Rainbowpink1999x
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Report Thread starter 6 months ago
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Can someone please help me with the following questions? it is identify the acids and bases in the following reactions
1. HCl(aq) + NaOH(aq) --> NaCl(aq) + H2O(l)
and 2. NH3(aq) + H2O(l) --> NH4+(aq) + OH-(aq)
My answers atm are HCl = acid 1, NaOH= base 2, NaCl= acid 2 and H2O= base 1
and NH3 = Acid 1, H2O = Base 2, NH4+ = Base 1 and OH- = Acid 2
however i think this is wrong and im very confused atm
Last edited by Rainbowpink1999x; 6 months ago
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Igniform
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Report 6 months ago
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(Original post by Rainbowpink1999x)
Can someone please help me with the following questions? it is identify the acids and bases in the following reactions
1. HCl(aq) + NaOH(aq) --> NaCl(aq) + H2O(l)
and 2. NH3(aq) + H2O(l) --> NH4+(aq) + OH-(aq)
My answers atm are HCl = acid 1, NaOH= base 2, NaCl= acid 2 and H2O= base 1
and NH3 = Acid 1, H2O = Base 2, NH4+ = Base 1 and OH- = Acid 2
however i think this is wrong and im very confused atm
For 1. you got the first part right, HCl is the acid and NaOH is the base. However, NaCl can't be an acid because it has no H+, it is not a base either - it's a neutral salt. You can't assign acid or base to the right hand side of this reaction because a reaction between a strong acid + strong base means it's a neutralisation reaction.


For 2. you've got it the wrong way round - NH3 is always a strong base, so H2O must be the acid (because H2O can be either a base or an acid depending on the situation). NH4+ is an acid and OH- is a base.
This is a reaction between a strong base (NH3) and a weak acid (H2O) so it forms a weak acid (NH4+) and a strong base (OH-). In this case, you have acids/bases on both sides of the reaction.
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Rainbowpink1999x
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Report Thread starter 6 months ago
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(Original post by Igniform)
For 1. you got the first part right, HCl is the acid and NaOH is the base. However, NaCl can't be an acid because it has no H+, it is not a base either - it's a neutral salt. You can't assign acid or base to the right hand side of this reaction because a reaction between a strong acid + strong base means it's a neutralisation reaction.


For 2. you've got it the wrong way round - NH3 is always a strong base, so H2O must be the acid (because H2O can be either a base or an acid depending on the situation). NH4+ is an acid and OH- is a base.
This is a reaction between a strong base (NH3) and a weak acid (H2O) so it forms a weak acid (NH4+) and a strong base (OH-). In this case, you have acids/bases on both sides of the reaction.
Perfect! Thanks for the explanation that’s helped a lot
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