Law essay questions. Bit random but bear with me...

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Bluehorn1990
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I'm nearly at the end of my undergrad (not a law degree). I am a mature student. For about 10 years I've constantly been drawn to studying law, but have lacked confidence in my ability to keep up with the reading.
However, be it because of covid or simply maturity, I have found myself really wanting to give this a go!
But, I want to practice first. I don't want to commit financially unless I know, in myself, I can do this.
So, to help build my confidence, I'm reading law books recommended by my preferred university choice.
What I'd really like to do, however, is know example essay questions (cases, debates, etc) that people got in their first and/or second year. I'm not asking for your essays, just the question hat your university gave to you, so that I can put my reading and research into written word...i can't get them marked, but that's not really the point. This is just something that I really feel would benefit me to give a go over the next so many months.
So would people be happy to share an example question you had?
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sinmin
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Hello, you're actually asking for quite a lot so just as an intro to studying law, you're generally going to come across two types of questions; a) problem questions, and b) essay based questions.

The way problem questions work is you'll get a hypothetical "case study" (I'm sure you've come across case studies in your previous studies, but law case studies usually come a bit denser with a lot of moving parts). You are then to apply the relevant rules to the various incidents and "advise" a party in the story. I think you'll struggle to attempt this because you'd need to *know* a whole semester or year's worth of content to know WHAT the issues are and the various exceptions that may apply, so in one question it's possible that you would come across content covered in Week 1 AND week 10. There's no harm in trying, but don't be discouraged if you're unable to tackle them.

Essay questions are more open-ended and probably more suited to self-study. Questions would be asking you to argue for or against a certain point of law, so it's quite specific and you can concentrate on reading in depth rather than breadth like you'd need for the problem question. In my opinion (take that with a grain of salt), essay questions are definitely more fun and intellectually challenging. As you're not doing this for an incoming exam season, you can even pick and choose which topics to find questions for that interest you particularly.

There's also the fact that there are many discrete fields of law that don't always have a lot of overlap. Sometimes, you'd even need to have a background in one to properly understand another (e.g.: to understand Land Law, you'd need some background in Contract and Tort, and a bit of Equity as well).

My suggestion is to pick a particular subject that is often part of a 1st year curriculum. That way you won't get overwhelmed and can really dig deep to see whether law is for you. The subjects that come to mind are: Contract Law, Tort Law, Criminal Law, and Constitutional Law. My personal favourite is Contract, and I'm actually writing a dissertation relating to the principles behind it at the moment.

Here are a few example questions:
‘Despite the introduction of the Consumer Rights Act 2015, consumer protection is still inadequate under English contract law.’ Discuss.

‘The offer and acceptance approach to agreement is overly rigid and does not reflect the reality of contract making.’ Discuss.

Here is an example of a general essay about the Unfair Contract Terms Act so you can see what kind of material is discussed and how in law:
https://www.lawteacher.net/free-law-...-terms-act.php

Lawteacher is a great way to see examples and benchmarks for problem questions AND essays for all the law subjects, whichever interests you the most. Just be sure not to plagiarise from it if and when you actually do study law; not mentioning the ethics and risks involved, it's just not a good way to get good grades as the quality is fairly average (not bad) but it will look even worse when copied and pasted as it often doesn't perfectly fit the questions you actually get.

Good luck!
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econ.person
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Try studocu. Lots of past papers on there where you’ll find law question. Has occasional paywalls.

Btw you should consider doing a GDL after you graduate instead of a senior status LLB. It’s faster and “cheaper”. You could also consider a qualifying MA like at the university of law.
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Joleee
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may i ask you why you want to study law? like is it for personal enjoyment? just checking as there are a lot of misconceptions about studying a law degree, namely that it teaches you legal practise or how law works in real life (it doesn't) and that it leads to a career as a solicitor/barrister (not necessarily and you don't need a law degree to become one).

i don't have access to a laptop to look up essay questions atm but you either have problem questions or 'discuss' style. if it's a problem question you're given a scenario and you have to unpack the legal issues and argue your way to a conclusion. if it's a 'discuss' question, at my uni anyway you are given a quote from either a journal article or a judgment and have to unpack everything it's asking you (basically do you agree with the quote or not); altho i have seen in TSR law study help forum that at other schools they just tell you what the question is asking and you don't have to figure it out yourself. have you looked at examples in law study help?

tbh tho i realise you hope practising writing a law essay is going to help you or give you some insight, but it won't because you can't practise being a law student without instruction from a university as you won't know what to look for as issues in the question, or where to find sources, or what a good law essay makes. textbooks as sources are a small part of it - if it's worth using at all - because textbooks are often descriptive of law but not critical of it and analyse law like academic journal articles do, which is what you really need. you also have to compile data from judgments, government reports, parliamentary reports, Hansard, jurisprudence, and law from other jurisdictions to name a few (which is why law is famous for lots of reading). not even law students know how to do this at first without studying how to write a law essay and getting feedback; so you can practise for fun, but you might just be practicing how to write a poor essay.

maybe what you could do tho, besides poking through the law study help forum here, is try to find dissertations online and see how an essay is written and what sources they use. i would make a note of looking up something on constitutional law, jurisprudence and maybe equity or criminal law as they're tackled in different ways. you could also pick up a law revision guide if you want to see what a problem question generally looks like.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by Bluehorn1990)
I'm nearly at the end of my undergrad (not a law degree). I am a mature student. For about 10 years I've constantly been drawn to studying law, but have lacked confidence in my ability to keep up with the reading.
However, be it because of covid or simply maturity, I have found myself really wanting to give this a go!
But, I want to practice first. I don't want to commit financially unless I know, in myself, I can do this.
So, to help build my confidence, I'm reading law books recommended by my preferred university choice.
What I'd really like to do, however, is know example essay questions (cases, debates, etc) that people got in their first and/or second year. I'm not asking for your essays, just the question hat your university gave to you, so that I can put my reading and research into written word...i can't get them marked, but that's not really the point. This is just something that I really feel would benefit me to give a go over the next so many months.
So would people be happy to share an example question you had?
I honestly don't know why people are second-guessing you. I had a lot of uncertainty about the material covered in a law degree and what the essays looked like. It would've been great to get some input from existing law students. I'll remind myself to PM you a few things tonight.
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The University of Law Students
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Mature student here too! Good on you for exploring the subject first.

I'm studying with the University of Law now- on the MA Law course (because my first degree wasn't law either). I chose the MA so that I could get funding through Student Finance England (loan) but you can do other routes too.

I can't give you exact questions because they are property of the University of Law but I can give you general ideas so you can have a look into the subjects. So here is an example from each area that I have studied:

Criminal law: Can consent be a defence to common assault and what amendments could be made to the law?
Equity: Critically evaluate the principle of the 'imperfect gift'
EU law: What are the rights of entry and residence to the EU states and how can they expel people?
Land law: What are the rules regarding third party rights and their enforceability?
Public law: Critically evaluate the UK's separation of powers.
Tort: Explain when a duty of care may arise during a sporting event.
Contract: What is the current law regarding the modification of contracts?

Each question would ordinarily be given with quotes or scenarios so that you have more to work off but I can't give you all of those details but I hope the main ideas help. Law is really varied and there are so many interests that can be found within it. I started my course believing that I wanted to go into family law but I have found company law really interesting (which has come up as part of wider reading).

I've been doing my MA online as I have other commitments and have to say I've really enjoyed it.

All the best with exploring the subjects. Hope that helps a bit.

Nic
Student Ambassador- University of Law
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Mikos
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Have a look at this. This is a popular type of question you might encounter on a law degree:
https://mcbridesguides.com/2015/01/0...lem-questions/
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Catherine1973
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Senior status law here!

You can see loads of typical questions and how to answer in the concentrate q&a range. They do for most topics then split into questions for each area of that course.
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Bluehorn1990
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
I honestly don't know why people are second-guessing you. I had a lot of uncertainty about the material covered in a law degree and what the essays looked like. It would've been great to get some input from existing law students. I'll remind myself to PM you a few things tonight.
Thank you for being kind!!
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Bluehorn1990
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Hi everyone. thank you all so much for your examples and ideas. I thoroughly appreciate it! I'm doing some free summary courses on law at the moment, via the OU, just as something to pass the time. I thoroughly look forward to delving into more reading and practices.

Lastly, I've heard that your assignment lengths aren't that long? People have told me they usually have to write 1500-2500 words? My degree, which is biology-based (though not actually biology) regularly asks for 4000 words and has done since year 1!!
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The University of Law Students
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Hi there,

Really good to hear you are being so proactive with doing the free summary course online.

Just to give you some feedback in terms of assignments lenghts within a law degree (have done both a GDL and currently a LPC) generally the assigments are around 1500 -2000 words. However, most legal course expected you to complete 2 assigments per week at this length. There are some assisgments or task that can be longer and there are research reports which can go up to as much as 7,500 words.

What I found whilst law law it not about the length of your answer but your ability to be able to answer the question asked concisely and accurately. This seems to be a skill that would stand you in good stead whilst studying a law related degree.

Hopefully this gives you a bit more clarity,

Tam
Student Ambassador- University of Law
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Bluehorn1990
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(Original post by The University of Law Students)
Hi there,

Really good to hear you are being so proactive with doing the free summary course online.

Just to give you some feedback in terms of assignments lenghts within a law degree (have done both a GDL and currently a LPC) generally the assigments are around 1500 -2000 words. However, most legal course expected you to complete 2 assigments per week at this length. There are some assisgments or task that can be longer and there are research reports which can go up to as much as 7,500 words.

What I found whilst law law it not about the length of your answer but your ability to be able to answer the question asked concisely and accurately. This seems to be a skill that would stand you in good stead whilst studying a law related degree.

Hopefully this gives you a bit more clarity,

Tam
Student Ambassador- University of Law
Thank you so much for your information. I'm incredibly appreciative!
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