health risks, but the body and mind need adequate amounts of food and water to function optimally. It is not uncommon for people with eating disorders to faint and even end up being hospitalised because their body is so starved of the calories and nutrients it needs.
A balanced diet and active lifestyle without strictly controlling calorie intake is a healthier option.
You clearly know nothing about this.
Being in a calorie deficit is the only way to lose weight. It helps people to count so they know they stay in deficit. And in most people it does not lead to an eating disorder- being obese in itself could be a sign you have an eating disorder. In deficit you still eat, and you still function, but your body uses other excess storage for energy. It’s advised you drink plenty of water whilst losing weight as well as you can mistake being thirsty for being hungry.
It’s not healthy to be obese or overweight.
(Original post by gem2004)
1. If they choose to lose weight it shouldn't be through a calorie deficit, for reasons I have already stated. There are other ways of losing weight that are better for mental and physical health (eating balanced diet, exercising routinely, etc.)
Again, the only way to lose weight is through a calorie deficit. If you wanted to lose weight but didn’t have a calorie deficit you simply wouldn’t lose weight... you can’t lose weight. Eating a balanced diet and cutting out snacks, as well as exercising are things that put you in, and help you stay in, a calorie deficit.
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DFGH1
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(Original post by bgwti55)
Can someone please explain to me a calorie deficit?
I understand it’s burning more than you consume however if I’m in a deficit and eating 1400 calories a day, do I have to burn more than 1400 calories in an exercise?
I go on morning walks, 10k steps, and lose between 500-700 sometimes
I’m 22, a female, 5ft5 and weigh 10st 6 lbs.
its almost impossible to burn that many calories without passing out or worse and you don't need to as taking in1400 calories is already a deficit from your maintenance and as you have maintained this through diet, you don't actually need exercise, but it helps. Basically, your body has metabolic processes ( eg respiration etc ) which naturally burns calories and to maintain weight, the average woman needs like 2100 calories as there body burns about the same amount throughout the day, hence no growth but no loss. if you want to lose weight your calorie intake < calorie outtake which can be done by taking about 400/500 calories off your maintenance calories either by eating less or burning the calories through exercise or both. You can find an estimate of maintenance calories by a TDEE calculator online but it isn't accurate.
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rosy_posy
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Reducing caloric intake ≠ calorie deficit
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linedpaper
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(Original post by gem2004)
Reducing caloric intake ≠ calorie deficit
Are you thick? Unless you eat above your maintenance calories every day then reduce your intake and eat slightly above or on your maintenance then yes, you’re not in a calorie deficit. But if you eat below your maintenance then yes, you are in a calorie deficit as you are not eating the amount of calories that allows your body to maintain your weight, instead it will use other storage sources and you will lose weight.

Please stop trying to ‘prove’ your point that no one should be in a calorie deficit as it causes eating disorders, and that a balanced diet and exercise cause you to lose weight without a calorie deficit. Balanced diet and exercise can help you with a calorie deficit and are recommended but if you eat at maintenance you won’t actually lose any weight.
I don’t know if you have ever tried to lose weight from being overweight but if you have you will know that the calorie deficit is how you lose it.
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DFGH1
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(Original post by gem2004)
Reducing caloric intake ≠ calorie deficit
of course if u reduce it so its not below outtake/ maintenance calories it wont be a deficit, that's like saying reducing it by 10 calories from 3000 will help.
this is how were saying you get a deficit
1. reducing calorie intake significantly below maintenance through diet
2. increasing calorie outtake significantly through exercise
3. reducing calorie intake through diet and increasing calorie outtake through exercise

also people like you confuse diet and make it hard for people. cutting isn't hard there are simple scientific principle of energy in needs to be less than energy out and your complicating it.
Last edited by DFGH1; 1 month ago
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