Mrssomers
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#1
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#1
I’ve just received and accepted an unconditional offer for Psychology with Counselling undergraduate degree - 17 years after leaving school. I’m absolutely bricking it.
Can anyone recommend some good books for me to get stuck into over the summer to make me feel a little more like I’m not going to completely embarrass myself?
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greg tony
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(Original post by Mrssomers)
I’ve just received and accepted an unconditional offer for Psychology with Counselling undergraduate degree - 17 years after leaving school. I’m absolutely bricking it.
Can anyone recommend some good books for me to get stuck into over the summer to make me feel a little more like I’m not going to completely embarrass myself?
Firstly, you wont embarrass yourself. The whole point of learning is that you don't know what they will teach you, so give yourself a break. I work in the field of psychology at present, and did my undergrad 4 years ago. If I had any advice, I would say don't read anything. This is for 2 reasons, firstly why waste time and brain space on concepts and ideas that you may never use in your degree. (psychology is generally very easy to learn, and most concepts are easy to understand quite quickly- not saying it is easy degree though, as assignments can be tricky). The 2nd reason is that if you are anything like me, you will wish you made as much as you could from your free time before and during the summer breaks of the course, this is the key resource you will regret not using.

If you still really wanted to read a book, I would go for general academic, i.e. more focused on writing skills than psychology (Steven Pinker- sense of style was something I found useful). This way you get core skills in writing that you can use in any assignment, thus no wasted effort.

Good luck on your course, you will smash it (also everyone is nervous, and if i was a younger student i might be intimidated by an older learner, so remember it works both ways)

Greg
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Mrssomers
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(Original post by greg tony)
Firstly, you wont embarrass yourself. The whole point of learning is that you don't know what they will teach you, so give yourself a break. I work in the field of psychology at present, and did my undergrad 4 years ago. If I had any advice, I would say don't read anything. This is for 2 reasons, firstly why waste time and brain space on concepts and ideas that you may never use in your degree. (psychology is generally very easy to learn, and most concepts are easy to understand quite quickly- not saying it is easy degree though, as assignments can be tricky). The 2nd reason is that if you are anything like me, you will wish you made as much as you could from your free time before and during the summer breaks of the course, this is the key resource you will regret not using.

If you still really wanted to read a book, I would go for general academic, i.e. more focused on writing skills than psychology (Steven Pinker- sense of style was something I found useful). This way you get core skills in writing that you can use in any assignment, thus no wasted effort.

Good luck on your course, you will smash it (also everyone is nervous, and if i was a younger student i might be intimidated by an older learner, so remember it works both ways)

Greg
Thanks Greg,

Solid advice! I will enjoy the summer with my kids then before I’m too stressed to speak to them!
Definitely like the idea of getting prepared academically though, the statistics and data element is not my strong suit. Do you think there is a way to prepare for that?
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greg tony
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(Original post by Mrssomers)
Thanks Greg,

Solid advice! I will enjoy the summer with my kids then before I’m too stressed to speak to them!
Definitely like the idea of getting prepared academically though, the statistics and data element is not my strong suit. Do you think there is a way to prepare for that?
Love stats (joking), you won't be alone there in! Look at it this way, I'm doing the doctorate in Clinical Psychology as we speak and the majority of us still don't like them.

The Andy field stats books are often seen as the best, and most of us still use it, so that's worth a shout. Also, remember while stats plays a role, qualitative research is also very useful (no stats), so research can be fun depending on your strengths.

Hope you enjoy your summer with your kids, and please don't hesitate to message me if you need any advice. The little I know is yours!

Greg
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Mrssomers
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(Original post by greg tony)
Love stats (joking), you won't be alone there in! Look at it this way, I'm doing the doctorate in Clinical Psychology as we speak and the majority of us still don't like them.

The Andy field stats books are often seen as the best, and most of us still use it, so that's worth a shout. Also, remember while stats plays a role, qualitative research is also very useful (no stats), so research can be fun depending on your strengths.

Hope you enjoy your summer with your kids, and please don't hesitate to message me if you need any advice. The little I know is yours!

Greg
Thank you, I really appreciate it. And also boosted my morale because I’d love to get to clinical level but fear it might be beyond me. However if most still don’t like stats then at least that doesn’t have to be a fear!

Thanks for your help again, and best of luck in your doctorate.

Siobhan
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Mrssomers)
Thanks Greg,

Solid advice! I will enjoy the summer with my kids then before I’m too stressed to speak to them!
Definitely like the idea of getting prepared academically though, the statistics and data element is not my strong suit. Do you think there is a way to prepare for that?
It will depend on the degree course you're doing. Usually the stats required in psychology degrees isn't all that taxing.
Using the following degree as an example: https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...ourse-details/
Manchester's stats modules are the following:
https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...e-unit-details
https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...e-unit-details

You can either look at the mandatory texts and read the sections based on the topics mentioned in the outline. Having said that, the complexity of the stats techniques don't really stretch beyond hypothesis testing all that much. I would recommend either googling the topics (I wouldn't recommend dwelling too much on what it says in Wikipedia articles, since they can be really technical even for academics) or read up what is available in the stats section of A Level maths textbooks.
Some of the material e.g. ANOVA and multiple regressions are difficult to delve into unless you have software available (SPSS being the preferred software to use, but this will also depend on the university). A cheap alternative is to install an add-on in Excel called Analysis. It's not close to the flexibility or versatility of professional and dedicated software packages, but it's a good alternative to use to play around with.
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Mrssomers
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
It will depend on the degree course you're doing. Usually the stats required in psychology degrees isn't all that taxing.
Using the following degree as an example: https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...ourse-details/
Manchester's stats modules are the following:
https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...e-unit-details
https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...e-unit-details

You can either look at the mandatory texts and read the sections based on the topics mentioned in the outline. Having said that, the complexity of the stats techniques don't really stretch beyond hypothesis testing all that much. I would recommend either googling the topics (I wouldn't recommend dwelling too much on what it says in Wikipedia articles, since they can be really technical even for academics) or read up what is available in the stats section of A Level maths textbooks.
Some of the material e.g. ANOVA and multiple regressions are difficult to delve into unless you have software available (SPSS being the preferred software to use, but this will also depend on the university). A cheap alternative is to install an add-on in Excel called Analysis. It's not close to the flexibility or versatility of professional and dedicated software packages, but it's a good alternative to use to play around with.
A previous student has told me that Trent use SPSS and someone else mentioned R Studio? My genuine concern is I’m a pen and paper kinda person. My husband is a data analyst so I’m sure he can help me but I’d prefer not to rely on him because when I get stressed and he’s schooling me it will end in divorce!
I’m going to look at analysis and the A level stats stuff and maybe I will feel a bit less worried.
Thank you
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iammichealjackson
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#8
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(Original post by Mrssomers)
A previous student has told me that Trent use SPSS and someone else mentioned R Studio? My genuine concern is I’m a pen and paper kinda person. My husband is a data analyst so I’m sure he can help me but I’d prefer not to rely on him because when I get stressed and he’s schooling me it will end in divorce!
I’m going to look at analysis and the A level stats stuff and maybe I will feel a bit less worried.
Thank you
For stat's i'd highly recommend this book:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Statistics-...6928219&sr=8-5

Andy Field's books are a bit naff as a introduction to statistics, but they're great for learning SPSS (if your course requires it), or if you need to pick up stats really quickly and want to skimp on the details. If you have time, a book like above really covers the fundamentals quite slowly and you'll honestly breeze through stats compared to others.
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