British vs English - What's the difference?

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Anonymous #1
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One of the questions on the new census form.
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New Zealand Bird
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(Original post by Anonymous)
One of the questions on the new census form.
Both the same.
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Justaboutalive
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England exists within Britain.
British is a nationality.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Anonymous)
One of the questions on the new census form.
(Original post by New Zealand Bird)
Both the same.
British. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain

English. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England
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Rufus the red
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Britain is composed of Wales, Scotland, England and Northern Ireland.
(though some of them might not stay part of it for long :lol:)
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Dee-Emma
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Haven't seen the form yet, but is it asking for nationality, identity, birthplace? What other options are there Cornish? Welsh? Etc
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Dee-Emma)
Haven't seen the form yet, but is it asking for nationality, identity, birthplace? What other options are there Cornish? Welsh? Etc
Google it.
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Dee-Emma
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Google it.
I'll see the form when I fill it in. Just that you'd asked a question out of context - you could've just said rather than biting back. Maybe you could've googled for your answer too.
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CroissantBoy
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A full breakdown for anyone interested-
Great Britain (Known as Britain) - The main big island containing Scotland, England and Wales plus all the smaller islands surrounding the mainland, The isle of sky, the isle of man etc.

The United Kingdom - Great Britain/ Britain, plus Northern Ireland, all together thats Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland plus all the smaller islands within those countries

The British Isles - The United Kingdom and Ireland, Ireland is a separate country to Northern Ireland and are not British but share a land mass with Northern Ireland.

*Note if somebody says they’re British they usually aren’t talking about Northern Ireland as that’s a part of the United Kingdom not Britain. That’s why in all events where Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland are competing as a whole the team is called The UK not Britain
Last edited by CroissantBoy; 3 months ago
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Vapordave
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Just put how you would typically identify. I was born and raised in England but I didn't tick it since I don't usually identify as English.
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Dee-Emma
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(Original post by CroissantBoy)
A full breakdown for anyone interested-
Great Britain (Known as Britain) - The main big island containing Scotland, England and Wales plus all the smaller islands surrounding the mainland, The isle of sky, the isle of man etc.

The United Kingdom - Great Britain/ Britain, plus Northern Ireland, all together thats Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland plus all the smaller islands within those countries

The British Isles - The United Kingdom and Ireland, Ireland is a separate country to Northern Ireland and are not British but share a land mass with Northern Ireland.

*Note if somebody says they’re British they usually aren’t talking about Northern Ireland as that’s a part of the United Kingdom not Britain. That’s why in all events where Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland are competing as a whole the team is called The UK not Britain
That's nice and clear in legal / constitutional terms... But where does the original question figure in this? Is it just personal self-identity?
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ANM775
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(Original post by Anonymous)
One of the questions on the new census form.
english you are white and live here, and your parents/grandparents were likely born here

british you are non white and grew up here or have lived here for enough time to feel part of the community.
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UniversalPower
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(Original post by Vapordave)
Just put how you would typically identify. I was born and raised in England but I didn't tick it since I don't usually identify as English.
You're English since you were born in England. But you do not identify as English, so do you identify as British or something else?
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Vapordave
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(Original post by UniversalPower)
You're English since you were born in England. But you do not identify as English, so do you identify as British or something else?
I do identify as English sometimes, but I'm far more comfortable identifying as British.
I am 1/8 white but I am visibly and culturally black.

I'm also a dual national so I identify with the other country but less so than British.
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Interea
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(Original post by CroissantBoy)
A full breakdown for anyone interested-
Great Britain (Known as Britain) - The main big island containing Scotland, England and Wales plus all the smaller islands surrounding the mainland, The isle of sky, the isle of man etc.

The United Kingdom - Great Britain/ Britain, plus Northern Ireland, all together thats Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland plus all the smaller islands within those countries

The British Isles - The United Kingdom and Ireland, Ireland is a separate country to Northern Ireland and are not British but share a land mass with Northern Ireland.

*Note if somebody says they’re British they usually aren’t talking about Northern Ireland as that’s a part of the United Kingdom not Britain. That’s why in all events where Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland are competing as a whole the team is called The UK not Britain
Northern Irish people have British citizenship, so generally British as an identity would include them even though they aren't in Britain (it's always confused me too but I can't really argue with the fact my family have British passports :lol:).
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londonmyst
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(Original post by ANM775)
english you are white and live here, and your parents/grandparents were likely born here

british you are non white and grew up here or have lived here for enough time to feel part of the community.
Are those your personal definitions or something you were taught at school?

Most of my english identifying friends are asian, born in India or Ireland, who received their Conservative Party membership cards years before they applied for British nationality.

The British identifying friends tend to be a mix of: Green Party & lib dem members, northerners who prefer being a manc or scouser to english, religious fundamentalists too fixated on the UJ and dual nationals with 3+ passports (that opt to mostly live in Britain for economic reasons/access to free healthcare for chronic health problems).
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londonmyst
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Just choose whichever option of the two you identify with or prefer to be identified as.
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ANM775
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Are those your personal definitions or something you were taught at school?

Most of my english identifying friends are asian, born in India or Ireland, who received their Conservative Party membership cards years before they applied for British nationality.

The British identifying friends tend to be a mix of: Green Party & lib dem members, northerners who prefer being a manc or scouser to english, religious fundamentalists too fixated on the UJ and dual nationals with 3+ passports (that opt to mostly live in Britain for economic reasons/access to free healthcare for chronic health problems).
no one really classes a non white person as "english" and to be honest i've never seen a non white person identify as english either.
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MoreCryoraptor
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English means you come from the country of England. British means you come from somewhere in the United Kingdom. If you are English, you are British, but if you are British you are not necessarily English. For example I consider myself to be broadly British, but only around 50% English as I also have large contributions from Wales and Ireland, and smaller ones from Scotland.

If you go back far enough in time, English and British were mutually exclusive as being English tended to mean you were of Anglo-Saxon origin, while being British meant you were of Brythonic Celtic origin, i.e. Cornish, Cumbrian, Welsh, what is now Western English or to some degree Scottish during the Anglo-Saxon period. However over time the definition changed and now British means anywhere within the United Kingdom including England, even though many living in Southern and Eastern England would not have traditionally (over 500 years ago) been considered British and would instead be considered of Anglo-Saxon/Germanic origin, and some in east Lincolnshire and Yorkshire of Norse origin.
Last edited by MoreCryoraptor; 3 months ago
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londonmyst
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(Original post by ANM775)
no one really classes a non white person as "english" and to be honest i've never seen a non white person identify as english either.
Union Jack Wearing Bulldog does. :yep:
You need to meet some of the St George's Day asian party crowd, their english nationalism would have you singing just as enthusiastically from the same hymn book or accused of treason against dear old england.

My best friend is asian, was born in India and applied for nationality in her late teens.
She's as english as I am.
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