Sarah Everard: Missing 33-year old in South London

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DSilva
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Occitanie)
No, it has not yet been confirmed. I'm basing it on the fact that she vanished from Poynders Road with no other CCTV footage of her other than from a doorbell camera, meaning they couldn't piece together her movements (bn foot). The fact that this PC's car has been impounded by investigators, that he's now being questioned on suspicion of murder.

I recall the Chris Halliwell (a taxi driver) murders and how he had picked up one of his victims as she left a club/bar. CCTV had followed her down a street until she had vanished.

I don't think they knew eachother, I think that the PC must have stopped her (either in uniform or not), offered her a lift and drove off.
It's astonishing he was a serving Met officer. There surely must have been warning signs as to his character.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by DSilva)
It's astonishing he was a serving Met officer. There surely must have been warning signs as to his character.
Without a doubt, but some people are able to hide that part of themselves.

I think we'll get some more news later on this evening as the forensic teams continue their investigations.

I can't begin to imagine how her family feel. I have felt sick to my teeth since Thursday last week.
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londonmyst
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Hopefully this suspicious disappearance won't be a repeat of the Claudia Lawrence situation.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Hopefully this suspicious disappearance won't be a repeat of the Claudia Lawrence situation.
The police didn't know she'd been killed for sure for a long time, whereas they are evidently already sure of that in this case.

Encouraging to see men tweeting this evening about how they can make the streets safer for women. So often these things turn into a partial blame game about how women need to be more careful, it's our fault for being provocative or too willing to be out at night on our own, etc.
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DSilva
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Police have found a body. Horrific news.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by DSilva)
Police have found a body. Horrific news.
For a father-of-two and police officer to abduct a woman from London, drive her to Kent, kill her and bury her in the woods... unfathomable

How can you live with that? Let alone carry out such an act.
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rockrunride
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(Original post by Occitanie)
For a father-of-two and police officer to abduct a woman from London, drive her to Kent, kill her and bury her in the woods... unfathomable

How can you live with that? Let alone carry out such an act.
It really is unspeakably bad. The calculation that must have gone into it. No words really.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by rockrunride)
It really is unspeakably bad. The calculation that must have gone into it. No words really.
Spot on, it's as you put it, the 'calculation' and opportunistic premeditation that boggles the mind the most. Luckily, it looks like the culprit has been caught, because this has all the marks of serial killer.
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ScouseEmma28
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This truly is awful beyond comprehension. It’s just so difficult to grasp what may have happened. Whether he was in plain clothes or not, I can only assume at this stage she didn’t voluntarily enter the car. Like a previous poster, I too assumed it maybe have been an RTC, in which he panicked and wanted to hide her body - it would explain (IF the remains turn out to be her own), why she was found in woodlands in Ashford near his home. If not an RTC, and the remains are hers, then I would find it even more disturbing how he would drive so far away to dispose of her body. Just shocking...
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DSilva
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(Original post by Occitanie)
For a father-of-two and police officer to abduct a woman from London, drive her to Kent, kill her and bury her in the woods... unfathomable

How can you live with that? Let alone carry out such an act.
I don't know. It's unspeakably evil. Poor girl.

It must be terrifying to be a woman and have to walk alone at night. It shouldn't be that way.
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username5252758
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BBC reporting that human remains have been found. Trajectory of the news reports over the last 24 hours suggests that this was the probable outcome.
Last edited by username5252758; 1 month ago
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sr90
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Encouraging to see men tweeting this evening about how they can make the streets safer for women. So often these things turn into a partial blame game about how women need to be more careful, it's our fault for being provocative or too willing to be out at night on our own, etc.
I read through that and definitely learnt a few things from it. It's always a real eye opener for me that women have to take so many precautions over things I don't blink twice over.

When I was at uni I worked in retail, very female dominated including a lot of young girls in their first job. I was one of the department supervisors often on the closing shift and trying to get everyone home safely was a constant worry. Especially in winter or on Thursdays when we closed at 8pm. I lost count of how many times I had to wait behind with someone until their lift arrived or walk them to the bus/train station because they didn't feel safe. It was absolutely horrifying that they could feel like this by simply leaving their workplace.
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rockrunride
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(Original post by sr90)
I read through that and definitely learnt a few things from it. It's always a real eye opener for me that women have to take so many precautions over things I don't blink twice over.

When I was at uni I worked in retail, very female dominated including a lot of young girls in their first job. I was one of the department supervisors often on the closing shift and trying to get everyone home safely was a constant worry. Especially in winter or on Thursdays when we closed at 8pm. I lost count of how many times I had to wait behind with someone until their lift arrived or walk them to the bus/train station because they didn't feel safe. It was absolutely horrifying that they could feel like this by simply leaving their workplace.
It's pretty bad and definitely needs a big effort to change but I guess understandable that people don't know the struggles of the opposite gender.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by sr90)
I read through that and definitely learnt a few things from it. It's always a real eye opener for me that women have to take so many precautions over things I don't blink twice over.

When I was at uni I worked in retail, very female dominated including a lot of young girls in their first job. I was one of the department supervisors often on the closing shift and trying to get everyone home safely was a constant worry. Especially in winter or on Thursdays when we closed at 8pm. I lost count of how many times I had to wait behind with someone until their lift arrived or walk them to the bus/train station because they didn't feel safe. It was absolutely horrifying that they could feel like this by simply leaving their workplace.
Women are less risk averse than when I was young.

Far fewer women are attacked down dark alleys and as a result more women walk or run alone in remote locations.

There has been a huge change in criminal behaviour since DNA testing came in. Basically before the Pitchfork case in 1986, the modus operandi of any sex attacker was based on escape. If the attacker was neither caught nor identified at the scene, the crime was virtually insoluble.

The Yorkshire Ripper was only caught at the scene immediately prior to an attack because he had false number plates.

Now sex attackers assume they will be identifiable and their modus operandi is geared around creating an ambiguity. The last thing an attacker wants is to commit a crime in a location that no jury would believe was the location of a lovers’ tryst.
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rockrunride
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Women are less risk averse than when I was young.

Far fewer women are attacked down dark alleys and as a result more women walk or run alone in remote locations.

There has been a huge change in criminal behaviour since DNA testing came in. Basically before the Pitchfork case in 1986, the modus operandi of any sex attacker was based on escape. If the attacker was neither caught nor identified at the scene, the crime was virtually insoluble.

The Yorkshire Ripper was only caught at the scene immediately prior to an attack because he had false number plates.

Now sex attackers assume they will be identifiable and their modus operandi is geared around creating an ambiguity. The last thing an attacker wants is to commit a crime in a location that no jury would believe was the location of a lovers’ tryst.
I guess this would make this case an outlier in that regard then?

It seems that for better or worse now there are less SA convictions than there used to be. Partly down to the changing nature of the act and the ensuing difficulty of pinning mens rea beyond reasonable doubt. It is important that stats on convictions aren't interpreted as less crime being committed over more men getting away with it and vice versa.
Last edited by rockrunride; 1 month ago
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by rockrunride)
I guess this would make this case an outlier in that regard then?

It seems that for better or worse now there are less SA convictions than there used to be. Partly down to the changing nature of the act and the ensuing difficulty of pinning mens rea beyond reasonable doubt.
We will have to see. If this was a random stranger, the police managed to conduct an elimination exercise of all the other random strangers logged in the vicinity, extremely quickly.

If it is a random stranger, I think it is an outlier. Moreover, it is an outlier in that the suspect is knowledgeable. A lot of the “dark alley” attackers caught in recent years have been recent migrants and I don’t think that is coincidental. They are either unfamiliar with U.K. police abilities to identify suspects or believe they are not in, and won’t in the future be in, a U.K. database.
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username5252758
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(Original post by sr90)
It was absolutely horrifying that they could feel like this by simply leaving their workplace.
Sadly their concerns are not unwarranted. A colleague of mine was followed a couple of months ago after she finished a late shift. He drove along in his car making sexual remarks and asking if she wanted to come home with him. He only drove off after she approached a couple walking the opposite direction. He may have just been a nasty creep who didn't intend her physical harm, but it is immaterial because she was so fearful of what may have happened. Thankfully she now gets a taxi paid for.

I've heard so many similar stories over the years to know that women are entirely justified for feeling worried about being out alone at night.
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StarLinyx
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I am deeply saddened and distraught on hearing the current reports regarding the missing person Sarah Everard from South London, and that she may have been murdered by a Met police officer. This young lady was said to be an extremely polite, kind, caring and successful professional, and it is unthinkable that anyone would want to harm her. A graduate from Durham University, and well placed in a career in marketing, I just can't come to terms with this apparant senseless and callous act.
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The RAR
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I am genuinely really shocked. Like how can a police officer, a police officer out of all people just do something like this? Now if it was an ex-boyfriend of hers or something I wouldn't be THAT surprised but seems like the officer had no relations with her, which makes this very shocking.
I was shocked that the officer was involved in her disappearance and even more shocked he could have murdered her. Now if this event was random and they didn't know each other I really don't know what to say. How are you meant to stay safe out there when there are POLICE roaming the streets wanting to hurt you? It's hella ****ed up
Last edited by The RAR; 1 month ago
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Napp
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A truly heinous act, unfortunately one that isnt nearly rare enough though. As much as it pains me to point out, the only thing that makes this example particularly newsworthy is the fact the poor woman was a middle class lady and the villain here was a ranking police officer. Women suffer far to much in this regard from vermin who think they have the right to murder someone for no reason what so ever.
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