ahmedpatel8888
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Hey guys, I have just been given my first essay in public law and I'm not sure how to structure it. The question is a statement on how delegated legislation threatens parliamentary sovereignty and rule of law. I need to explain and evaluate this whilst looking at parliamentary controls. I'm not sure what the structure is supposed to be like. I've started off with defining the key principles but where do I go from there? How many arguments do I need on both sides before coming to a conclusion? Any advice is appreciated! Thank you!!
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Rootkit77
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first of all you need to explore the correlation between the parliament and legislation, how has this relationship shaped in the past. having done that you'll acknowledge the emerging delagated legislation and how it affects the said connection. remember to cover the reasons for delegated legislation.
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ahmedpatel8888
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(Original post by Rootkit77)
first of all you need to explore the correlation between the parliament and legislation, how has this relationship shaped in the past. having done that you'll acknowledge the emerging delagated legislation and how it affects the said connection. remember to cover the reasons for delegated legislation.
thank you for your reply. How many arguments would I need on the opposing sides?
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Joleee
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i'll take a wise guess here that you don't know the structure and the arguments because you haven't done your research yet. you really have to do that first - read some articles. what are the issues with delegated legislation(?). who says it threatens parliamentary sovereignty and rule of law and do you agree with them? who says it doesn't threaten because there are controls(?). have you written an essay at uni yet? there isn't a magic number as to how many arguments you make. you just have to explore the issues, create an argument for why you agree/disagree with the statement in the question, explore the counter argument and plug any potential holes in your argument. in this case you'd potentially have threatening, non-threatening, potentially threatening, conclusion.
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ahmedpatel8888
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(Original post by Joleee)
i'll take a wise guess here that you don't know the structure and the arguments because you haven't done your research yet. you really have to do that first - read some articles. what are the issues with delegated legislation(?). who says it threatens parliamentary sovereignty and rule of law and do you agree with them? who says it doesn't threaten because there are controls(?). have you written an essay at uni yet? there isn't a magic number as to how many arguments you make. you just have to explore the issues, create an argument for why you agree/disagree with the statement in the question, explore the counter argument and plug any potential holes in your argument. in this case you'd potentially have threatening, non-threatening, potentially threatening, conclusion.
Thank you so much for your reply! I have written essays for problem questions but not essay questions where you have to argue both sides. We have a word limit of 2000 and I'm just stuck as to how I go about this. There are two constitutional principles in question: parliamentary sovereignty and rule of law. Would you say the structure is something like: Define in intro say what essay is about, then argument agreeing with statement regarding PS then do I need to counter argue that specific point or just bring a completely separate argument against. Then same for RoL. Then conclusion? Or do I need more than one argument for each. Sorry I am just so confused.
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