KEH09
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Hi, I am a 45 year old Healthcare Practitioner considering taking GAMSAT exams for entry into Medicine. I also have three children. I am currently going round in circles considering whether or not going in this direction is doable for someone in my positon. Would love some replies from anyone in a similar situation. TIA
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becausethenight
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:hi:
The thread you posted in was 10 years old so I've made a shiny new one for you where hopefully you'll get some good replies.
ecolier, GANFYD, Democracy and nexttime are all doctors who might be able to help. I know there was a 'medicine at 35+' thread doing the rounds a few months ago which might be helpful but I can't find it, so one of them might be able to link that too.
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ecolier
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(Original post by KEH09)
Hi, I am a 45 year old Healthcare Practitioner considering taking GAMSAT exams for entry into Medicine. I also have three children. I am currently going round in circles considering whether or not going in this direction is doable for someone in my positon. Would love some replies from anyone in a similar situation. TIA
There won't be many people in your circumstances... the problem with doing medicine isn't the course itself, it's being a junior doctor. As said, there are much more applicants in their 30s, maybe even early 40s.

If you think you are OK with doing 13 hour long day / night shifts, potentislly being asked to move to another region for training, and being treated like dirt in your 50s, then why not. But this is something that's relatively easy as a single person in their 20s, much harder for someone later in life with children and connections.
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nexttime
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(Original post by KEH09)
Hi, I am a 45 year old Healthcare Practitioner considering taking GAMSAT exams for entry into Medicine. I also have three children. I am currently going round in circles considering whether or not going in this direction is doable for someone in my positon. Would love some replies from anyone in a similar situation. TIA
I'd agree with the above.

Obviously the final decision is going to be very personal to you. Factors like how old + independent your children are, what childcare you have for them, your financial position and your partner's views are all highly relevant.

I am a doctor with a child at the moment, and yes its the weekends, evenings and nights that are the main problem. And not just because of how tired they make you! Fortunately my partner has quite regular hours and is able to pick up the slack when I am unavailable - not sure how that is for you. Your worst case scenario would be working an A&E SHO rota for 4 or 6 months - that'd be super super difficult I'd imagine. And then what if you are not competitive enough to get into the deanery you want and have to move region, as pointed out. The NHS early years are very much built for young single people. There's a reason next to no one is married in the Foundation years haha.

But in terms of will they let you in, could you get in etc - yeah you could. GEM is really competitive of course though - don't assume you will get in first time!
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becausethenight
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(Original post by DSKE)
I think this is the thread you’re talking about
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6316066

Unrelated but do you now have powers to move stuff away and towards the medicine forum?
:ta:
Sort of the opposite really - I can only move stuff if it’s already in Medicine!
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KEH09
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(Original post by becausethenight)
:hi:
The thread you posted in was 10 years old so I've made a shiny new one for you where hopefully you'll get some good replies.
ecolier, GANFYD, Democracy and nexttime are all doctors who might be able to help. I know there was a 'medicine at 35+' thread doing the rounds a few months ago which might be helpful but I can't find it, so one of them might be able to link that too.
Ah, thank you very much!
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KEH09
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(Original post by ecolier)
There won't be many people in your circumstances... the problem with doing medicine isn't the course itself, it's being a junior doctor. As said, there are much more applicants in their 30s, maybe even early 40s.

If you think you are OK with doing 13 hour long day / night shifts, potentislly being asked to move to another region for training, and being treated like dirt in your 50s, then why not. But this is something that's relatively easy as a single person in their 20s, much harder for someone later in life with children and connections.
Thank you for replying to my thread so quickly. I'm interested in knowing why you think I would be treated like dirt at work? Is that by more senior members of staff or the patients?!
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ecolier
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(Original post by KEH09)
Thank you for replying to my thread so quickly. I'm interested in knowing why you think I would be treated like dirt at work? Is that by more senior members of staff or the patients?!
Definitely not the patients, they are indeed our ray of sunshine.

It's (usually) not the more senior staff either. They have been through it and know that it's tough.

It's the people who usually don't have a clue, like human resources, payroll, medical staffing, staff at the Deanery etc.
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KEH09
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(Original post by nexttime)
I'd agree with the above.

Obviously the final decision is going to be very personal to you. Factors like how old + independent your children are, what childcare you have for them, your financial position and your partner's views are all highly relevant.

I am a doctor with a child at the moment, and yes its the weekends, evenings and nights that are the main problem. And not just because of how tired they make you! Fortunately my partner has quite regular hours and is able to pick up the slack when I am unavailable - not sure how that is for you. Your worst case scenario would be working an A&E SHO rota for 4 or 6 months - that'd be super super difficult I'd imagine. And then what if you are not competitive enough to get into the deanery you want and have to move region, as pointed out. The NHS early years are very much built for young single people. There's a reason next to no one is married in the Foundation years haha.

But in terms of will they let you in, could you get in etc - yeah you could. GEM is really competitive of course though - don't assume you will get in first time!
Thank you for replying so quickly.

Well...my children are now of an age where by they're more independent, one on the way to Uni, one in High School and one key stage 2. I am well supported as regards to childcare and I have a partner who is behind me if I decide to go ahead with this. Like your partner he is in regular hours.

I have been mulling it over for the last 3 years but didn't go ahead because I felt the children were too young.

If I got in, I would be studying in Rep of Ireland as this is where I am based. With regards to the deanery issue, we have far less options for Medical schools here, so I'm not sure how exactly it would work; it's a much smaller country obviously with a far smaller population.

It's a lot to consider and I am very grateful to have found this forum! Thank you
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KEH09
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(Original post by ecolier)
Definitely not the patients, they are indeed our ray of sunshine.

It's (usually) not the more senior staff either. They have been through it and know that it's tough.

It's the people who usually don't have a clue, like human resources, payroll, medical staffing, staff at the Deanery etc.
I would be studying in the Rep of Ireland, so I'm going to look in to how/if the Deanery system is in place here. Many thanks for your time.
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ecolier
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(Original post by KEH09)
I would be studying in the Rep of Ireland, so I'm going to look in to how/if the Deanery system is in place here. Many thanks for your time.
Ah, it's different working / training there compared to the UK.

I don't know if it's better or worse, but the only thing I know is that you are paid more!
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KEH09
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(Original post by ecolier)
Ah, it's different working / training there compared to the UK.

I don't know if it's better or worse, but the only thing I know is that you are paid more!
Oh, well I didn't know that!! I think also I was looking for info on exactly how challening the Chemistry part of the GAMSAT is, as this is definitely my weaker area
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ecolier
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(Original post by KEH09)
Oh, well I didn't know that!! I think also I was looking for info on exactly how challening the Chemistry part of the GAMSAT is, as this is definitely my weaker area
Best to ask (I think you already did) in the GAMSAT thread.
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KEH09
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(Original post by ecolier)
Best to ask (I think you already did) in the GAMSAT thread.
Many thanks for your help
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dentaldiva
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Considered doing an access course? That’s an option..
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username2825764
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(Original post by ecolier)
There won't be many people in your circumstances... the problem with doing medicine isn't the course itself, it's being a junior doctor. As said, there are much more applicants in their 30s, maybe even early 40s.

If you think you are OK with doing 13 hour long day / night shifts, potentislly being asked to move to another region for training, and being treated like dirt in your 50s, then why not. But this is something that's relatively easy as a single person in their 20s, much harder for someone later in life with children and connections.
Not to hijack the thread, but I'm wondering, when you say 'treated like dirt', do you mean jr doctors get treated like dirt by more senior colleagues or the general public/politicians?
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ecolier
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(Original post by MalcolmX)
Not to hijack the thread, but I'm wondering, when you say 'treated like dirt', do you mean jr doctors get treated like dirt by more senior colleagues or the general public/politicians?
Read post #8 https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...76&postcount=8
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ahorey
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(Original post by KEH09)
I would be studying in the Rep of Ireland, so I'm going to look in to how/if the Deanery system is in place here. Many thanks for your time.
ROI is also around 15k a year for grad entry.
Irish training is 1 year of internship which is basically hell (several friends have been interns) and then you apply to specialities. Hell because of hours, low pay and low staffing levels afaik.
After that if you apply to anything that’s not GP you could be basically anywhere in Ireland. My friend is married to another dr who is also in training - they’ve been married 5 years now and have been able to live together for of those!!
One was Galway for a year and one was dublin. Then limerick and Waterford...

It would be v difficult for someone with a family imo.
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Nadiaziz
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(Original post by KEH09)
Thank you for replying so quickly.

Well...my children are now of an age where by they're more independent, one on the way to Uni, one in High School and one key stage 2. I am well supported as regards to childcare and I have a partner who is behind me if I decide to go ahead with this. Like your partner he is in regular hours.

I have been mulling it over for the last 3 years but didn't go ahead because I felt the children were too young.

If I got in, I would be studying in Rep of Ireland as this is where I am based. With regards to the deanery issue, we have far less options for Medical schools here, so I'm not sure how exactly it would work; it's a much smaller country obviously with a far smaller population.

It's a lot to consider and I am very grateful to have found this forum! Thank you
Hi ,
I’m exactly in the same position as you. My eldest one is in uni, second one in year 10, and the third one in yr 7. To be honest it feels very nice to know that there are people out there who are in the same boat with me. I thought I’m the only one who has got this passion to study medicine at this stage of life.
I have spoken to medconnect Europe. They have advised about the three yrs of pre clinical online through international European university in Ukraine and then transferring to U.K. for clinical rotations. But the only hurdle is that they can’t guarantee if they will be able to set rotations in my city which is my preference.
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ahorey
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(Original post by Nadiaziz)
Hi ,
I’m exactly in the same position as you. My eldest one is in uni, second one in year 10, and the third one in yr 7. To be honest it feels very nice to know that there are people out there who are in the same boat with me. I thought I’m the only one who has got this passion to study medicine at this stage of life.
I have spoken to medconnect Europe. They have advised about the three yrs of pre clinical online through international European university in Ukraine and then transferring to U.K. for clinical rotations. But the only hurdle is that they can’t guarantee if they will be able to set rotations in my city which is my preference.
what are the universities that accept transfers from an online course?
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