MeForPm
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I just wanted to know which one is better for postgrad study and prospect wise. I know pharmacology is study of how drugs work in the body. Pharmacology is bit niche i think compared to biochem. ive been told to do biochem at UG and masters in pharmacology if im interested as a masters leaves lots of options. I have the option to transfer in between the courses as well. Would you recommend to choose biochem over pharmacology for UG? why and why not?
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MeForPm
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QuentinM
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(Original post by MeForPm)
Hey
I just wanted to know which one is better for postgrad study and prospect wise. I know pharmacology is study of how drugs work in the body. Pharmacology is bit niche i think compared to biochem. ive been told to do biochem at UG and masters in pharmacology if im interested as a masters leaves lots of options. I have the option to transfer in between the courses as well. Would you recommend to choose biochem over pharmacology for UG? why and why not?
No need to bump as its still quite an early post, although I'm not sure how I missed this as I check this forum far too regularly...

I'd ask do you have any particular idea what you might want to do in the future after your degree (obviously its still early days so you don't have to have any solid ideas yet!)? As someone who works in biological science research, I've worked with people who have done either degree and can say both prepare you for it well.

I wouldn't say either degree is "niche", both are pretty broad even if they focus on different things. As you say pharmacology focuses on how drugs work, to be honest a lot of the modules in early years will be similar (genetics, cell biology etc) to biochemistry. In your final years it goes to a slightly broader focus of whole organ physiology etc but it depends on the university. Biochemistry usually focuses more on molecular level events-protein interactions etc. I'd choose a degree based on which one of those options sounds more appealing-i didn't give a huge amount of detail so feel free to ask more questions as needed.
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MeForPm
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(Original post by QuentinM)
No need to bump as its still quite an early post, although I'm not sure how I missed this as I check this forum far too regularly...

I'd ask do you have any particular idea what you might want to do in the future after your degree (obviously its still early days so you don't have to have any solid ideas yet!)? As someone who works in biological science research, I've worked with people who have done either degree and can say both prepare you for it well.

I wouldn't say either degree is "niche", both are pretty broad even if they focus on different things. As you say pharmacology focuses on how drugs work, to be honest a lot of the modules in early years will be similar (genetics, cell biology etc) to biochemistry. In your final years it goes to a slightly broader focus of whole organ physiology etc but it depends on the university. Biochemistry usually focuses more on molecular level events-protein interactions etc. I'd choose a degree based on which one of those options sounds more appealing-i didn't give a huge amount of detail so feel free to ask more questions as needed.
Personally to me, researching how drugs work and provide reactions in the body is way more interesting than just learning about ribosomes and amino acids tbh. I mean, I wouldn't really mind studying proteins and carbs at molecular level as A-level biology sorts of gives us a foresight on that. And especially after the pandemic, I would say that pharmaceutical industry would be appreciated way more than before.
What my concern was however, was is it true to do your BSc in a broad degree like Biochem and then do Pharmacology at MSc or, starting with Pharmacology at BSc would not be a disadvantage.
End of the day we choose a degree based on our interests as well as the career prospect, so I wanted to reassure myself if Pharmacology is not a bad choice compared to Biochem
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QuentinM
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(Original post by MeForPm)
Personally to me, researching how drugs work and provide reactions in the body is way more interesting than just learning about ribosomes and amino acids tbh. I mean, I wouldn't really mind studying proteins and carbs at molecular level as A-level biology sorts of gives us a foresight on that. And especially after the pandemic, I would say that pharmaceutical industry would be appreciated way more than before.
What my concern was however, was is it true to do your BSc in a broad degree like Biochem and then do Pharmacology at MSc or, starting with Pharmacology at BSc would not be a disadvantage.
End of the day we choose a degree based on our interests as well as the career prospect, so I wanted to reassure myself if Pharmacology is not a bad choice compared to Biochem
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I'm not sure where you heard that, personally I don't agree with it, I wouldn't say a pharmacology degree is a disadvantage at all relative to biochemistry, for many research projects it might be a slight advantage in that it might make it easier to understand a lot of the background stuff a lot quicker.

I wouldn't say the pharmaceutical industry would be appreciated a lot more post-pandemic, given how vaccines were not developed by people studying pharmacology and most of the drugs currently used to treat coronavirus are repurposed (we haven't see any of the actual specially designed drugs just yet).

During and after your degree, if you build the right skills, that's the most important thing for securing a career in research, to be honest.
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MeForPm
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(Original post by QuentinM)
I'm not sure where you heard that, personally I don't agree with it, I wouldn't say a pharmacology degree is a disadvantage at all relative to biochemistry, for many research projects it might be a slight advantage in that it might make it easier to understand a lot of the background stuff a lot quicker.

I wouldn't say the pharmaceutical industry would be appreciated a lot more post-pandemic, given how vaccines were not developed by people studying pharmacology and most of the drugs currently used to treat coronavirus are repurposed (we haven't see any of the actual specially designed drugs just yet).

During and after your degree, if you build the right skills, that's the most important thing for securing a career in research, to be honest.
One of my friend who does a Biochemistry degree says that a Biochem degree is better since the topic they cover are more general and broad, which opens more options for them compared to pharmacology? As pharmacology is mainly on drugs in the body and biochem is more on the study at macromolecular level of the whole of living organisms. And that this gives them more job opportunities compared to someone with a BSc in pharmcol?
Thanks
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