jenxjen
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I have 0 idea on how to answer this question for Wuthering Heights, I also have to compare it with 2 other texts from the Romantic anthology. Even if you don't do romantic anthology, are there any points in the plot in which can help me answer this question:

Compare how writers of two of your studied texts present encounters that disappoint.

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Plan and complete a full response to: Compare how writers of two of your studied texts present encounters with Desire

PLS PLS PLS HELP! I need to answer this essay ASAP! Thank you!
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sienna3
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(Original post by jenxjen)
I have 0 idea on how to answer this question for Wuthering Heights, I also have to compare it with 2 other texts from the Romantic anthology. Even if you don't do romantic anthology, are there any points in the plot in which can help me answer this question:

Compare how writers of two of your studied texts present encounters that disappoint.

OR

Plan and complete a full response to: Compare how writers of two of your studied texts present encounters with Desire

PLS PLS PLS HELP! I need to answer this essay ASAP! Thank you!
In response to the second question, found this online:

The theme of desire explored in Wuthering Heights is most evident through the portrayal of love and passion. Arguably the greatest love within the novel is between Catherine and Heathcliff; despite it being all-consuming it is also rather destructive. In contrast to this, the love portrayed between Catherine and Edgar is seemingly more civilised than passionate. Their love shows peace and comfort, and is more socially acceptable, but nonetheless it doesn’t stand in the way of Heathcliff and Catherine’s more profound connection. We are introduced to this dilemma within Chapter 9 (see fig 2, attached). We are shown Catherine’s love for Edgar is rather superficial in that readers are made aware prior to this of her true feelings towards Heathcliff. This chapter strongly questions the idea of marriage, not only the reasoning behind it but also the necessity of it. Catherine marries Edgar although she loves Heathcliff considerably more. Yet, as long as he is still in her life she can exist. It is suggested that Catherine’s love for Edgar is superficial, whereas her passionate love for Heathcliff is so strong that it does not require the bond of marriage to secure it.
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